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0.4%
11th-hour appeal targets ranked voting referendum in Maine
msn.com
Article
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MSN
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A state judge's ruling allowing a referendum the use of ranked choice voting in presidential elections in Maine isn't going without a challenge. The secretary of state's office and intervening parties have filed separate appeals of the judge's decision that prevents the voting system from being used in the November presidential election in Maine. Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap said his appeal focuses on whether people... MORE→
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A state judge's ruling allowing a referendum the use of ranked choice voting in presidential elections in Maine isn't going without a challenge. The secretary of state's office and intervening parties have filed separate appeals of the judge's decision that prevents the voting system from being used in the November presidential election in Maine. Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap said his appeal focuses on whether people circulating petitions must be registered voters at the same time they're collecting signatures. The Maine Republican Party, which pressed for the referendum, exceeded the threshold of 63,068 by just 22 signatures thanks to the judge's ruling on Monday. The timing of the judge's decision left little opportunity for further appeal. The deadline for collecting materials needed to print ballots was supposed to be Friday, but Dunlap's spokesperson suggested there's wiggle room. She could not provide an absolute deadline for printing ballots. Maine is the first state in the nation to adopt the voting system that lets voters rank candidates from first to last on their ballot. A candidate who reaches 50% or more in the first round of voting is declared the winner. If there’s no majority, then there are additional tabulations, aided by computers, in which last-place finishers are eliminated and those voters’ second choices are reallocated to the remaining field. The voting system was first used in congressional races for the first time in 2018. Because the voting system runs afoul of the Maine Constitution, it is not used in the governor’s race or legislative contests. MORE→
> 1 year
Aug 28, 2020

 
 
 
0.4%

480x360
164 | Andrew Yang: The Case for a New Party, Open Primaries, and Ranked Choice Voting
youtube.com
Video
0:58:25
YouTube
The Realignment
BingVideo
Andrew Yang, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and author of Forward: Notes on the Future of Our Democracy, joins The Realignment to discuss the Forward Party and why he thinks open party primaries and ranked choice voting are the keys to ending political gridlock in Washington. Subscribe to our Substack: https://therealignment.substack ... MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
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18 NYC Council candidates to inform NYers on ranked-choice voting
msn.com
Article
3930 chars
MSN
Eighteen City Council candidates were set to launch a campaign Monday informing New Yorkers of ranked-choice voting, the process in which voters list candidates for office in order of preference instead of picking just one. MORE→
They’re revved up for rank-choice voting.© Barry Williams In contrast to early voting the lines are non existent at Madison Square Garden during the voting Tuesday, Nov. 3 2020 in New York. (Barry Williams) Eighteen City Council candidates were set to launch a campaign Monday informing New Yorkers of ranked-choice voting, the process in which voters list candidates for office in order of preference instead of picking just one.The method was getting its first New York City trial as of this past weekend, when early voting began for a special City Council election in central Queens.On Thursday, Tiffany Cabán will hold an event to educate voters at a table set up at the Ditmars Blvd. subway station. Cabán, a reformist who made waves by nearly winning the 2019 Democratic primary for Queens district attorney, is running for Council in Astoria this year.Video: Lieu: Trump incited insurrection, support declined (Associated Press)“The traditional system of politics is designed to keep out working-class and first-time candidates — especially people of color and queer folks,” she said in a statement. “Ranked-choice voting gives candidates with both bold ideas and the shared lived experiences of marginalized communities the space to run.”© Provided by New York Daily News On Thursday, Tiffany Cabán will hold an event to educate voters at a table set up at the Ditmars Blvd. subway station. On Thursday, Tiffany Cabán will hold an event to educate voters at a table set up at the Ditmars Blvd. subway station. (Danielle Hyams/) Other candidates including Pierina Sanchez of the Bronx and Sandy Nurse of Brooklyn are doing similar events. Most of them are seeking office for the first time.“Far too often, women of color are told we need to ‘wait our turn’ to run for office, and reforms like ranked-choice voting help push back on that narrative and open opportunities for us to run,” Sanchez stated.The effort comes amid a legal effort by members of the Council’s Black, Latino and Asian Caucus to delay ranked-choice voting until sometime after the June mayoral primaries. They say the city doesn’t have enough time or resources to inform voters of the process, though a judge rejected their request for a temporary restraining order last month.Under ranked-choice voting, if no candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, a process of elimination ensues. The candidate with the fewest first-choice votes is discarded, and people who voted for him or her get their second choices counted instead. The process continues until someone gets more than 50% of the ballot. MORE→
> 37 weeks
Jan 25, 2021

 
 
 
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192: Bringing More Voices to the Table: Ranked Choice Voting vs. Approval Voting
youtube.com
Video
0:39:51
We Are Libertarians
Listen to the full episode here: https://briannichols.fireside.fm/ranked-choice-voting-vs-approval-voting How to we fix our broken electoral system? Our "pick one" system is clearly broken, especially when considering that we only have two viable choices (and what exciting choices they are, eh?). So, how can we fix our broken voting system and ... MORE→
> 36 weeks
Feb 6, 2021

 
 
 
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1. agreed, dianne is the most progressive (cool)2. rank choice voting 3. yang is more palatable to moderates and conservatives than progressives4. most elected corporate dems are moderates but the voters are not.5. policies over people. dianne is the most progressive https://t.co/vRP5Kx8Bsd
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unapologetic progressive
“@padabota @rontkim @JooHyun_Kang @AndrewYang 1. agreed, dianne is the most progressive (cool)2. rank choice voting 3. yang is more palatable to moderates and conservatives than progressives4. most elected corporate dems are moderates but the voters are not.5. policies over people. dianne is the most progressive” MORE→
> 21 weeks
May 17, 2021

 
 
 
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1st ranked choice voting primary results expected but absentee ballots still being counted
youtube.com
Video
0:01:44
PIX11 News
The first round of ranked choice voting results in the Democratic primary for New York City mayor were expected to be released Tuesday, however, absentee ballots are still being counted and a winner likely won’t be known for at least another week. MORE→
> 15 weeks
Jun 29, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
2016 with ranked choice voting
youtube.com
Video
0:00:26
Lefty Guitarist
Bernie wins
> 1 year
Oct 6, 2020

 
 
 
0.4%
2020 Alaska Ballot Measure 2 - Open Primary Elections, Ranked Choice Voting, Campaign Finance Disclosure
indystar.com
Article
450 chars
indystar.com
The Indianapolis Star Staff
See election results, a county-by-county map and more for the Alaska Ballot Measure 2-Open Pri Ranked Voting GE election on Nov. 3, 2020.
2020 Alaska Ballot Measure 2 - Open Primary Elections, Ranked Choice Voting, Campaign Finance Disclosure Election Date: Nov. 3, 2020 | Updated 12:03 AM EST Nov. 3, 2020
> 49 weeks
Nov 2, 2020

 
 
 
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2020 Ballot Measure 2: A Debate on Proposed Changes to Alaska's Election System
youtube.com
Video
1:23:07
In the November 2020 general election, Alaskans will vote on Ballot Measure 2, which would change Alaska’s election laws to end partisan primaries, introduce ranked-choice voting and expand disclosure requirements for campaign contributions. In this debate hosted by the University of Alaska Anchorage's Seawolf Debate Team, the UAA Votes ... MORE→
> 51 weeks
Oct 22, 2020

 
 
 
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2020 Massachusetts Question 2 - Create Ranked-Choice Voting Election Results
indystar.com
Article
398 chars
indystar.com
The Indianapolis Star Staff
See election results, a county-by-county map and more for the Massachusetts Question 2 - Create Ranked-Choice Voting election on Nov. 3, 2020.
2020 Massachusetts Question 2 - Create Ranked-Choice Voting Election Results Election Date: Nov. 3, 2020 | Updated 6:02 AM EST Nov. 2, 2020
> 49 weeks
Nov 2, 2020

 
 
 
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2020 Victories: Ranked Choice Voting, Anti-gerrymandering, and Campaign Finance Reform
reddit.com
Video
0 votes and 1 comment so far on Reddit
> 46 weeks
Nov 25, 2020

 
 
 
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2020 Voting Options & Ranked Choice Voting Explained: 10/9/20
youtube.com
Video
0:20:20
PACTV Video Share
State Rep. Kathy LaNatra hosts an informational forum on Ranked Choice Voting, which is the subject of question 2 on the upcoming November 3, 2020 ballot. Coverage provided by PACTV.
> 1 year
Oct 9, 2020

 
 
 
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2021 NYC primary: What is ranked-choice voting
silive.com
Article
7016 chars
silive
Paul Liotta | Pliotta@Siadvance.Com
It will be the first citywide test of the new system, but it has been used in special elections earlier this year.
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Many voters citywide will have their first experience with the new ranked-choice voting system in the primary elections set to start Saturday. Instead of choosing one candidate, voters will have the opportunity to rank up to five candidates in their order of preference. Proponents say the system helps ensure winning candidates have more widespread support. The system, which passed as a ballot measure in 2019, has been used in special elections earlier this year, and the city, the New York City Board of Elections, and the New York City Campaign Finance Board have engaged in education campaigns, including frequent television and online ads. Here’s a look at what New Yorkers should know about the new system. HOW SHOULD MY BALLOT LOOK? Much of the new voting system is in its name. Voters will be asked to simply rank their top five choices for elected positions around the city like mayor, comptroller, borough president, and City Council. The new system will not yet be used for state or federal elections. Given the crowded fields in some of this year’s primaries and the limit to five choices, voters will not be able to rank all the candidates in some of the races, such as the Democratic primary for mayor. That is fine. Voters do not need to rank all the candidates. In fact, if a voter only wants to make one selection, that’s fine too. As always, fill in the bubble completely. Below are two illustrations showing acceptable examples of the ballot. One shows five candidates ranked one through five, and the other shows a voter who only wanted to rank three candidates. What voters cannot do is assign multiple rankings to the same candidate, or multiple candidates to the same ranking. For example, voters cannot assign both first and second choice rankings in the Democratic mayoral primary to Andrew Yang, nor can they select both Eric Adams and Kathryn Garcia as their first choice. If you do give the same candidate multiple rankings, the later rankings will simply not be counted. If you give multiple candidates the same ranking, it is considered an “over vote,” and your vote in that rank and later ranks cannot be counted. Here are two examples of unacceptable ballots. The first shows multiple candidates with the same ranking, and the second shows one candidate with multiple rankings. HOW WILL VOTES BE TALLIED? Again, much of how votes will be tallied is in the “ranked-choice” system’s name, and those elections already conducted around the city offer easy-to-understand illustrations of the count. There have been more than five candidates in three of the elections already conducted using the system. The shortest tally came in the March 23 race for the 11th City Council district, which covers the most northern part of the Bronx. In that race, there were six official participants on the ballot. Like the other ranked-choice races, write-in first choice ballots were the first to be eliminated. From there, voter’s second choices were added to the total number of ballots for each candidate. That process repeats itself until one of the candidates has more than 50% of the total ballots, and is declared the winner. WHAT ABOUT DISABLED VOTERS? Voters who need to use AutoMark Ballot Marking devices will also be able to participate in the ranked-choice voting system. Each choice will be represented on a different screen on which one candidate will be chosen, according to the BOE. WHY RANKED-CHOICE VOTING? Simply put, ranked-choice voting is now the system for local elections, because the city voted for it. In 2019, New Yorkers were faced with five ballot questions — the first of which concerned changes to the city’s electoral system. The shift to ranked-choice represented the most significant change. The proposals are a result of the state-authorized 2019 Charter Revision Commission that proposed the charter revisions. About 74% of voters said they were in favor of the changes on the ballot question. Staten Island was the only borough to vote against the change with about 54% against the changes. In addition to changes in the voting system, there have also been changes to the campaign process. Some organizations and elected officials around the city have made ranked-choice endorsements of the various candidates in this year’s mayoral race. State Sen. Diane Savino gave her second-choice mayoral endorsement to former Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia earlier this month after having already made her first-choice endorsement for Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Proponents of the system, like the organization FairVote , have argued that it promotes majority support, discourages negative campaigning, and provides voters with more choices. Six members of the City Council’s Black, Latino, and Asian Caucus filed a lawsuit in December alleging the city’s Board of Elections (BOE) and Campaign Finance Board (CFB) hadn’t done enough to educate the public about the new system. The courts ultimately dismissed that suit, but a PIX 11, NewsNation and Emerson College poll in March found significant portions of New Yorkers hadn’t even heard about the new system, particularly among Black and Latino New Yorkers. One of the council members on that lawsuit, Alicka Ampry-Samuel (D-Brooklyn), appeared during a mayoral press briefing in April announcing an expanded education effort on the program, and applauded the $15 million investment in ranked-choice voting education. She served as the primary sponsor for a city law first introduced last year that required an education campaign on the voting system “When voters went to the polls in 2019, they could not have predicted that a global pandemic would shift reality,” she said. “The pandemic highlighted a lot of insecurities mainly related to how information flows down to certain communities, especially in hardest hit areas...communities of mostly people of color. We already have a long, torrid history of disenfranchisement, so to circumvent that, this level of funding and this engagement is needed.” Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission. MORE→
> 18 weeks
Jun 12, 2021

 
 
 
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21 to Watch in '21: Voting rights expert Betsy Sweet on what motivates her
youtube.com
Video
0:00:43
YouTube
Democracy For America
BingVideo
Betsy is one of the nation's foremost experts on voting rights expansion and structural democracy reform, best known for her leadership role in securing ranked-choice voting in Maine. With a national reputation as a formidable behind-the-scenes political movement architect, she has more than three decades of experience in electoral politics. MORE→
> 8 weeks
Aug 18, 2021

 
 
 
0.9%
2 Candidates Partner In Ranked-Choice Voting For UWS Council Race
msn.com
Article
4864 chars
MSN
Candidates Sarah Lind and Jeffrey Omura announced a partnership Monday that will look to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage.
UPPER WEST SIDE, NY — Two candidates for the Upper West Side's City Council District 6 race announced a partnership on Monday that looks to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage.Sarah Lind and Jeffrey Omura are both running as Democrats for the open seat vacated by the term-limited Council Member Helen Rosenthal.The two candidates are holding an event on Friday to discuss their "Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) partnership as part of their commitment to Common Cause to educate voters," according to a news release.Common Cause is a democratic organization that describes itself as "leaders in the movement for election administration reform, campaign finance reform and upholding ethics laws to impact systems that undermine people’s faith in democracy."For the first time in 2021, City Council races will deploy the recently passed ranking choice voting method.The method of voting first used in New York City in 2020 is still not always the easiest to understand.Here's how City & State explains it:"Ranked-choice, or instant-runoff voting, allows voters to choose multiple candidates and rank them by order of preference. In New York City, primary and special-election voters will have the choice to rank up to five. So let’s say you like Candidate C the best, but you also like Candidate A and to a lesser extent Candidate B. You can rank Candidate C as your first choice, Candidate A as your second and Candidate B as your third. You don’t have to rank all five – in fact, you can just choose one candidate. But the option is there for you to voice your support for multiple candidates.Once the polls close, if a candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, that person wins outright. If no one has a majority of first-choice votes, after the first round, the person with the lowest number of first-choice votes is eliminated. That candidate’s votes are redistributed to the second-choice candidate on the ballots. The process is repeated for each round – the person with the lowest number of votes gets eliminated and their votes get redistributed to other candidates that have been ranked on the ballot – until only two candidates are left. The person with the most votes then is the winner."A majority, in this case, is over 50 percent.So why partner with another candidate?By creating a partnership, Lind and Omura are telling their voters to rank them as either No. 1 or No.2 on the ballot. This way, if one of them gets eliminated, all of the eliminated candidate's votes would then go to the candidate remaining between the two."I worked with Common Cause to help pass RCV because we are a majority democracy. New Yorkers deserve elected officials who earn over 50% of the vote," Lind said in a news release. "It's also proven that Ranked Choice Voting opens opportunities to a more diverse field of candidates to compete against longtime incumbents. Jeffrey and I hold similar values, and I'm glad to have the opportunity to work together to push a progressive agenda on the Upper West Side."Lind, an attorney and member of the Upper West Side Community Board 7, references "longtime incumbents" in her statement. While there isn't precisely that in the UWS City Council race — there is Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer.Brewer is considered the favorite in the race after serving eight years as the Manhattan Borough President and 12 years in the exact same City Council seat she is running for again in 2021.Zach Weiner, an actor and film producer, and David Gold, the executive director of a non-profit, are also candidates in the race.“Ranked Choice Voting gives the residents of District 6 more options, more power, and more choice,” said Omura in a news release, who was recently elected to his second term as an Office of Actors' Equity Association. “Sara and I agree it’s time for a fresh start for our neighborhood, and I look forward to teaming up with her to ensure we usher in a renaissance for all.”EventLind and Omura will discuss the partnership in an event on Friday at 6:30 p.m. over Zoom. It will be hosted by drag comedian and live vocalist Gina Tonic.Attendees will learn about ranked-choice voting by ranking favorite restaurants, bars, and parks on the Upper West Side.You can sign up for the Zoom here. MORE→
> 37 weeks
Jan 25, 2021

 
 
 
0.9%
2 Candidates Partner In Ranked-Choice Voting For UWS Council Race - Patch.com
patch.com
Article
5661 chars
Upper West Side, NY Patch
Gus Saltonstall
2 Candidates Partner In Ranked-Choice Voting For UWS Council Race - Upper West Side, NY - Candidates Sara Lind and Jeffrey Omura announced a partnership Monday that will look to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage. MORE→
2 Candidates Partner In Ranked-Choice Voting For UWS Council Race Candidates Sara Lind and Jeffrey Omura announced a partnership Monday that will look to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage. Posted Mon, Jan 25, 2021 at 12:56 pm ET | Updated Mon, Jan 25, 2021 at 3:06 pm ET Two candidates for the Upper West Side's City Council District 6 race announced a partnership on Monday that looks to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage. (Photo Credit for Sara Lind picture: Kristen Blush. Photo Credit for Jeffrey Omura: Michael Levy ) UPPER WEST SIDE, NY — Two candidates for the Upper West Side's City Council District 6 race announced a partnership on Monday that looks to use ranked-choice voting to their advantage. Sara Lind and Jeffrey Omura are both running as Democrats for the open seat vacated by the term-limited Council Member Helen Rosenthal. The two candidates are holding an event on Friday to discuss their "Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) partnership as part of their commitment to Common Cause to educate voters," according to a news release. Common Cause is a democratic organization that describes itself as "leaders in the movement for election administration reform, campaign finance reform and upholding ethics laws to impact systems that undermine people's faith in democracy." For the first time in 2021, City Council races will deploy the recently passed ranking choice voting method. The method of voting first used in New York City in 2020 is still not always the easiest to understand. Here's how City & State explains it: "Ranked-choice, or instant-runoff voting, allows voters to choose multiple candidates and rank them by order of preference. In New York City, primary and special-election voters will have the choice to rank up to five. So let's say you like Candidate C the best, but you also like Candidate A and to a lesser extent Candidate B. You can rank Candidate C as your first choice, Candidate A as your second and Candidate B as your third. You don't have to rank all five – in fact, you can just choose one candidate. But the option is there for you to voice your support for multiple candidates. Once the polls close, if a candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, that person wins outright. If no one has a majority of first-choice votes, after the first round, the person with the lowest number of first-choice votes is eliminated. That candidate's votes are redistributed to the second-choice candidate on the ballots. The process is repeated for each round – the person with the lowest number of votes gets eliminated and their votes get redistributed to other candidates that have been ranked on the ballot – until only two candidates are left. The person with the most votes then is the winner." A majority, in this case, is over 50 percent. So why partner with another candidate? By creating a partnership, Lind and Omura are telling their voters to rank them as either No. 1 or No.2 on the ballot. This way, if one of them gets eliminated, all of the eliminated candidate's votes would then go to the candidate remaining between the two. "I worked with Common Cause to help pass RCV because we are a majority democracy. New Yorkers deserve elected officials who earn over 50% of the vote," Lind said in a news release. "It's also proven that Ranked Choice Voting opens opportunities to a more diverse field of candidates to compete against longtime incumbents. Jeffrey and I hold similar values, and I'm glad to have the opportunity to work together to push a progressive agenda on the Upper West Side." Lind, an attorney and member of the Upper West Side Community Board 7, references "longtime incumbents" in her statement. While there isn't precisely that in the UWS City Council race — there is Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Brewer is considered the favorite in the race after serving eight years as the Manhattan Borough President and 12 years in the exact same City Council seat she is running for again in 2021. Zach Weiner, an actor and film producer, and David Gold, the executive director of a non-profit, are also candidates in the race. "Ranked Choice Voting gives the residents of District 6 more options, more power, and more choice," said Omura in a news release, who was recently elected to his second term as an Office of Actors' Equity Association. "Sara and I agree it's time for a fresh start for our neighborhood, and I look forward to teaming up with her to ensure we usher in a renaissance for all." Event Lind and Omura will discuss the partnership in an event on Friday at 6:30 p.m. over Zoom. It will be hosted by drag comedian and live vocalist Gina Tonic. Attendees will learn about ranked-choice voting by ranking favorite restaurants, bars, and parks on the Upper West Side. MORE→
> 37 weeks
Jan 25, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
32,000 cast ballots so far in NYC early primary voting
abc7ny.com
Article
2728 chars
ABC7 New York
Candace Mccowan
In New York City, the voting has already been underway for a couple of days now in the city's mayoral race.
NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- Primary Day in New York is just over a week away. In New York City, the voting has already been underway for a couple of days now in the city's mayoral race. So far, some 32,000 New Yorkers have headed into the polls to take part in early voting. Monday, Maya Wiley will cast her vote at a high school in Flatbush. Eyewitness News saw candidates out over the weekend getting a jumpstart on early voting, with Shaun Donovan and Kathryn Garcia casting their vote early. Andrew Yang was at a polling site on the Upper West Side as his wife voted early. And, Eric Adams and Scott Stringer worked to encourage their supporters to get to the polls, as they each hoped they would be the one to come out on top during ranked choice voting. "The city can't be about luck, it has to be about opportunity," Adams said. "Early voting has started, the energy is high, people are making their voices heard. We know we need change in the city, we need to turn the page," Yang said. Early Voting ends this Sunday and Primary Day is next Tuesday. ALSO READ | NYC elections: What is ranked-choice voting? Voters will want to check ahead at their local polling place because the hours vary, but New Yorkers might want the extra time to think about their vote this year. The City's Board Of Elections website now has a wait time map for early voting locations. Find one by typing in your address. Find your local polling place Polls will be open at various times through next weekend: Monday, June 14, 2021 from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM Tuesday, June 15, 2021 from 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM Wednesday, June 16, 2021 from 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM Thursday, June 17, 2021 from 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM Friday, June 18, 2021 from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM Saturday, June 19, 2021 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Sunday, June 20, 2021 from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM WATCH | Ranked Choice Voting Webchat ---------- * More New York City news * Send us a news tip * Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on YouTube MORE→
> 17 weeks
Jun 14, 2021

 
 
 
0.9%
4 takeaways from New York City's attempt to use ranked-choice voting to pick its next crop of politicians
msn.com
Article
8608 chars
MSN
Insider@Insider.Com (Jake
The Board of Elections screwed up and the candidates didn't play the system to their advantage until the end. But up and down the ballot, it worked.
© TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images New York City Democratic Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images Ranked-choice voting worked as intended, but its New York City debut didn't go off without a few hitches. Ranked-choice voting is a type of ballot that asks voters to list their choices - In New York's case, five - in their order of preference. When the votes are in, the lowest-ranked candidate has their ballots reallocated to their voters' second choices, and then so on and so forth until someone breaks 50%. This means a second runoff election is unnecessary - the runoff is done instantly - and that the winner with the broadest support eventually wins.For the 2021 mayor race, Democrats had a long list of options, but the most popular candidates were Eric Adams, Maya Wiley, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Scott Stringer, Ray McGuire, Dianne Morales, and Shaun Donovan.Some voters may have found themselves doing more homework than they anticipated ahead of filling out their five choices for mayor in the Democratic primary. Still, the elimination system worked exactly as it was supposed to once it became clear no one would finish the first round as an outright winner with at least 50% of the vote.The real drama and chaos that came with counting the votes was solely the result of an underprepared City Board of Elections, not an inherent feature of the ranked-choice systemGotham voters approved in 2019.1. Ranked-choice worked, but in the process illustrated how divided New York City's Democratic voters areAt a rather unprecedented scale in American politics, ranked-choice voting showed how a divided party could choose a candidate if enough voters indicated they could at least live with their second, third, fourth, or fifth choice.Of the approximately 937,000 votes cast, only 139,459 ballots became "exhausted" by the final round, meaning that only about 15% of voters did not rank either of the final two contenders - former NYPD officer currently serving as Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams and former City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.Ranked-choice voting also had nothing to do with the lackluster showing among further left candidates in the race. Voters were left split after City Comptroller Scott Stringer locked up most of the key progressive endorsements early on, only to have his campaign sink to fifth place. It was Stringer's lack of charisma, unoriginal messaging, and a pair of sexual assault allegations - both of which he denies - that sunk his campaign. Stringer's demise left the progressive wing of the party adrift with minimal options, and it was far too late in the cycle to effectively consolidate around any of them, despite a strong late push from Maya Wiley.© Kena Betancur/Getty Images Former New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang. Kena Betancur/Getty Images 2. Some candidates eventually played strategically, but probably too late in the game. They'll be better next timeKey to Garcia making it until the final round was a gamble she took late in the campaign by appearing at events with Andrew Yang, who finished in fourth. Garcia had won a critical endorsement from The New York Times editorial board but was still running in third place through most of the early rounds. Once Yang was out of the race, enough of his voters ranked Garcia second that she was able to vault over Wiley and compete with Adams for the top spot, ultimately falling fewer than 10,000 votes short. While the Yang campaign did actively strategize around ranked-choice voting to some extent - whether through a big gamble like the Garcia quasi-alliance or by playing pickup basketball with 11th place finisher Paperboy Prince - most of the campaign strategy ended up being more conventional.Garcia wouldn't even fully commit to a true alliance with Yang, and no other candidates experimented with joint campaigning beside them. The next time around, if there's a full campaign calendar instead of months of Zoom forums, mid-to-lower-tier campaigns may embrace forming alliances and coalitions as a low-risk, high-reward strategy. © AP AP 3. Ranked-choice didn't upend the fundamentals of elected politics in New York, but did stave off a costly, laborious runoffAdams won the primary by executing on his campaign's simple but effective formula of winning as many labor endorsements as possible and shoring up a base of outer-borough Black voters, particularly homeowners and union members.His coalition was similar to the one that vaulted outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio over the finish line in 2013, ceding ground in Manhattan and gentrified Brooklyn while running up the score among predominately Black precincts in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.Ranked-choice voting didn't change the fact that a relatively small slice of New York's overall population will have an effective say in their mayor, given Democrats outnumbering Republicans by around seven to one in registrations.However, Adams avoided what would have been a costly runoff under the old system, saving not only his own campaign's money, but also matching funds from the city and other outlays to produce another voting day before Election Day in November.In 2013, de Blasio won the primary and, by extension, the de facto claim to the mayor's office with just 260,473 votes. Adams only got around 253,000 from the first round of voting. Now, he can securely claim the mantle of his party, having secured over half the vote when all was said and done, not a mere plurality. © Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images Democratic New York City mayoral candidate and former NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images 4. Ranked-choice really shines down ballotBesides the top-tier races, the ranked-choice system absolutely bears out looking down ballot.Take, for instance, the open City Council district in Queens' 26th District. There are fifteen contenders for the Democratic nomination in the 26th, all of whom have similar, though not identical, politics.Looking at just the first-round results, in a first-past-the-post system, Julie Won, winner of the primary, would have done so with just 18.5% of the vote, less than a percentage point above her nearest rival, Amit S. Bagga. Just over 3,300 people would have selected the winner of a district representing over 161,000 people. Thanks to the ranked-choice system, after a dozen rounds of reallocating votes, Won remains the victor, but can now claim the seat with a decisive 56% of the vote, beating Bagga by over 13 percentage points. A complicated, complex field simplified with a single trip to the ballot box.The rollout of ranked-choice voting may have been a hassle and unnecessarily stressful in the counting process, but everywhere else, it found a winner in precisely the way voters said they wanted it to back when they passed it in 2019.Read the original article on Business Insider MORE→
> 14 weeks
Jul 7, 2021

 
 
 
1.1%
4 takeaways from New York City's attempt to use ranked choice voting to pick its next mayor
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Article
10607 chars
MSN
The Board of Elections screwed up and the candidates didn't play the system to their advantage until the end. But up and down the ballot, it worked.
© TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images New York City Democratic Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images Ranked-choice voting worked as intended, but its New York City debut didn't go off without a few hitches. Ranked-choice voting is a type of ballot that asks voters to list their choices - In New York's case, five - in their order of preference. When the votes are in, the lowest-ranked candidate has their ballots reallocated to their voters' second choices, and then so on and so forth until someone breaks 50%. This means a second runoff election is unnecessary - the runoff is done instantly - and that the winner with the broadest support eventually wins.For the 2021 mayor race, Democrats had a long list of options, but the most popular candidates were Eric Adams, Maya Wiley, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Scott Stringer, Ray McGuire, Dianne Morales, and Shaun Donovan.Some voters may have found themselves doing more homework than they anticipated ahead of filling out their five choices for mayor in the Democratic primary. Still, the elimination system worked exactly as it was supposed to once it became clear no one would finish the first round as an outright winner with at least 50% of the vote.The real drama and chaos that came with counting the votes was solely the result of an underprepared City Board of Elections, not an inherent feature of the ranked-choice systemGotham voters approved in 2019.1. Ranked-choice worked, but in the process illustrated how divided New York City's Democratic voters areAt a rather unprecedented scale in American politics, ranked-choice voting showed how a divided party could choose a candidate if enough voters indicated they could at least live with their second, third, fourth, or fifth choice.Of the approximately 937,000 votes cast, only 139,459 ballots became "exhausted" by the final round, meaning that only about 15% of voters did not rank either of the final two contenders - former NYPD officer currently serving as Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams and former City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.Ranked-choice voting also had nothing to do with the lackluster showing among further left candidates in the race. Voters were left split after City Comptroller Scott Stringer locked up most of the key progressive endorsements early on, only to have his campaign sink to fifth place. It was Stringer's lack of charisma, unoriginal messaging, and a pair of sexual assault allegations - both of which he denies - that sunk his campaign. Stringer's demise left the progressive wing of the party adrift with minimal options, and it was far too late in the cycle to effectively consolidate around any of them, despite a strong late push from Maya Wiley.© Kena Betancur/Getty Images Former New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang. Kena Betancur/Getty Images 2. Some candidates eventually played strategically, but probably too late in the game. They'll be better next timeKey to Garcia making it until the final round was a gamble she took late in the campaign by appearing at events with Andrew Yang, who finished in fourth. Video: Fmr. presidents tend to keep quiet. Trump's destroying that norm. (MSNBC)Biden antitrust executive order is a signal of administration's priority: Policy analystThe White House on Friday will announce a new executive order aimed at cracking down on anticompetitive practices in Big Tech, labor and numerous other sectors, CNBC’s Ylan Mui reported. The sweeping order, which includes 72 actions and recommendations that involve a dozen federal agencies, is intended to re-shape the thinking around corporate consolidation and antitrust laws. James Pethokoukis, Dewitt Wallace Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, joined "Squawk Box" on Friday to discuss.CNBCHoman blasts Rashida Tlaib over 'defund' push: 'The single dumbest thing I’ve heard any member of Congress say'Former Acting ICE Director Tom Homan slams Rep. Tlaib, D-Mich., over her comments amid border crisisFOX NewsMore suspects arrested in assassination of Haitian presidentMore than two dozen people have now been arrested in connection with the assassination of Jovenel Moise, the president of Haiti, including two Haitian-Americans. NBC’s Gabe Gutierrez reports for TODAY.TODAYGarcia had won a critical endorsement from The New York Times editorial board but was still running in third place through most of the early rounds. Once Yang was out of the race, enough of his voters ranked Garcia second that she was able to vault over Wiley and compete with Adams for the top spot, ultimately falling fewer than 10,000 votes short. While the Yang campaign did actively strategize around ranked-choice voting to some extent - whether through a big gamble like the Garcia quasi-alliance or by playing pickup basketball with 11th place finisher Paperboy Prince - most of the campaign strategy ended up being more conventional.Garcia wouldn't even fully commit to a true alliance with Yang, and no other candidates experimented with joint campaigning beside them. The next time around, if there's a full campaign calendar instead of months of Zoom forums, mid-to-lower-tier campaigns may embrace forming alliances and coalitions as a low-risk, high-reward strategy. © AP AP 3. Ranked-choice didn't upend the fundamentals of elected politics in New York, but did stave off a costly, laborious runoffAdams won the primary by executing on his campaign's simple but effective formula of winning as many labor endorsements as possible and shoring up a base of outer-borough Black voters, particularly homeowners and union members.His coalition was similar to the one that vaulted outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio over the finish line in 2013, ceding ground in Manhattan and gentrified Brooklyn while running up the score among predominately Black precincts in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.Ranked-choice voting didn't change the fact that a relatively small slice of New York's overall population will have an effective say in their mayor, given Democrats outnumbering Republicans by around seven to one in registrations.However, Adams avoided what would have been a costly runoff under the old system, saving not only his own campaign's money, but also matching funds from the city and other outlays to produce another voting day before Election Day in November.In 2013, de Blasio won the primary and, by extension, the de facto claim to the mayor's office with just 260,473 votes. Adams only got around 253,000 from the first round of voting. Now, he can securely claim the mantle of his party, having secured over half the vote when all was said and done, not a mere plurality. © Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images Democratic New York City mayoral candidate and former NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images 4. Ranked-choice really shines down ballotBesides the top-tier races, the ranked-choice system absolutely bears out looking down ballot.Take, for instance, the open City Council district in Queens' 26th District. There are fifteen contenders for the Democratic nomination in the 26th, all of whom have similar, though not identical, politics.Looking at just the first-round results, in a first-past-the-post system, Julie Won, winner of the primary, would have done so with just 18.5% of the vote, less than a percentage point above her nearest rival, Amit S. Bagga. Just over 3,300 people would have selected the winner of a district representing over 161,000 people. Thanks to the ranked-choice system, after a dozen rounds of reallocating votes, Won remains the victor, but can now claim the seat with a decisive 56% of the vote, beating Bagga by over 13 percentage points. A complicated, complex field simplified with a single trip to the ballot box.The rollout of ranked-choice voting may have been a hassle and unnecessarily stressful in the counting process, but everywhere else, it found a winner in precisely the way voters said they wanted it to back when they passed it in 2019.Read the original article on Business Insider MORE→
> 14 weeks
Jul 7, 2021

 
 
 
0%
4th Congressional District results boost calls for ranked-choice voting
msn.com
Article
4642 chars
MSN
Calls for ranked-choice voting in Massachusetts are gaining steam this week after an open-seat congressional primary ended for the second cycle in a row with the winner receiving less than a quarter of the vote. MORE→
Calls for ranked-choice voting in Massachusetts are gaining steam this week after an open-seat congressional primary ended for the second cycle in a row with the winner receiving less than a quarter of the vote. © Provided by Boston Herald BOSTON, MA: September 1, 2020: Voters cast their ballots in the state primary election at the Boston Public Library Copley Square polling station, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff photo by Nicolaus Czarnecki/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald) “That race is the poster child for ranked-choice voting,” Evan Falchuk, said board chairman of the “Yes on 2” campaign that’s working to pass a state ballot initiative on ranked-choice voting this November, about the 4th Congressional District Democratic primary. “You had seven really good candidates, and the winner ends up with 23%,” said Falchuk, a former independent Massachusetts gubernatorial hopeful. “In a democracy, the winner should be the person who gets the majority.” Jake Auchincloss, a Newton city councilor and former Marine, narrowly won the 4th District primary this week with 22.4% of the vote. Second-place finisher Jesse Mermell earned 21.1%, third-place candidate Becky Grossman had 18.1% and no one else got above 12%. All seven of the Democratic candidates expressed support for ranked-choice voting, according to the “Yes on 2” campaign. Mermell quipped in her concession video Friday, “If the ranked-choice voting campaign needs a new face, give me a call.” Also known as “instant-runoff” voting, the ranked-choice system allows voters to rank-order as many candidates as they like. If more than two candidates are running and no candidate receives 50% of the vote, the last-place candidate is eliminated and the ballots that would have gone to them are shifted to each of the voters’ second choices. That process repeats until one candidate wins a majority. Proponents of ranked-choice voting cite both the 4th District this year and the 3rd District race in 2018 — in which U.S. Rep. Niki Tsongas’s decision to retire sparked a 10-way Democratic primary that ended with now-U.S. Rep. Lori Trahan edging Dan Koh 21.7% to 21.5% — as showing need for a system that elects leaders by majority support. “While Jake Auchincloss won in Congressional District 4, he only obtained the support of 23% of the voters while four women who ran to his left won 61%,” said Henry Wortis, spokesman for Our Revolution Massachusetts, a progressive group that backed former Wall Street regulator Ihssane Leckey in that race. “This is why the state needs ranked-choice voting to be truly democratic.” Maine voters approved ranked-choice in 2016 for state and federal races, and the state is set to be the first to use the system in a presidential election. Cambridge uses ranked-choice voting, and Amherst and Easthampton residents have both voted to implement the system. But Lowell voters rejected a nonbinding ballot question on the issue in 2019. Paul Craney, of the conservative Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance, said the ranked-choice system “puts a very unfair burden on the voter to force them to try to guess who the last two candidates will be in the election.” Craney instead favors the nonpartisan election system used by several municipalities, including Boston, which takes the highest vote-getters in a preliminary election regardless of party affiliation and sends them on to a general contest. He said that avoids potential confusion from voters having to rank candidates. “Candidates are not like ice cream flavors,” Craney said. “Their positions are at times a little complex and voters are very smart — they put a lot of thought into what candidates are like.” The “Yes on 2” campaign is backed by a bipartisan coalition that includes former Govs. Bill Weld and Deval Patrick. A recent WBUR/MassINC survey showed that respondents who understood the system supported it by a 15-point margin. But “people who don’t know about it are skeptical,” Falchuk said. “Our job is to just make sure we bring voters the good news about ranked-choice voting and how it helps.” MORE→
> 1 year
Sep 5, 2020

 
 
 
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4th Congressional District results boost calls for ranked-choice voting - Boston Herald
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Article
5054 chars
Boston Herald
Lisa Kashinsky
Calls for ranked-choice voting in Massachusetts are gaining steam this week after an open-seat congressional primary ended for the second cycle in a row with the winner receiving less than a quarter of the vote. MORE→
Massachusetts coronavirus 0.8% positive test rate a record low September 9, 2020 at 6:03 pm BOSTON, MA: September 1, 2020: Voters cast their ballots in the state primary election at the Boston Public Library Copley Square polling station, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff photo by Nicolaus Czarnecki/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald) By Calls for ranked-choice voting in Massachusetts are gaining steam this week after an open-seat congressional primary ended for the second cycle in a row with the winner receiving less than a quarter of the vote. “That race is the poster child for ranked-choice voting,” Evan Falchuk, said board chairman of the “Yes on 2” campaign that’s working to pass a state ballot initiative on ranked-choice voting this November, about the 4th Congressional District Democratic primary. “You had seven really good candidates, and the winner ends up with 23%,” said Falchuk, a former independent Massachusetts gubernatorial hopeful. “In a democracy, the winner should be the person who gets the majority.” Jake Auchincloss, a Newton city councilor and former Marine, narrowly won the 4th District primary this week with 22.4% of the vote. Second-place finisher Jesse Mermell earned 21.1%, third-place candidate Becky Grossman had 18.1% and no one else got above 12%. All seven of the Democratic candidates expressed support for ranked-choice voting, according to the “Yes on 2” campaign. Mermell quipped in her concession video Friday, “If the ranked-choice voting campaign needs a new face, give me a call.” Also known as “instant-runoff” voting, the ranked-choice system allows voters to rank-order as many candidates as they like. If more than two candidates are running and no candidate receives 50% of the vote, the last-place candidate is eliminated and the ballots that would have gone to them are shifted to each of the voters’ second choices. That process repeats until one candidate wins a majority. Proponents of ranked-choice voting cite both the 4th District this year and the 3rd District race in 2018 — in which U.S. Rep. Niki Tsongas’s decision to retire sparked a 10-way Democratic primary that ended with now-U.S. Rep. Lori Trahan edging Dan Koh 21.7% to 21.5% — as showing need for a system that elects leaders by majority support. “While Jake Auchincloss won in Congressional District 4, he only obtained the support of 23% of the voters while four women who ran to his left won 61%,” said Henry Wortis, spokesman for Our Revolution Massachusetts, a progressive group that backed former Wall Street regulator Ihssane Leckey in that race. “This is why the state needs ranked-choice voting to be truly democratic.” Maine voters approved ranked-choice in 2016 for state and federal races, and the state is set to be the first to use the system in a presidential election. Cambridge uses ranked-choice voting, and Amherst and Easthampton residents have both voted to implement the system. But Lowell voters rejected a nonbinding ballot question on the issue in 2019. Paul Craney, of the conservative Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance, said the ranked-choice system “puts a very unfair burden on the voter to force them to try to guess who the last two candidates will be in the election.” Craney instead favors the nonpartisan election system used by several municipalities, including Boston, which takes the highest vote-getters in a preliminary election regardless of party affiliation and sends them on to a general contest. He said that avoids potential confusion from voters having to rank candidates. “Candidates are not like ice cream flavors,” Craney said. “Their positions are at times a little complex and voters are very smart — they put a lot of thought into what candidates are like.” The “Yes on 2” campaign is backed by a bipartisan coalition that includes former Govs. Bill Weld and Deval Patrick. A recent WBUR/MassINC survey showed that respondents who understood the system supported it by a 15-point margin. But “people who don’t know about it are skeptical,” Falchuk said. “Our job is to just make sure we bring voters the good news about ranked-choice voting and how it helps.” MORE→
> 1 year
Sep 5, 2020

 
 
 
19.1%
5/11/21 Rank Choice Voting Presentation
youtube.com
Video
1:25:26
Gale A. Brewer, Manhattan Borough President
Questions about Rank Choice Voting (RCV) in June’s primaries? How does it work? Why is it important to know? Join me and NYU McSilver Institute, NYC Campaign Finance Board, Rank The Vote NYC for a virtual info session and get answers to all your questions! bit.ly/RCVManhattanInfo #rankchoicevoting #rankthevote #nycprimary MORE→
> 22 weeks
May 12, 2021

 
 
 
0%
5 Reasons You Should Register to Vote
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Video
0:02:37
Rachel Epstein
The voting process will be used in the NYC primaries this June and is slowly being implemented across the U.S.
> 24 weeks
Apr 30, 2021

 
 
 
0%
5 things to know about the District 15 special election
cityandstateny.com
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City & State NY
Residents are hitting the polls in the city’s third-ever special election under the new ranked-choice voting system to choose a replacement for Rep.
> 30 weeks
Mar 18, 2021

 
 
 
0%
5 things to know today: Transgender bill, Climate performance, Ranked-choice voting, Prep time, Poachers caught
inforum.com
Article
5837 chars
INFORUM
Eric Bolin
A rundown of some of the best stories found on InForum.
1. North Dakota Senate sends transgender athlete bill to governor's desk North Dakota's transgender athlete bill cleared a final legislative hurdle with the approval of Senate lawmakers on Thursday, April 15, sending the proposal to Gov. Doug Burgum's desk. If signed into law, House Bill 1298 would restrict transgender athletes in K-12 sports in North Dakota from competing alongside competitors of their identifying gender. The Senate approved the bill in a 27-20 vote on Thursday after the House endorsed it by a wide margin the day before. Read more from The Forum's Adam Willis 2. 'Report card' on Walz's climate performance gives him low marks listen live watch live Environmental leaders and organizations say Gov. Tim Walz isn’t doing enough for Minnesota’s climate. The North Star Chapter of the Sierra Club, along with other environmental organizations, issued a mid-term “report card” on Walz’s climate policies. The report was critical of Walz’s proposed budgets on transit, and inaction on blocking Enbridge’s Line 3 project that will transport oil from Canada through Minnesota. The line, which would cross 200 bodies of water, including lakes, wetlands and rivers, and Native American tribal land where wild rice is grown, has sparked ongoing protests. Read more from Forum News Service's John Molseed 3. Minnesota Democrats prioritize ranked-choice voting in election debates Senate Democrats on Thursday, April 15, said they would again push to expand the use of ranked-choice voting to limit the impacts of "spoiler" candidates and make sure voters have their voices heard at the ballot box. A group of DFL senators during a virtual news conference said that they would continue their efforts to place the bill in a larger state government bill in the Senate or during conference committee conversations about the proposal. Five Minnesota cities — St. Paul, Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Minnetonka and Bloomington — have enacted ranked-choice voting for local elections. The Senate DFL plan would make ranked-choice voting the standard statewide for primary and general elections for state and federal offices. Municipal governments would then be able to decide if they want to allow the new system for local elections. Read more from Forum News Service's Dana Ferguson 4. Teachers union, Dilworth-Glyndon-Felton schools clash in court over extra prep time A Minnesota teachers union has taken Dilworth-Glyndon-Felton Public Schools to court in an attempt to force the district to provide additional teacher preparation time that Gov. Tim Walz called for in his Nov. 5 emergency executive order related to distance learning. Education Minnesota, the union representing pre-K-12 teachers and staff throughout the state, said in court documents that originally an extra 30 minutes were provided as per the executive order, but when the district returned to in-person instruction, the preparation time was eliminated despite some students continuing distance learning. Read more from The Forum's C.S. Hagen 5. Landowners, hunters led North Dakota wardens to poachers who illegally took antlers from 10 deer In October 2019, a landowner found a dead whitetail deer near Valley City that had its antlers removed. Less than a week later, another deer without antlers was discovered nearby. Hunters reported more deer carcasses in the following weeks. All had their antlers or heads removed. No meat was taken, and the bodies were left to rot. A months-long investigation led game wardens to four men who were convicted of a long list of misdemeanors in recent months connected to poaching at least 10 deer, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department said this week. Read more from The Forum's April Baumgarten MORE→
> 26 weeks
Apr 16, 2021
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