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LETTER: Concern over ranked-choice voting and Minneapolis
hometownsource.com
Article
192 chars
hometownsource.com
David Paulson Minnetonka
ContextualWeb
To the Editor:
Copyright © 2021 at Sun Newspapers. Digital dissemination of this content without prior written consent is a violation of federal law and may be subject to legal action.
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Maine's 'Trump Before Trump' Launches a Comeback Bid
usnews.com
Article
135 chars
U.S. News & World Report
BingNews
Paul LePage, a pugnacious Republican, says he hopes to clean up his act. But will it get him back in the governor's mansion?
Paul LePage
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Lawmakers advance runoff election legislation
wyofile.com
Article
10970 chars
WyoFile
Nick Reynolds
BingNews
After considering three election reform proposals, legislative committee favors run-off option.
Wyoming lawmakers advanced a proposal Thursday to shift the state’s elections to a runoff system. Conservative activists favor runoffs as a way to avoid the type of vote-splitting they believe has helped elevate more moderate candidates in Republican primaries. The Joint Committee on Corporations, Elections and Political Subdivisions voted 7-6 to advance the proposal, which was sponsored by Rep. Chip Neiman (R-Hulett). This came roughly three months after the committee soundly rejected a similar proposal. At that meeting, committee members voted to draft bills to create either an open primary or a ranked-choice voting system. This time, however, members eschewed those proposals for a runoff option following contentious debates between Wyoming Republican Party officials, lawmakers and Democratic activists. Rep. Dan Zwonitzer (R-Cheyenne), who expressed concerns with the potential implications of a move to a runoff election, was the tie-breaking vote. Eliminating crossover voting Pressure to reimagine Wyoming’s election system ramped up following the 2018 governor’s race. In that election, Mark Gordon won a five-way Republican primary with roughly one-third of the vote. Half of the vote was split between Harriet Hageman and Foster Friess, both considered to be more conservative candidates. Friess, who finished more than 9,000 votes behind Gordon, blamed Democratic voters switching parties on the day of his election for his loss. (Numbers released by the Secretary of State’s office following the vote showed that the impact of crossover voting on the 2018 election was not enough to change the election’s outcome.) In the ensuing years, activists in the Wyoming Republican Party have pushed for legislation to limit the trend of crossover voting in Wyoming’s elections. In recent months, a runoff system has emerged as a centerpiece of the Wyoming GOP’s policy objectives as party activists have sought to avoid vote- splitting in the race to defeat U.S. Rep Liz Cheney. A runoff proposal brought in the 2021 legislative session failed. Former President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., had attempted on Twitter to rally lawmakers in support of the measure. Enthusiasm for runoff elections, however, has not ebbed. Neiman revived the idea with his bill proposal Thursday. Though colleagues chastised Neiman for drafting a pledge to support his runoff legislation ahead of a June meeting in Cheyenne, the Wyoming House Freedom Caucus — which Neiman is a member of — released a statement on “election integrity” supportive of his runoff bill. The state party has also advocated for its passage. Differing approaches When they rejected Neiman’s proposal in June, lawmakers cited county clerks’ and the Wyoming Secretary of State’s assertions that such a system would be next to impossible to implement before the 2022 election. Lawmakers would still be in the process of redrawing district lines based on the new U.S. Census, LSO staff told lawmakers, and without an amendment to the Constitution to change the deadlines, the timing of the election and redistricting would not match up. County clerks — who administer elections on the local level — would also face the challenge of carrying out redistricting and an election simultaneously, the Wyoming County Clerk’s Association told lawmakers, which would be too heavy a lift. Runoff elections were also expected to be administratively and financially burdensome, state and local elections officials said. Not only would clerks’ offices be required to administer an additional election, but the state would also have to foot an estimated $1.3 million bill to carry out that election, the Wyoming Secretary of State’s Office said. However, the Wyoming Republican Party declared election reform ahead of the 2022 Republican Primary to be their “No. 1 priority,” both in public statements and comments to lawmakers. “We want to see 50% plus one, clear winners, to represent us in these offices,” Wyoming Republican Party Chairman Frank Eathorne said in Sheridan Thursday. To accommodate these concerns, members drafted several alternative proposals to rebuild the state’s elections system to ensure a victor emerges with the clear approval of a majority of voters, which members considered on Thursday. One proposal would have created an “open primary” system in Wyoming, which would eliminate the requirement for candidates to declare a party at the primary stage and ensure only the top two vote-getters advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. While the least expensive alternative presented, lawmakers tabled the proposal over concerns it could diminish the influence of political parties, which many lawmakers said serve a critical role in the state’s electoral processes. A second proposal would have established a “ranked-choice” voting system. Deployed by the Wyoming Democratic Party in its 2020 caucuses , ranked-choice voting offers a means to rank candidates on the ballot and can trigger an “instant runoff” to identify the most popular candidate in the instance that one candidate does not receive a majority. “It’s a caucus, but on paper,” Nina Hebert, a Democratic Party official who helped orchestrate that caucus, said during the meeting. Republican pressure Ultimately, the Wyoming GOP got what it lobbied for Thursday. Lawmakers soundly defeated ranked-choice voting and advanced Neiman’s runoff bill after amending it to take effect in 2024 and moving that it be put “to the people.” Days before the vote, the state party urged members on social media to attend the committee meeting and voice their opposition to ranked-choice voting. At the the meeting, Wyoming Republican Party leadership and supporters overwhelmed a limited number of left-leaning activists in the room who were organized by the Sheridan County Democrats. Those lobbying in favor of the runoff bill included Eathorne, Wyoming GOP Vice Chair Dave Holland, Wyoming’s Republican National Committeeman Corey Steinmetz, Uinta County State Committeeman Karl Allred and Carbon County Republican Party Chairman Joey Correnti. In a presentation to lawmakers, Steinmetz said a county clerk in Maine told him the paperwork produced by ranked-choice voting there was overwhelming and elderly voters struggled with it. He added the clerk raised concerns about the financial cost too, and that it could sow distrust in elections by causing confusion. “What happens when we sow distrust in our elections? [People] do not bother to vote,” Steinmetz said. “I don’t think that’s our goal, to encourage people not to vote.” A comprehensive study of Maine county clerks’ experiences with ranked choice voting showed the administrative burdens to be minimal, its cost negligible and public support high. Despite a late amendment to make ranked-choice voting optional at the municipal level only, lawmakers defeated the measure by an 8-5 margin. Lawmakers did pass a retooled version of Neiman’s runoff bill, however. Though Neiman told lawmakers he had worked with county clerks to assuage their concerns with his initial bill — committee members still expressed reservations. Several lawmakers expressed concerns that the initial primary election in May would come too quickly on the heels of the legislative session, creating the potential for legislators to “campaign from the floor” of the Wyoming Capitol and potentially, give themselves an unfair advantage. “I worry that this is just going to open [elections] up to more money, a lot of it from out of state and from undisclosed means,” Kris Korfanta, a Sheridan County Democrat who works with the anti-dark-money group, Wyoming Promise, told lawmakers. “It’s also going to take representatives from the people’s work. They’re going to be more concerned about raising money for the election, take us away from a citizen legislature, and it will prevent people from running who can’t afford to get the money.” Wyoming Republican Party officials repeatedly reminded lawmakers that runoff elections are the party’s top priority ahead of the 2022 elections. Eathorne said members of the GOP would “be watching which legislators are supporting and which are opposing” the runoff bill, drawing a harsh rebuke from former Republican lawmaker Bruce Burns. “I get concerned when I see the chairman of the Republican Party sit up here and tell you that they’re going to see who’s for it and who’s against it,” Burns said. “Any legislator who is craven enough to change their vote because of intimidation tactics doesn’t deserve to be reelected.” Implications Some expressed concern about the implications of the bill should it formally become law. Zwonitzer, who teaches political science, raised concerns about the prospect of “earned media.” Zwonitzer and several commenters said they believed the bill could result in lawmakers taking advantage of the abbreviated and traditionally yeoman-like budget session to bolster their chances for re-election, either by trying to get into their hometown press or doing daily radio updates as a means to gain advantage over their opponents. “It fundamentally alters how the budget session operates,” he said. Robert Davidson, a member of the Sheridan County Democratic Party and former election judge, believes the GOP’s push to change voting laws in Wyoming is not to ensure election integrity, but to exert greater influence over the elections themselves, he said. “Let’s say they get some of the reforms passed into law and, in ‘24 and ‘26, this faction within the Republican Party doesn’t get the result they want,” Davidson said. “I really wonder what they’re going to do then.” MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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What is Ranked Choice Voting?
youtube.com
Video
0:02:40
Babbling Bard
https://vote.nyc/ http://weare400.com/
34 weeks
Feb 21, 2021

 
 
 
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Four dozen lawmakers endorse Question 2
wwlp.com
Article
237 chars
WWLP
Andres Vargas are cosponsors of a ranked-choice voting bill (H 719) that stalled out on Beacon Hill, triggering the ballot effort ... Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved.
> 1 year
Sep 22, 2020

 
 
 
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If incarcerated people had been able to vote, the Attica killings may never have happened
nydailynews.com
Article
5254 chars
nydailynews.com
Soffiyah Elijah
BingNews
It’s a bright, bustling Saturday morning in the heart of Harlem on 116th St. and Lenox Ave, also known as Malcolm X Boulevard. People queue up for the food pantry giveaway outside the Mosque, while… MORE→
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> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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AP source: Trump to endorse GOP challenger to Cheney
seattletimes.com
Article
140 chars
Seattle Times
BingNews
Former President Donald Trump has chosen a favored candidate in his bid to unseat Rep. Liz Cheney, one of his most vocal critics
Donald Trump
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
bangordailynews.com
Article
1969 chars
Bangor Daily News
Michael Shepherd
ContextualWeb
Rep. Kyle Bailey is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system.
AUGUSTA, Maine — Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, said he was leaving the seat “due to an exciting professional opportunity that has arisen recently.” He easily won the 2020 race to succeed his husband, former Rep. Andrew McLean, D-Gorham, in a solidly Democratic district covering parts of Gorham and Scarborough. Similarly, McLean left his seat ahead of last year’s election to take a job after graduating from law school. Former state Sen. Jim Boyle, D-Gorham, who briefly ran for governor in the 2018 Democratic primary will run for the seat in a special election, the House Democratic campaign arm announced in a Friday statement. Party nominees for the seat must be picked at a local caucus after the secretary of state’s office announces the special election. The Legislature is not expected to return to Augusta in 2021, so Bailey’s resignation will have no short-term effect on House business. After he leaves, the chamber will have 79 Democrats, 65 Republicans, four independents and one Libertarian. Another open seat in Augusta will be filled after a November race between Democrat Raegan LaRochelle and Republican James Orr. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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Easthampton to have ranked-choice voting for mayor
westernmassnews.com
Article
331 chars
WesternMassNews.com
Ryan Trowbridge
ContextualWeb
EASTHAMPTON, MA (WGGB/WSHM) -- Election day less than three weeks away and voters in Easthampton will have ranked choice voting to decide the mayoral race.
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3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Easthampton to hold ranked-choice voting info sessions
gazettenet.com
Article
2536 chars
Daily Hampshire Gazette
Brian Steele
Newscatcher
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election.The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on... MORE→
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election. The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on Thursday, Oct. 21, at 11 a.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 6 p.m. Ray Spaulding, treasurer of the Friends of the Easthampton Council on Aging, said each of the masked indoor gatherings can accommodate 23 people plus the two presenters who will explain the voting process. Those who wish to attend must make a reservation by calling (413) 527-6151, ext. 0. The Nov. 2 election will be the first time in the city’s history that ranked-choice voting is used, following the approval of a ballot question in 2019. Voters will be asked to give each candidate a rank — 1, 2, 3, etc. — and winners are determined after multiple rounds of counting voters’ preferences. Ranked-choice is only used in races with one seat, such as the mayor’s race, and not for positions like City Council at-large in which multiple winners are declared. There are three candidates for mayor on the ballot – Eric Berzins, incumbent Nicole LaChapelle, and Keith Routhier — and a fourth, Donald Torrey, has launched a write-in campaign. Since there is only one City Council seat per ward, the winner will be chosen by ranked-choice voting, but because every incumbent is running for reelection unopposed, the rankings are unlikely to become a factor in determining the winners this year. “Really, ranked-choice voting doesn’t play into that race this year because there’s no competition for the seats,” Spaulding, an election worker for the past 10 years, said. Voters are not required to rank every candidate. “Whoever they want to vote for, if they don’t want to use ranked-choice voting, they put number one,” Spaulding said. All precincts will vote at Easthampton High School, 70 Williston Ave. Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters can request a mail-in ballot by downloading and submitting a form on the Secretary of State’s office or by calling the city clerk’s office at 413-529-1400, ext. 460. Brian Steele can be reached at bsteele@gazettenet.com. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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Green Party of California opposes the recall and endorses Green, Dan Kapelovitz
gp.org
Article
5374 chars
www.gp.org
BingNews
The Green Party of California OPPOSES the Gubernatorial Recall Election and endorses Green Party candidate Dan Kapelovitz for Governor after delegates from active county Green Parties participated in a vote following a six-week discussion period. Vote by September 14 on the Gubernatorial Recall Election: Ballot Question #1: VOTE NO ON RECALL Ballot Question #2: VOTE FOR Green Party's DAN KAPELOVITZ MORE→
SAN FRANCISCO - The Green Party of California OPPOSES the Gubernatorial Recall Election and endorses Green Party candidate Dan Kapelovitz for Governor after delegates from active county Green Parties participated in a vote following a six-week discussion period. Ballot Question #1: VOTE NO ON RECALL Ballot Question #2: VOTE FOR Green Party's DAN KAPELOVITZ Green Party of California https://www.cagreens.org Press Release September 8, 2021 SACRAMENTO, CA - The Green Party of California voted overwhelmingly both to vote no on the recall of Gov. Gavin Newsom and to endorse Green Party member Dan Kapelovitz as his replacement should the recall vote pass. Dan Kapelovitz is one of many former Bernie Sanders supporters who have joined the Green Party since 2016. He has a long record of grassroots activism, showing that for decades he has been aligned with the 10 Key Values of the Green Party. An attorney who also teaches law at the People’s College of Law in Los Angeles, his clients are mainly poor people caught up in the criminal justice system, as well as defenders of animal rights. More information about his campaign can be found online at https://kapelovitz.com . "I oppose this recall. Governor Newsom and the Democratic Party have recklessly endangered the residents of this state by strong-arming all arguably qualified Democrats into not taking part in the race to potentially replace him, thus leaving the field to far-right Republicans. Should this desperate gamble to persuade Californians to vote no on the recall fail, I am the progressive candidate most able to win, to govern effectively, and to pursue a strong reform agenda," said Dan Kapelovitz. "A vote for my Green candidacy can be a transformational vote for more choice and more voice for Californians, via ranked-choice voting and proportional representation elections. These critically needed reforms would lead to a viable multi-party system for California, giving more people in our state a seat at the table of our democracy." Greens oppose the recall because the lack of ranked-choice voting or a required runoff in this recall election creates the potential for a replacement to be elected by only a tiny minority of the voting public, and the candidates receiving the most attention are no better than Newsom and in many cases, far worse. "The vote to oppose the recall is by no means a statement of support for Newsom," said Laura Wells , official spokesperson for the Green Party of California, and a former candidate for Governor herself in 2010. "Newsom has had Democratic Party super-majorities in both houses of the legislature and still his actions and inactions have continually gone against Californians’ progressive values. During this pandemic, he has thwarted Californians’ ability to receive unemployment benefits and receive rent subsidies. He has failed to address the climate crisis, stop fracking, hold PG&E accountable for its continued disaster inducing incompetence, or require it to compensate victims in a timely and appropriate manner, and he has failed to raise billions to fight the climate crisis by imposing a severance tax on oil and gas extraction, as is standard in other states." "Despite having a budget surplus and despite the pandemic, Newsom and his supermajorities stunningly betrayed Californian voters by delaying consideration of a single-payer healthcare bill until sometime after 2021," said Wells. "He also vetoed a measure that would have enhanced democracy and broadened representation by allowing cities across California to use ranked-choice voting in local elections." Kapelovitz' choice to feature ranked-choice voting and proportional representation continues the Green Party's longstanding mission to restore accountability and authentic choice to California's electoral process. "We need these democracy enhancing reforms to end one-party rule, and give progressives a voice in Sacramento not chained to a party co-opted and corrupted by corporate donations and the 1%," said Greg Jan , coordinator of the Statewide Candidates Subcommittee. "A vote for Kapelovitz on September 14, and for Green candidates in next June's primary election, sends a strong message that Californians embrace progressive policies and electoral reform." The recall election ballots must be postmarked no later than election day, Tuesday, September 14, 2021. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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480x360
What is Ranked Choice Voting?
youtube.com
Video
0:00:28
YouTube
Voter Choice Arizona
BingVideo
Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) is a small change to the way we vote that produces big improvements to the election process. On the ballot you rank candidates in the order you prefer (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). If your first-choice candidate does not receive enough votes, your vote counts towards your second choice and so on, until a candidate has a ... MORE→
3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Who likes swag? Help spread the word about ranked choice voting by wearing it! Visit the shop through our menu items at the top of the group!
reddit.com
Video
reddit
BingVideo
113 members in the RankTheVoteNebraska community. A place to discuss Ranked Choice Voting and how it can be implemented here in the Cornhusker …
> 6 weeks
Sep 4, 2021

 
 
 
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Bloomington Today: The BUZZ September 1
youtube.com
Video
0:04:21
YouTube
Cityofbloomingtonmn
BingVideo
Learn about the 2020 Census results, a new COVID-19 testing site in Bloomington and the results of the Ranked Choice Voting Mock Election.
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
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Report: Trump to endorse GOP challenger to Cheney
whas11.com
Article
152 chars
WHAS11 News
BingNews
The endorsement marks Trump’s most significant to date as he works to maintain his status as GOP kingmaker and make good on his threat to exact revenge.
> 5 weeks
Sep 9, 2021

 
 
 
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480x360
Ranked Choice Voting Ice Cream Toppings
youtube.com
Video
0:02:21
YouTube
Rank The Vote Ohio
BingVideo
Rank the Vote Ohio had a House Party to give a small group of Ohioans an experience of Ranked Choice Voting. See their reactions as they vote for ice cream toppings.
3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked Choice Voting - BentonBetterBallot.com
msn.com
Video
0:01:44
Many American voters have long been disillusioned with the two-party system but see voting for a third party as throwing their vote away. This is because the U.S. largely uses a “first-past-the-post” voting system where the candidate with the most votes wins, making it nearly impossible for third parties to break away from the fringe. Faced ... MORE→
> 51 weeks
Oct 22, 2020

 
 
 
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The League Presents - Susan Millinger Ranked Choice Voting
vimeo.com
Video
0:27:45
NewTV
Marcia Johnson talks with Susan Millinger about Ranked Choice Voting in Mass.
> 50 weeks
Oct 26, 2020

 
 
 
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Your guide to ranked-choice voting
democracyworks.simplecast.com
Podcast
0:38:13
Democracy Works
Ranked-choice voting has been in the news a lot lately. It was adopted in New York City’s November 2019 election, used for the first time in U.S. Congressional elections last year, and will be the method by which at least a few states choose a Democratic primary candidate in 2020.But, what is it? How does it work? And, is it more democratic than the single-vote method we’re used to? This week’s guest has answers to all of those questions.Burt L. Monroe is Liberal Arts Professor Political Science, Social Data Analytics, and Informatics at Penn State and Director of the university’s Center for Social Data Analytics. He says ranked-choice voting is generally a good thing for democracy, but not entirely without problems of its own. We also talk about bullet voting, donkey voting, and other types of voting that have been tried around the world.As Michael and Chris discuss, ranked-choice voting falls into a category of grassroots organizing around pro-democracy initiatives like gerrymandering and open primaries. These efforts signal a frustration with the status quo and a desire to make the rules of democracy more fair and equitable.If you enjoy our show, please take a minute to leave a rating or review in your podcast app. Thank you!Additional InformationFairvote, an advocacy group for ranked-choice voting and election reformBurt’s Google Scholar listingRelated EpisodesThe case for open primariesOne state’s fight for fair mapsInterview Highlights[6:52] What is ranked-choice voting?Ranked-choice voting is used to describe a lot of different systems, but mostly what people mean is something that’s usually referred to as instant run-off.  In a traditional runoff election, you vote as you normally would and if no one gets a majority, everybody but the top two is eliminated and you come back in  four weeks or six weeks or eight weeks and vote again and somebody has a majority.Ranked-choice voting does that all at one time. Voters rank the candidates in a pure system from first choice to last choice and the votes are tallied based on the first choices and if no one has a majority, then the last place candidate is eliminated and the voters who had voted for that candidate first, their vote is transferred to their second candidate. And it goes on and on until there’s a majority.[8:33] Does a voter have to rank all candidates on a ballot?The only place I know of that requires you to rank everybody is Australia, which uses it for their national elections. In most places you can rank as few as you want. If you rank only one, that’s called bullet voting. Most of the U.S. variations of this, you can only rank up to a certain number. The New York one that just passed is five, I believe San Francisco’s three. But you can vote for as many as you like, just as long as you don’t vote more than one for first or second and so on.[11:24] Does ranked-choice voting change the way a candidate campaigns?This is one of the key points of contention about how this system works. One of the main arguments for it is that it encourages candidates to try to broaden their appeal so they can get those second choice, third choice, fourth choice. And that seems to be largely what happens. Although, there are examples where it didn’t. Fiji uses ranked-choice voting and had a lot of antagonistic ethnic based voting. In that case, the electorate was so polarized that more extreme candidates were able to get more first choices and more moderate candidates were punished and didn’t get enough first choices to stay in the race.[14:26] How does ranked-choice voting account for third-party candidates?If voters can be more sincere about their true preference for Jill Stein or Ralph Nader or what have you, but those candidates don’t make the cut of on the first choices, their second choices are presumably the one- the more moderate that’s closer to them. It’s very handy for elections that have lots and lots of candidates. For example, New York is anticipating 17 candidates in one of their races coming up for advocate, And so you can imagine if you’re just picking your first choice, with 17 candidates somebody could win with 5% of the vote.[16:18] Does ranked-choice voting give an advantage to low-information voters?Yeah, that’s definitely a thing. Even in our current system, there’s spoiled ballots that people fill out wrong. But there two ways I’m familiar with that this happens. One is bullet voting that I mentioned earlier, which is just voting for one candidate. Those votes are more likely to be, I think the term they use is exhausted. That is, their candidate gets eliminated and they don’t have a second choice for it to pass to so their vote isn’t used in the final tally. The other one I’m familiar with is Australia where everyone has to fill out he full ranking and there you get a phenomenon called donkey voting  where people rank rank just in the order they appear on the ballot paper. So if they’re alphabetical, they vote alphabetical.[17:58] Is there an impact on voter turnout?It’s always hard to attribute increased turnout in a particular election to one thing because many thing change, but in San Francisco there was dramatic turnout raised in the first election that used this. In some districts, it went from like 17% to over 50%. So really dramatic changes when there wasn’t much obvious else that was different about the election other than the ranked-choice option. The argument is that people want to be able to express themselves and this helps people who might otherwise want to vote for a candidate that doesn’t have a chance or they think doesn’t have a chance.[28:10] Is ranked-choice voting more democratic?I think the system we have now, there’s so many ways it can elect somebody that a lot of people don’t want. This is a pretty easy change to make to keep some bad things from happening and so I think it’s pretty easy to advocate for. MORE→
> 1 year
Nov 18, 2019

 
 
 
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Column: Say yes to ranked-choice voting - MetroWest Daily News
metrowestdailynews.com
Article
64 chars
MetroWest Daily News
> 1 year
Aug 1, 2020

 
 
 
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Maine high court clears way for ranked-choice voting in presidential contest
pressherald.com
Video
The court overturned a ruling that would have placed a "people's veto" referendum on the November ballot, thereby blocking the use of ranked-choice voting in the presidential contest.
> 1 year
Oct 1, 2020

 
 
 
1.3%
Learn about ranked choice voting at 'Rank Your Beer!' fundraiser Sept. 20
dailyherald.com
Article
2337 chars
Chicago Daily Herald
Letters To The Editor
Newscatcher
The League of Women Voters of Roselle-Bloomingdale will host the annual membership kickoff at the "Rank Your Beer!" fundraising event on Monday, Sept. 20, from 6 to 9 p. m. in the outdoor beer garden at Pollyanna Brewing Co., 245 E. Main St. in Roselle. The evening will include a presentation entitled, "Ranked Choice Voting -- What It Is and Why It Works." Gary Schotz, Speakers Bureau FairVote Illinois, will share his thoughts about why voters like Ranked Choice Voting in the states that have tried it. His brief presentation will be followed by an informal question-and-answer session with League members and guests. Andrew Szilva, president of FairVote Illinois, also will join for the evening. As part of the event, the League will conduct a "mock election" using a flight of four Pollyanna craft beers. Attendees will taste their beers and use FairVote's rankit. vote to tabulate the voting rounds and publish results of the ranked choice beers. New York City is the 22nd jurisdiction to use Ranked Choice Voting and the learning curve is flattening quickly as more states, counties, and municipalities implement it around the country. FairVote is currently working to bring Ranked Choice Voting to Evanston, Illinois. Set aside Monday, Sept. 20, to join the League for the Fall Membership Kickoff and learn how Ranked Choice Voting works in a unique and fun way! The cost for this Fall League fundraising event is $25 and it includes one flight of four different beers and appetizers. Formed in 2012, the League of Women Voters of Roselle/Bloomingdale provides information on topics that impact our local, state, and federal government. The League works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. With over 100 years of experience and having grown to more than 800 local and state affiliations, the League is one of America's most trusted grassroots organizations. The League does not support, endorse or oppose political candidates. Membership in the League is open to people ages 16 and older. For more information on the League of Women Voters of the United States, visit www. lwv. org, or the League of Women Voters of Illinois, visit www. lwvil. org. Learn more about rank choice voting by visiting FairVote Illinois at www. fairvoteillinois. org. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 9, 2021

 
 
 
0.7%
County Board Candidates Talk Ranked-Choice Voting
arlnow.com
Article
8532 chars
ARLnow
Newscatcher
Ranked-choice voting is supported by all four candidates for County Board, according to their comments at an Arlington Committee of 100 candidate forum held last night (Wednesday). The event was the first candidate forum of the fall general election season. Support is strong among the three independent candidates — Audrey Clement, Mike Cantwell and Adam Theo — who want to unseat Democrat incumbent Takis Karantonis. He won a special election in 2020 and his seat is now up for a full four-year term. Theo, a Libertarian, is the most recent addition to the ballot after officially launching his campaign this week. While all four support ranked choice voting, the reform would not be ready for the upcoming Nov. 2 election, as the county is still hammering out the logistics of the system. Dismayed at the pace of implementation, the independents said the reform would reveal public support for candidates like them and add political diversity to the County Board. "I've spent a lot of my free time promoting ranked choice voting in Virginia," said Cantwell, who became the vice president of Fair Vote Virginia, which advocates for ranked choice voting in Virginia, in 2019. "I went to Richmond in February 2020 and lobbied to bring it to Virginia. At that time, to the surprise of many, the legislature passed bills 506 and 1103, which allowed it in [Arlington] and the rest of Virginia. Since that time, [the county has] taken very little action to implement that new law." Theo also criticized the lack of movement on implementing the new voting system and educating voters about it. "It would've been awesome to have the logo-picking determined by ranked choice voting," he said. "That would've been a great way to educate the public. Here we are, waiting for the county to proceed and provide results. I have a lot of skepticism for the County Board's real willingness to push forward real reform. It puts their own positions, jobs, in jeopardy." Karantonis said he is on the record supporting ranked-choice voting and voted to fund an initiative to test it out. "I put money where my mouth is," he said. "I think this is a great improvement in democracy." During the forum the four candidates articulated their positions housing and on Arlington County's goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. Both Karantonis and Theo said "affordable housing" is the biggest issue facing Arlington. "I've been a housing advocate from day one," Karantonis said. "The first thing my wife and I experienced [when moving here] was not being able to find housing, not having choices… Arlington is a community that looks back to a solid record of planning carefully for housing, of matching development with assets like transportation, schools and natural resources. We need to bundle these to support the creation of new housing choices because displacement is a real thing." "[Housing affordability] poses the problem of pricing out the elderly, low-income, immigrant and disabled people who are clinging on as it is already," he said. "The number of housing units built in this county is horrifyingly low." But he took a jab at the County Board for talking about affordable housing and posing for photos at new developments, while not doing more to prioritize affordability. He spoke favorably of the Missing Middle Housing Study, a county-led effort to see if single-family home areas should be rezoned for more types of moderate-density homes, as a means to increase housing options for the middle-class. Cantwell said he worries about affordability both in terms of housing and taxes. "I think the biggest problem facing Arlington is runaway spending and taxes and lack of accountability in county government, [which] stems from lack of political competition," Cantwell said. "I'm for affordable housing, but I question the outcomes of $300 million spent on a government-run affordable housing program… I think most Arlingtonians are interested in finding a market rate affordable housing place to live in, but not that many are interested in being part of government run program, where they have to submit tax returns, W-2s [and other] bureaucracy." "A far better solution is to repurpose unrented luxury units in the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor to moderate income housing," she said. (A subsequent NYU study found little link between neighborhood gentrification and displacement of low-income residents, at least in New York City.) Another point of agreement? Skepticism that Arlington will be carbon neutral by 2050, a goal outlined in the 2019 Community Energy Plan. "I don't think we're in a place where we will achieve the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050," Karantonis said. "For me, it's very important to make it a whole-government action item… I do believe all new construction should be benchmarked to actually be compliant in a reasonable time horizon. It's very frustrating, site plan after site plan, to extract benefits from developers at a pace that I'm not very satisfied with." Cantwell said he wants to see high school students using public transit, which would increase ridership and teach the next generation to use transit. He also reiterated his support for expanding the county auditor's office. "Part of the reasoning is to see if the money that they spend is actually resulting in outcomes they desire. Many programs sound good but don't produce results they're aimed at," he said. Clement said the goals of the CEP are "prescriptive rather than pragmatic," and won't come to pass as long as Arlington is powered mostly by Dominion Energy and Washington Gas, and as long as Virginia isn't passing stringent mandates requiring the utility companies increase their production of renewable energy, also known as a renewable energy portfolio standard. "I will stop misleading the public about the potential of being net zero by 2050, and instead lobby legislature to adopt a mandatory renewable energy portfolio standard and authorize municipalities to enter into power-purchase agreements with third parties," she said. Theo emphasized switching the county's vehicle fleet over to electric vehicles and using public-private partnerships, such as the program that the county uses to match businesses looking to go solar with private funds willing to support the investment. He also lauded the joint Arlington-Amazon solar farm. School Board candidate Mary Kadera, meanwhile, fielded questions from committee members about ways Arlington Public Schools can collaborate with county government, ways APS can improve outreach to non-English-speaking families, as well as systemic racism and special education. Her opponent, Major Mike Webb, was not present. Kadera, who received the Democratic endorsement, offered a slew of ideas, from having middle and high school students ride public transit and co-locating county and school facilities to accommodate growth, to using text messages and holding forums at churches and other community hubs to reach non-English speaking families. When it came to special education, she said APS has the right tools but isn't implementing them in every school equally: "We have to standardize this, and hold school leaders accountable." To combat systemic racism, she urged the use research-based curricula to reduce academic gaps along racial and ethnic lines while incorporating culturally-relevant teachings to keep kids engaged. "I hope that what you appreciate is that I live and breathe for public education," she said. "I'm excited to bring fresh thinking to the School Board and share my ideas with fellow members and district leadership." Nov. 2 is Election Day, with polls in Virginia open from 6 a. m. to 7 p. m. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Print (Opens in new window) Celtic House Irish Pub on Columbia Pike says it "does not wish to embroil itself" in the ongoing saga involving a local TikTok personality. The bar released a statement on… Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Print (Opens in new window) Mark your calendar for Sunday, Nov. 7. The annual PNC Parkway Classic, hosted by Pacers Running, is back. Run the streets of Old Town and enjoy views of the Potomac. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Print (Opens in new window) A now-former Arlington elections official is facing charges after police say she improperly removed someone from the voter roll. Tyra Baker turned herself in on August 26, according to Arlington… Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 9, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
news.yahoo.com
Article
2659 chars
news.yahoo.com
BingNews
Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine's first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, MORE→
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yesterday
Oct 16, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Politics and the City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in key seats
telegram.com
Article
5693 chars
Telegram & Gazette
Steven H. Foskett Jr., Telegram & Gazette
BingNews
Politics And The City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in important seats
and the City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in key seats Among several interesting discussions at Thursday's District 5 candidate forum was a query about how to improve typically dismal turnout at preliminary elections in the city. It was a somewhat loaded question, but moderator and at-large Councilor Gary Rosen certainly wasn't wrong, and the four candidates vying for two seats heading into the Sept. 14 preliminary election certainly had some ideas. Yenni Desroches said the city should consider moving to a ranked-choice system that weighs voter preference, and should push for the voting age in local elections to be lowered to 16. Young people are engaged about their future in this city, she said. Etel Haxhiaj said voters feel disconnected from City Hall and need to be shown that their vote matters. Other initiatives, like early voting and her own campaign's outreach to voters in different languages, make a difference. Gregory Stratman said reaching people where they're at - on social media - is important, and Stephen Quist called ranked-choice voting a "solution in search of a problem" and said lackluster print media coverage has contributed to a lack of interest in the preliminary races. In addition to the District 5 contest, Tuesday's preliminary election will feature a runoff for the three-way District 1 race. District 1 incumbent Councilor Sean Rose is vying for a third term; he's on the ballot with city police sergeant and union leader Richard Cipro and Burncoat Street resident David Shea. In both races, voters will be asked to pick two candidates to move on to the November election. Early voting, so popular in the national election last year, is now a fixture of local elections, and was going on all last week for the the two seats in which the number of candidates - more than double the available seats - triggered the runoff. But did voters take advantage for the typically sleepy preliminary contests? Not in droves for this one, to be sure. City Clerk Nikolin Vangjeli said that as of around 1 p.m. Friday, the last day of early voting for the two council districts, around 300 people cast in-person ballots throughout the week. He said 152 absentee ballots had been returned as of Friday, out of 291 requested, and said 39 early voting by mail ballots were requested but not yet returned. Non-citywide preliminaries are a tough sell for casual voters and are inserted into the election cycle at an odd time at the end of the summer, just after school reopens and before a lot of people start paying attention to any sort of politics. Turnout numbers for recent elections don't exactly forecast a late night for election workers on Tuesday. In 2019, citywide preliminary contests for at-large City Council and School Committee involved 28 candidates and still only mustered an 8.7% turnout, with 8,736 votes cast. In 2017, District 1 and District 5 were also on the preliminary election ballot, with a total of eight candidates. Around 4,900 voters cast ballots in the two districts, for a turnout of around 10%. In 2015, another citywide preliminary mustered only 11.18% of registered voters. Tuesday will be the third non-citywide preliminary election since 2001. The Sept. 11, 2001, preliminary asked voters to whittle down the District 2 slate; despite the terrorist attacks that day, voting that had already started was not suspended. But only 1,890 people voted. Newcomer Philip Palmieri gobbled up 40% of the vote that day and went on to enjoy a 14-year stay in the District 2 seat. Whatever happens with turnout Tuesday, it won't be because of some tired old excuse that it doesn't matter who gets in there. The candidates offer different solutions for different problems, and they all have different visions for how they see Worcester moving forward. Perhaps reflecting the times we're in, the City Council has become divided on many issues in recent years. Depending on the outcome, Tuesday's results could certainly reshuffle some existing alliances and majorities on the council in very different directions. After Tuesday, all politically focused eyes will be on the November election. The next big date to keep an eye on is Sept. 21, which is the last day for at-large council candidates to withdraw their names from the mayoral contest. In Worcester, all at-large City Council candidates are automatically entered into the mayor's race, unless they withdraw. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 11, 2021
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