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Arlington and ranked-choice voting - Your View - YourArlington.com
yourarlington.com
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1431 chars
> YourArlington.com - Your news, your views
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Community-news and opinion website whose aim is to inform and to involve the citizens of Arlington, Massachusetts, in reporting about their community.
John Ward, an Arlington resident, wrote this letter. The idea of ranked-choice voting detracts in several ways from our democratic system -- that the one with the most votes wins the election. As the number of registered voters who actually vote in town elections continues to decline, we now have people being elected by less than 25 percent of the registered voters. Using ranked choice would only exacerbate that number and put an individual in office with even less of a percentage. It allows an election committee to arbitrarily float votes from one candidate to another which is an abomination to our right to vote. A better solution would be to demand that an elected office be left vacant until they receive 51 percent of the actual number of registered voters. A runoff would be mandatory, and the consequence would force more people to vote or else eliminate the "elected" office until the public takes it seriously. The current status of elections is very tenuous and getting progressively worse. Fabricating vehicles to "create" a winner is just a very bad idea. This letter was published Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. MORE→
> 46 weeks
Nov 24, 2020

 
 
 
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Ranked Choice Voting Makes Its New York City Debut In Queens Special Election
wnyc.org
Article
478 chars
WNYC
The polls open for a special election in Queens Saturday. It's also the city's first election with ranked choice voting. 
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> 38 weeks
Jan 22, 2021

 
 
 
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Ballot measure to move Denver's municipal elections to April approved
coloradopolitics.com
Article
coloradopolitics.com
Edit
Newscatcher
> 6 weeks
Aug 31, 2021

 
 
 
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LETTER: Ranked-choice voting will revitalize Minnetonka elections - ECM Publishers
hometownsource.com
Article
84 chars
ECM Publishers
> 1 year
Aug 24, 2020

 
 
 
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Opponents Of Ranked-Choice Voting Fight To Delay A Change That Voters Approved
gothamist.com
Article
250 chars
Gothamist
Ranked-choice voting will be used beginning in 2021, and some City Councilmembers worry that voters, especially Black and brown New Yorkers, won't understand the process.
> 44 weeks
Dec 8, 2020

 
 
 
2.2%
Ranked choice voting: what is it
sitnews.us
Article
3926 chars
sitnews.us
Newscatcher
Ketchikan, Alaska news. Southeast Alaska news, Alaska news, national and world news.
Ranked choice voting: what is it, how does it work, and will it change Alaskan politics? October 11, 2021 Monday PM (SitNews) - Following its adoption by ballot initiative last year, Alaska’s future state and national elections will be held under Ranked Choice Voting, allowing voters to specify not just their favoured candidate but also their second, third and fourth choices. In the 2020 General Election, Alaska voters approved an initiative to establish a Nonpartisan Top Four Primary Election system and a Ranked Choice Voting General Election system. In the next general election on November 06, 2022, Ranked Choice Voting in Alaska will allow voters to rank their choices in order of preference. For a candidate to win, they must receive a majority (50% + 1) of total votes cast. If no candidate receives a majority of votes in the first round of counting, more rounds of counting continue until a candidate reaches a majority( More about Alaska's Rank Choice Voting ) This system is gaining ground across the United States and has been used for over a century in Australia, home of Political Scientist Professor Benjamin Reilly, University of Western Australia. Professor Reilly is visiting Juneau for his research and discussed recently during Evening at Egan Fall 2021, how Ranked Choice Voting works; its implications for voters, candidates and political parties; and what insights from comparative experience suggests for how the new system may impact Alaskan politics. November 08, 2022 Ranked Choice SAMPLE Voting Ballot https://www.elections.alaska.gov/doc/GenRCVSampleBallot6.pdf Alaska Division of Elections More About Rank Choice Voting https://www.elections.alaska.gov/RCV.php Register to Vote or Update Voter Registration Online Alaska Department of Elections Edited By Mary Kauffman, SitNews Source of News: Alaska Division of Elections www.elections.alaska.gov University of Alaska - Evening at Egan Fall 2021 Lectures uas.alaska.edu/eganlecture/ Representations of fact and opinions in comments posted are solely those of the individual posters and do not represent the opinions of Sitnews. Send a letter to the SitNews ©2021 Stories In The News Ketchikan, Alaska Articles & photographs that appear in SitNews are considered protected by copyright and may not be reprinted without written permission from and payment of any required fees to the proper freelance writers and subscription services. E-mail your news & photos to Photographers choosing to submit photographs for publication to SitNews are in doing so granting their permission for publication and for archiving. SitNews does not sell photographs. All requests for purchasing a photograph will be emailed to the photographer. MORE→
5 days
Oct 12, 2021

 
 
 
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This wouldn't happen with ranked choice voting - village14.com
village14.com
Article
64 chars
village14.com
> 1 year
Aug 14, 2020

 
 
 
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VIEWPOINT: Implement Ranked-Choice Voting Nationwide
thehoya.com
Article
54 chars
Georgetown University The Hoya
> 45 weeks
Dec 4, 2020

 
 
 
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Ranked Choice Voting Gaining Support From Left and Right
nwcitizen.com
Article
3692 chars
nwcitizen.com
Letters To The Editor
Newscatcher
Friday, August 6, was the monthly Art Walk in downtown Bellingham. Kit Muehlman and I were asking people to sign up as supporters of ranked-choice voting. We had a couple of little tables, a big banner saying "Ranked-Choice Voting for Washington," lots of handouts, and lots of clipboards with signup sheets. We were standing at the corner of Cornwall and Holly and the banner faced the phalanxes of cars as they swooped down Holly. (I was glad to see lots of bicyclists zooming down that long stretch of coordinated green lights, too. I have to confess that one of my main remaining ambitions is to get a speeding ticket on my bicycle. I figure I may be able to do that coming down Holly. . . .) But, back to the Art Walk. At first, things were a little slow. We had set ourselves up at 5:00, but we learned that people going on the Art Walk don't really come out in numbers until about 6:30. We had planned to stop at 7:00, but things were going so well by then that we decided to stay until 8:00. By then, the number of people walking past our little station really was decreasing – and it was getting cold – a typical Pacific Northwest summer evening. . . . By the end we had gathered the names of 39 new people who support ranked-choice voting. (Note: If ordinary people in the U. S. happen to want what the super-rich want, they usually get it, but public opinion by itself has – literally – no effect on what the people in Congress do. I can get you the study that shows this if you want to see it.) A trio of conservatives came by. They opined at first that ranked-choice voting was a "progressive plot." We were able to tell them that the Local Options Bill in Olympia now has bipartisan support. In deciding to co-sponsor the bill this year, Representative Jim Walsh (R) from Aberdeen said he wanted to "mix things up." His belief is that it will give access to minorities of all sorts – maybe even some unexpected minorities, like conservatives in deep blue districts. After hearing Jim Walsh and Republican co-sponsorship those conservatives were pretty interested. Jim Walsh recognizes that ranked-choice voting would mean that progressives in Eastern Washington finally get some representation, too. The Local Options Bill (HB 1156), by the way, would allow local jurisdictions in Washington state to adopt ranked-choice voting if they felt like it. Getting the Local Options Bill passed is the first step toward the general use of ranked-choice voting in all Washington elections. Kit and I even talked with a couple from Maine, who were enthusiastic supporters of ranked-choice voting. They couldn't put their names on our list of supporters, but it was fun to talk to people from the state that is leading the rest of the country in adopting this way of voting. Maine uses ranked-choice voting for all its state and federal elections – and has been doing so since 2018. Then there were all the people who didn't already know about ranked-choice voting but were willing either to listen to our brief pitch or to take one of the handouts that explain it. They usually didn't put their names on our list there and then. They needed a little time to digest the idea, and that's reasonable enough. Next time, they are likely to sign up. There are more and more people for whom the idea is familiar – and who want to see it come to be. Go to www. fairvotewa. org if you want to: Stoney Bird has been talking and writing about ranked-choice voting since the sessions of the Whatcom County Charter Review Commission in 2015. Stoney Bird has been car-free for the last 20 years. It's a good way to save money, stay healthy, and have fun when you are going around town. He served [...] MORE→
> 7 weeks
Aug 26, 2021

 
 
 
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CommonWealth Magazine
commonwealthmagazine.org
Article
23 chars
CommonWealth magazine
> 44 weeks
Dec 8, 2020

 
 
 
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Alaska is moving to ranked-choice voting, US, your state should too
businessinsider.com
Article
69 chars
Business Insider
> 45 weeks
Dec 5, 2020

 
 
 
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Voting-Reform Group Exec Apologizes for Calling Orthodox Jewish Community ‘Extremist Bloc’
hamodia.com
Article
5364 chars
Hamodia
An executive at a voter- and government-reform organization who referred to the Orthodox Jewish community in New York City as “an extremist bloc” due to its support for yeshiva independence, has apologized and said her comments were taken out of context, more than a week after doubling down on remarks for which she MORE→
NEW YORK - An executive at a voter- and government-reform organization who referred to the Orthodox Jewish community in New York City as “an extremist bloc” due to its support for yeshiva independence, has apologized and said her comments were taken out of context, more than a week after doubling down on remarks for which she received sharp criticism. “I apologize for causing anyone offense when words I used imprecisely were taken out of context,” Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause New York, said in a statement Tuesday, adding that she regrets her “ poor word choice distracting attention from the important issues New Yorkers face.” The controversy began after Lerner was quoted Feb. 19 in a Gothamist article about mayoral candidate Andrew Yang’s support in the Orthodox Jewish community due to his opposition to government control over yeshiva education. The Gothamist article noted that “the introduction of ranked-choice voting this year may play a complicating factor in the mechanics of the ultra-Orthodox bloc vote,” then quoted Lerner as saying, regarding ranked-choice voting, “One of its goals is to build a consensus majority, and you don’t do that by taking extreme positions. If you’re pandering to an extremist bloc, you’re perhaps not being strategic.” Assemblyman Simcha Eichenstein tweeted criticism of Lerner’s comments, writing, “Hey @CommonCause! How is it acceptable for the NY chapter Executive Director to refer to Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers as an ‘extremist bloc’??? You claim to be an organization that promotes ‘equal rights, opportunity, and representation for all.’” Other elected and communal officials piled on quickly, criticizing Lerner’s reference to the Orthodox community as “an extremist bloc,” and for implying that ranked-choice voting, for which she had advocated, was intended to reduce some groups’ influence. “We cannot accept labeling the Orthodox Community as ‘extremist,’” tweeted State Sen. Brian Benjamin. “Those running good government groups should know better than anyone not to traffic in stereotypes or stigmas.” Councilman Robert Holden tweeted, “Categorizing Orthodox Jewish voters as ‘extremist’ is unacceptable. Trying to marginalize religious New Yorkers is exactly the opposite of the inclusion and tolerance we need to move our city and our country forward.” And Councilman Joe Borelli tweeted, “This isn’t OK. Leaving aside the obvious antisemitism of calling a large groups of #NYC religious folks extremists, THE GOAL OF @CommonCause @commoncauseny AND RANKED CHOICE VOTING WAS TO LIMIT THE INFLUENCE OF CERTAIN VOTERS?” Lerner doubled down on her comments, tweeting on Feb. 21, “Happy to clarify: it is an extreme position to offer to flout the NYS substantial equivalency law to the benefit of voters who’ve made it a litmus test issue. Common Cause/NY has said that many times, and will insist on the meshugana position that politicians uphold the law.” The criticism continued, with some calling for Lerner to apologize or resign. Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday called Lerner’s comments “unacceptable” and a “really horrible characterization and unfair characterization.” On Tuesday, 11 days after the Gothamist article appeared and nine days after Eichenstein started the wave of criticism, Lerner apologized and said her remarks were taken out of context. “In public debate voters are best served when an argument is about how to solve problems, not labeling the people involved on either side,” Lerner said in a statement. “I apologize for causing anyone offense when words I used imprecisely were taken out of context, allowing Common Cause New York’s long-standing position on New York’s substantial equivalency law to be misconstrued. On the policy our position is unchanged; as a public figure I regret my poor word choice distracting attention from the important issues New Yorkers face in a political era begging for less heated rhetoric and more enlightened problem solving.” To which Eichenstein tweeted, “Better late than never. We welcome Susan Lerner’s apology and recognition that labeling an entire community is wrong. As a public figure, she should be engaging with all New York’s diverse communities, not demeaning them. Thank you for your apology.” The controversy comes as the yeshiva-education issue has taken on a prominent role in the 2021 mayoral campaign. The New York State Board of Regents is in the midst of formulating secular-studies guidelines (known as “substantial equivalency”) for private schools, which, in New York City, would be enforced by the schools chancellor, appointed by the mayor. MORE→
> 32 weeks
Mar 2, 2021

 
 
 
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Letter: Ranked-choice voting question should wait | Free - ECM Publishers
hometownsource.com
Article
75 chars
ECM Publishers
> 1 year
Aug 13, 2020

 
 
 
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Midlands Voices: Ranked choice voting would better serve the public - Omaha World-Herald
omaha.com
Article
90 chars
Omaha World-Herald
> 1 year
Aug 26, 2020

 
 
 
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Empowering The Voice Of The Middle
swiftcountymonitor.com
Article
Swift County Monitor
Reed Anfinson
Newscatcher
Our candidates are chosen through the primary election process. In the 10 elections conducted in the 21st Century in Minnesota, we have seen a low of 7.42% percent of voters cast ballots in a primary (2016) with a high of 22.77% showing up in 2018. However, the average has been 13.6%. Those who show up are the most dedicated and fervent of supporters. Some would say they are also the most uncompromising. Their stands are passionately, and rigidly, in place. It is these voters who chose our candidate for the general elections. They are the ones who will send elected officials to the Legislature in St. Paul or the halls of Congress in Washington, D.C. Candidates seeking election must first satisfy their base electorate. It is a purity test. Whoever most ardently holds tight to the views of their base will win the primary and make the general election ballot. We all know how bitter, divisive, and ugly the campaigns leading up to election day have become. The barrage of attack ads and sharp personal attacks in debates leave many voters disgusted with the process. Some eventually turn their backs on the election process and check out of participating in our representative democracy. The problem with this system is that it leaves many voters in the middle dissatisfied with their choices. They say they are left to decide between the lesser of two unsatisfactory candidates. There must be a better way to choose our candidates that leaves us with a broader choice, one that includes candidates in the middle, we are told. There is. It is called ranked-choice voting. It’s a process that proponents say ensures that the candidate with the broadest support wins. These same proponents also say that ranked-choice voting leads to more civil campaigns and debates. Candidates don’t want to become unlikeable to the voters in the middle whose ballots they may need. Ranked-choice voting isn’t without its problems. Opponents argue that it can be confusing to voters. They say its complexity causes some voters not to go to the polls. They say that in places where ballots are counted by hand, it creates a greater possibility for errors. And, it may still result in a candidate winning that doesn’t represent the majority of citizens. One other negative, opponents say, is that it is more expensive to have to count ballots multiple times to eventually find a winner if there isn’t a clear first choice in the first round. However, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and several other metro cities are already using ranked-choice balloting. It is used in towns in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Maryland. The State of Maine has used it since 2016. How does ranked voting work? On a regular election ballot, you will see the names of the candidates for each party listed separately. You vote for one choice on the ballot for each race. On a ranked-choice ballot, let’s say there are candidates for the Republican, Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) and Independence parties. What you are asked to do is rank those candidates by your preference. Let’s say the Republican candidate is your first choice, the Independent your second and the DFL candidate your third. You rank the Republican one and the Independent two. With the DFL candidate, you might not want to write in a number, and you are allowed to leave your third choice blank. (On the 2020 Minnesota presidential ballot there were nine parties represented.) With the ranked-choice voting process, a candidate must get more than 50% of the votes to be declared the winner. In our race, let’s say the Republican gets 42%, the DFL candidate 32%, and the Independence candidate 26%. Because no candidate received over 50% of the vote, the last-place candidate’s first-place votes are nullified. The election judges then make that voter’s number two candidate their first choice. That means the Independence Party’s 26% of the votes are broken down between the Republican and DFL candidates. The Republican candidate only needs 8.1% of the second choice votes of those who voted for the Independence Party candidate to win. However, if the DFL picks up 18.1% of the Independence Party votes, giving them 50.1% of the vote, that candidate is the winner. What that vote indicates is the DFL candidate was preferred by more voters overall than the Republican candidate. In some races, there may be more than three candidates, but the process is the same with the voters’ second-place candidate then distributed to the other candidates. One other benefit some see in ranked-choice voting is that it can erase the impact of “spoiler” candidates. These are candidates who could siphon off votes from a majority party candidate. A popular Green Party candidate would take votes away from a Democrat, while a popular Libertarian might take votes from a Republican. A voter can still vote for a favorite candidate. But now, rather than siphon off votes from the majority party candidate, their second-place votes will eventually be the ones counted toward a leading candidate. Again, this process requires the leading candidates to be attractive to a broad swath of voters, not just their base. This same ranked-choice process can be used in primaries. Supporters say ranked-choice voting it will reduce polarization in our politics and society. It is worth considering based on how disgusted many Americans are with the current system. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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I like Ike, but Mike’s OK; ranked-choice voting gets a look
therepublic.com
Article
6445 chars
The Republic
The Associated Press
An electoral reform that has taken root in the iconoclastic states of Maine and Alaska could be gaining traction nationwide
FALLS CHURCH, Va. — An electoral reform that has taken root in the iconoclastic states of Maine and Alaska could be gaining traction nationwide. Ranked-choice voting, a concept that was relegated to theoretical discussions among policy wonks for decades, is now being promoted by advocates in other states, building on last year’s successful initiative campaign in Alaska. A major push is under way in Wisconsin to enact similar reforms. New legislation in Virginia allows towns and cities to employ the concept beginning this year. Utah’s legislature passed similar legislation this month that awaits the governor’s signature. And in New York City , the Democratic mayoral primary to succeed term-limited Bill DeBlasio is using ranked-choice voting for the first time. Similar efforts could get a huge boost if the federal voting-rights legislation House Democrats approved survives Republican opposition in the Senate. It includes a provision requiring all voting equipment be able to accommodate ranked-choice voting, and mandates congressional study of the concept. Virginia Democratic Rep. Don Beyer has been pushing the idea for more than five years. He said one of the biggest obstacles is a lack of familiarity that leads people to believe it’s more complicated than it really is. “It passes the nod test,” Beyer said in an interview. “If you take two or three minutes to explain it, it makes sense, and you get that nod of recognition.” Fundamentally, ranked-choice voting works like this: Instead of voting for a single candidate, a voter ranks all of the candidates for a given office, from first to last. If one candidate gets a majority of the first choices, that candidate wins. If not, the last-place candidate is eliminated, and the votes that went to that candidate are now reallocated to the second choices of those voters. The process is repeated until a candidate has a majority. Maine voters approved ranked voting in federal races in a referendum in 2016, and it was used for the presidential election for the first time in 2020. Alaska voters took the concept a step further, approving a variant called Final Four balloting: The top four finishers in a non-partisan primary advance to a general election that will be determined by rank-choice voting. The reforms weaken the hold that voters on either end of the ideological spectrum have on the process, and could help moderate Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who’s up for re-election in 2022. In a closed primary, pro-Trump Republicans could knock her out for her vote to convict former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial. In a non-partisan primary, she can attract support from moderates in both parties to make the final four. While ranked-choice voting can be a boon to moderates and independents, it also is a lifeline to third-party candidates. Under the current system, voters are reluctant to cast ballots for a third-party candidate on the theory that their vote would be wasted. In a ranked-choice system, if your first choice finishes at the bottom, your second choice can still be counted. Opposition to ranked-choice voting reform has come primarily from the major political parties, said Jeremy Mayer, a political science professor at George Mason University who has studied the issue. “It weakens them as sources of power,” Mayer said. But in Virginia at least, Republicans appear to be on board with the concept for their own nomination process. State GOP officials have argued for months over how they will nominate a gubernatorial candidate this year, but one guiding principle has been an insistence on ranked-choice voting to ensure that, in a crowded field, a candidate won’t be declared a winner without majority support. Voters also are increasingly receptive. Mayer said the reforms promote civility because candidates won’t want to alienate voters who might be willing to make them their second choice. Opposition also comes from interest groups that can manipulate each parties’ primary process to their advantage, said Katherine Gehl, founder of the Institute for Political Innovation. Her group advocates for reforms similar to those enacted in Alaska, though it recommends a Final Five system over a Final Four. The primary benefit from ranked choice voting reforms isn’t necessarily a change in who gets elected, but rather the freedom it provides those who are elected to act beyond narrow political interests, Gehl said. “We are less concerned about who wins, but very focused on changing what winners have freedom to do and what they are incented to do,” Gehl said. Rob Richie, president and CEO of FairVote, which has been advocating for ranked-choice voting for nearly 30 years, said momentum for the concept is gaining, and voting systems are overcoming technological issues that had been a barrier in the past. “The logistics are getting easier,” he said. Beyer advocates the changes even in places where his own party stands to lose power as a result. He represents the city of Alexandria, where he’s been prodding officials to give ranked-choice voting a try in city council elections. The city council is now controlled entirely by Democrats, and ranked-choice voting could introduce a Republican or two. “If you’re a Republican in Alexandria, you’ve got to feel unrepresented,” he said. Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson said the concept is intriguing enough to study — after this year’s election cycle. MORE→
> 30 weeks
Mar 16, 2021

 
 
 
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Clearwater drops ranked choice voting referendum
news.yahoo.com
Article
2325 chars
news.yahoo.com
Newscatcher
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> 1 week
Oct 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Arkansas Issue 5, Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting Initiative (2020) - ballotpedia.org
ballotpedia.org
Article
85 chars
ballotpedia.org
> 1 year
Aug 24, 2020

 
 
 
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Opinion/Letter: Vote yes for ranked-choice voting
metrowestdailynews.com
Article
249 chars
The MetroWest Daily News
In fact, I was opposed to voter-driven initiatives, because I felt that our elected officials should be responsible for understanding and voting on issues that mattered to constituents. When the ...
> 50 weeks
Oct 29, 2020

 
 
 
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Column: Say yes to ranked-choice voting - MetroWest Daily News
metrowestdailynews.com
Article
64 chars
MetroWest Daily News
> 1 year
Aug 1, 2020

 
 
 
2.1%
Ranked Choice Voting Solves Problems in Texas
newsweek.com
Article
5026 chars
Newsweek
Newscatcher
Texas' 6th district has a new member of Congress. It's Jake Ellzey, who recently defeated Susan Wright in a competitive runoff election for the seat formerly held by Wright's late husband, Ronald. Many national observers followed this race as a test of Donald Trump's sway among GOP voters. Trump and the conservative Club For Growth endorsed Wright, while former Texas governor—and Trump energy secretary—Rick Perry backed Ellzey. Yet while intra-party intrigue always makes for irresistible headlines, what this contest really illustrates is how unrepresentative runoffs can be—and how we need a voter-friendly solution that creates better elections. The best answer would be ranked choice voting (RCV). It provides a much more accurate and representative outcome than an expensive, low-turnout runoff. Just look at what happened in Texas over a two-round runoff—and how many problems ranked choice voting would have helped solve. Instead of calling voters back to the polls a second time, everyone could have cast their ballot at once, with RCV working as an "instant runoff." Voter turnout in the decisive vote would have increased, strategic voting declined and the 6th congressional district would have had a representative far faster. Read more Wright and Ellzey led after May's first round in TX-06 and advanced to the runoff as the top-two finishers from a wild 23-candidate jungle primary featuring both Democrats and Republicans. Open seats naturally attract a lot of candidates. Voters should have lots of choices. But when voters have to negotiate a field that massive, a single choice isn't enough to capture the complexity of the situation. Indeed, that choice gets weaponized against them. All of those voters faced a difficult challenge. In a district that Trump only carried by 3 percentage points in 2020, Democrats hoped to push one candidate into the runoff, but with multiple candidates in the field, having additional choices meant dividing their votes among four of the top eight finishers—and ultimately being shut out of the final round. Republicans, with more candidates, had even more fear of casting a "spoiler" ballot. Ranked choice voting would have put an end to those fears and allowed everyone to cast a ballot that truly represented the richness of their perspectives. But it also would have allowed far more voters to have a say in the outcome. Nearly three months later, Ellzey turned that around in the runoff, earning just over 53 percent of the vote to edge Wright. But here's the shocking statistic: Fewer than 39, 000 voters took part in the runoff, a decline of more than 50 percent. That means an even tinier and less representative pool of voters made the final decision. That's a precipitous plummet, but one that's entirely predictable. Runoff elections are almost always low-turnout races, even though taxpayers spend tens of millions to administer them. Read more The political science on this is clear. FairVote studied every primary runoff for Congress between 1994 and 2020, and found that turnout fell in 97 percent of them. That's right. In 240 of 248 elections over 26 years, fewer voters cast ballots in the decisive runoff. The average decline was some 38 percent. In Texas' 99 congressional runoffs in this period, the average decline was even higher at 46 percent. The drop off is steepest in communities of color. States and localities nationwide have adopted ranked choice voting because it's such a useful tool in getting more voters to participate and to determine the winner who best combines wide and deep support. Democrats in New York City just used it to select the party's nominee for mayor. Republicans in Virginia used it this spring to select their nominee for governor and other statewide offices. In Utah, 23 cities chose to use RCV this November for their elections. Citizens in Maine and Alaska brought RCV to statewide races via the ballot initiative, with the Maine legislature adding presidential elections. It's not because it makes elections perfect. It simply makes them better. In New York's mayoral race, RCV came in for criticism because some 15 percent of voters did not back either of the final two choices among their top five rankings. Nitpickers called that an "exhausted ballot." But what's better, having five choices or merely one? Under the old system, any ballot not cast for the winner would have been "exhausted" right away. And as we see in Texas, the problem is not exhausted ballots but exhausted voters. Over half of those who took part in the first round didn't bother coming back for the second. Why not make it easier and conduct both rounds at once? We don't know how many voters in TX-06 would have ranked the final two candidates. But everyone who came out to vote the first time would have had the same opportunity to vote in the runoff. That's a better and more efficient election—and exactly the kind of nonpartisan election reform all voters, and all legislators, ought to get behind. Rob Richie is CEO of FairVote. MORE→
> 7 weeks
Aug 26, 2021

 
 
 
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Close to home, a vote can make the difference
santafenewmexican.com
Article
253 chars
The Santa Fe New Mexican
BingNews
The city uses ranked-choice voting, so in all races with more than two candidates, voters can rank their choices, top to bottom. A winner emerges when one candidate gets a majority of the votes. Santa Fe Public Schools has two property tax issues to ... MORE→
5 weeks
Sep 12, 2021

 
 
 
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Four dozen lawmakers endorse Question 2
wwlp.com
Article
237 chars
WWLP
Andres Vargas are cosponsors of a ranked-choice voting bill (H 719) that stalled out on Beacon Hill, triggering the ballot effort ... Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved.
> 1 year
Sep 22, 2020

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
news.yahoo.com
Article
2659 chars
news.yahoo.com
BingNews
Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine's first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, MORE→
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yesterday
Oct 16, 2021

 
 
 
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Rita Albrecht and ranked-choice voting - Herald Review
grandrapidsmn.com
Article
56 chars
Herald Review
> 1 year
Sep 30, 2020
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