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Close to home, a vote can make the difference
santafenewmexican.com
Article
253 chars
The Santa Fe New Mexican
BingNews
The city uses ranked-choice voting, so in all races with more than two candidates, voters can rank their choices, top to bottom. A winner emerges when one candidate gets a majority of the votes. Santa Fe Public Schools has two property tax issues to ... MORE→
5 weeks
Sep 12, 2021

 
 
 
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Maine may know some elections results sooner
youtube.com
Video
0:01:23
NEWS CENTER Maine
With ranked-choice voting in place, the waiting times for results could vary.
> 49 weeks
Nov 2, 2020

 
 
 
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Lawmakers Push to Delay Ranked-Choice Voting
ny1.com
Video
> 46 weeks
Nov 24, 2020

 
 
 
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Arkansas Issue 5, Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting Initiative (2020) - ballotpedia.org
ballotpedia.org
Article
85 chars
ballotpedia.org
> 1 year
Aug 24, 2020

 
 
 
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Lawmakers advance runoff election legislation
wyomingnews.com
Article
192 chars
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Nick Reynolds Wyofile.Com Via Wyoming News Exchange
BingNews
Wyoming lawmakers advanced a proposal Thursday to shift the state’s elections to a runoff system. Conservative activists favor runoffs as a way to avoid the type of vote-splitting they believe
> 5 weeks
Sep 11, 2021

 
 
 
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Here's how ranked-choice voting works
msn.com
Video
0:03:38
The Washington Post
Maine pioneered ranked-choice voting in its federal elections, and is currently the only state to use ranked-choice voting statewide. Here's a look at how ranked-choice voting works.
> 50 weeks
Oct 31, 2020

 
 
 
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AP source: Trump to endorse GOP challenger to Cheney
seattletimes.com
Article
140 chars
Seattle Times
BingNews
Former President Donald Trump has chosen a favored candidate in his bid to unseat Rep. Liz Cheney, one of his most vocal critics
Donald Trump
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Camden: Is ranked-choice voting worth it?
columbian.com
Article
4725 chars
The Columbian
Jim Camden
There’s a common refrain from voters throughout the ages when looking at their choices that there’s a long list of candidates, with one or two they really like but who don’t have a chance of winning.
Camden: Is ranked-choice voting worth it? By Jim Camden Published: February 24, 2021, 6:01am There’s a common refrain from voters throughout the ages when looking at their choices that there’s a long list of candidates, with one or two they really like but who don’t have a chance of winning. Or they look at a short list with no choices they like. If it’s the former, the theory goes, one of two things happens. They don’t vote because they’ve been told their candidate doesn’t have a chance. Or they vote for the candidate, who doesn’t win, and they’re unhappy with the eventual winner because they don’t feel their voice has been heard. If it’s the latter situation, another theory goes, they don’t vote and turnout goes down to the point where a majority of a minority elects someone to office. Or they make a “lesser of two evils” choice, and even if that person is elected, they’re unhappy as soon as he or she does something they don’t like. Some good government types, as well as a passel of legislators, think the solution to both of these situations is “ranked-choice voting.” Under that system, a voter can mark a ballot for more than one candidate in order of preference. So one could mark a Libertarian as No. 1, a Green Party candidate as No. 2, a Reform Party candidate as No. 3 and a member of a major party No. 4. Under a bill sent to the full state House of Representatives recently, a voter could choose up to five candidates in order of preference. If, when all the ballots are counted, no candidate has a majority, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and the ballots that had him or her as No. 1 are recalculated so that each of those votes are awarded to the candidate marked as a second choice. And so on. Eventually, they get to a point where someone has to have a majority, and is declared the winner. Supporters of ranked-choice voting, including Rep. Kirsten Harris-Talley, a Seattle Democrat who is the prime sponsor of a bill with the somewhat optimistic title of “Increasing representation and voter participation in local elections,” called it “an opportunity to nurture democracy” for cities, counties, school districts and other local jurisdictions. Spokane City Councilwoman Kate Burke also extolled the virtues of the system: “Ranked-choice voting is simply the logical extension of the same idea and system that we have now. It helps voters have their vote actually matter.” Lest anyone think this is solely the wishful thinking of deep blue progressives, Rep. Jim Walsh, an Aberdeen Republican with dark red bona fides, voted for the bill in committee. He had some concerns, but thought it might help all sorts of minority groupings of voters, even “conservative candidates in deep blue districts.” But after last year’s election, one has to wonder about the accuracy of those prognostications. Suppose, for example, the leading candidate in a five-way race had 40 percent of the vote at the end of the first round of voting and the second candidate had 35 percent. As the fifth-, fourth- and third-place candidates are eliminated, most of those second-, third- or fourth-choice votes go to the second-place candidate, who wins. Are voters any more likely to be happy? What about the candidate who was in first place at the end of what we generally think of as “the real” election? Is he or she likely to go quiet into that good night? This recalculating could mean the results aren’t known until Christmas. The bill leaves the decision to go to ranked-choice voting up to local jurisdictions. It wouldn’t be used for federal elections or state races. But it could set up a real headache for county elections officials if the city of Spokane opts for ranked-choice voting for its municipal offices but Spokane Public Schools doesn’t, and the city of Spokane Valley sticks with the current format while two of three Valley school districts decide to go ranked-choice. Under certain scenarios, ranked-choice voting could lead to more problems for elections officials and less confidence in its results. MORE→
> 33 weeks
Feb 24, 2021

 
 
 
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Politics and the City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in key seats
telegram.com
Article
5693 chars
Telegram & Gazette
Steven H. Foskett Jr., Telegram & Gazette
BingNews
Politics And The City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in important seats
and the City: Preliminary elections struggle to spark voter interest in key seats Among several interesting discussions at Thursday's District 5 candidate forum was a query about how to improve typically dismal turnout at preliminary elections in the city. It was a somewhat loaded question, but moderator and at-large Councilor Gary Rosen certainly wasn't wrong, and the four candidates vying for two seats heading into the Sept. 14 preliminary election certainly had some ideas. Yenni Desroches said the city should consider moving to a ranked-choice system that weighs voter preference, and should push for the voting age in local elections to be lowered to 16. Young people are engaged about their future in this city, she said. Etel Haxhiaj said voters feel disconnected from City Hall and need to be shown that their vote matters. Other initiatives, like early voting and her own campaign's outreach to voters in different languages, make a difference. Gregory Stratman said reaching people where they're at - on social media - is important, and Stephen Quist called ranked-choice voting a "solution in search of a problem" and said lackluster print media coverage has contributed to a lack of interest in the preliminary races. In addition to the District 5 contest, Tuesday's preliminary election will feature a runoff for the three-way District 1 race. District 1 incumbent Councilor Sean Rose is vying for a third term; he's on the ballot with city police sergeant and union leader Richard Cipro and Burncoat Street resident David Shea. In both races, voters will be asked to pick two candidates to move on to the November election. Early voting, so popular in the national election last year, is now a fixture of local elections, and was going on all last week for the the two seats in which the number of candidates - more than double the available seats - triggered the runoff. But did voters take advantage for the typically sleepy preliminary contests? Not in droves for this one, to be sure. City Clerk Nikolin Vangjeli said that as of around 1 p.m. Friday, the last day of early voting for the two council districts, around 300 people cast in-person ballots throughout the week. He said 152 absentee ballots had been returned as of Friday, out of 291 requested, and said 39 early voting by mail ballots were requested but not yet returned. Non-citywide preliminaries are a tough sell for casual voters and are inserted into the election cycle at an odd time at the end of the summer, just after school reopens and before a lot of people start paying attention to any sort of politics. Turnout numbers for recent elections don't exactly forecast a late night for election workers on Tuesday. In 2019, citywide preliminary contests for at-large City Council and School Committee involved 28 candidates and still only mustered an 8.7% turnout, with 8,736 votes cast. In 2017, District 1 and District 5 were also on the preliminary election ballot, with a total of eight candidates. Around 4,900 voters cast ballots in the two districts, for a turnout of around 10%. In 2015, another citywide preliminary mustered only 11.18% of registered voters. Tuesday will be the third non-citywide preliminary election since 2001. The Sept. 11, 2001, preliminary asked voters to whittle down the District 2 slate; despite the terrorist attacks that day, voting that had already started was not suspended. But only 1,890 people voted. Newcomer Philip Palmieri gobbled up 40% of the vote that day and went on to enjoy a 14-year stay in the District 2 seat. Whatever happens with turnout Tuesday, it won't be because of some tired old excuse that it doesn't matter who gets in there. The candidates offer different solutions for different problems, and they all have different visions for how they see Worcester moving forward. Perhaps reflecting the times we're in, the City Council has become divided on many issues in recent years. Depending on the outcome, Tuesday's results could certainly reshuffle some existing alliances and majorities on the council in very different directions. After Tuesday, all politically focused eyes will be on the November election. The next big date to keep an eye on is Sept. 21, which is the last day for at-large council candidates to withdraw their names from the mayoral contest. In Worcester, all at-large City Council candidates are automatically entered into the mayor's race, unless they withdraw. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 11, 2021

 
 
 
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How Monday's rerun of July primaries could affect the future of ranked-choice voting - Bangor Daily News
bangordailynews.com
Article
8654 chars
Bangor Daily News
Michael Shepherd
Monday’s retabulation scramble would have been a much bigger problem in a close election.
Good morning from Augusta. The Bangor Daily News is collecting information from readers on the political issues at the top of your minds in 2020. Take our survey here . QUOTE OF THE DAY: “What do we do if this sort of thing happens in a November Presidential election?” Jason Savage , the executive director of the Maine Republican Party, said in a Facebook post on Monday’s ranked-choice vote retabulation after the secretary of state’s office left out over 13,000 ballots from the July primaries. “Make the whole country wait for us to un-mess ourselves?” Here’s your soundtrack. What we’re watching today Monday’s retabulation scramble would have been a much bigger problem in a close election . The 13,000 ballots — left out in the initial ranked-choice count in July because Secretary of State Matt Dunlap ’s office selected the wrong file when uploading ballot images and one memory device caused an error preventing all ballot images from being uploaded — did not change any results this time, particularly because the Republican primary in Maine’s 2nd District was not close. But it showed how disruptive a potential error could be in a high-stakes election. The error was caught over the weekend before results were supposed to be certified by the governor, causing a last-minute scramble to check results. It resulted in a new count on Monday that Dunlap said was done publicly for the sake of transparency. Dunlap noted Monday that there have been issues with the system before. He said during the 2018 general election six towns incorrectly entered votes from overseas voters, though that error was caught before the ranked-choice tabulation was completed publicly. That incident affected 6,500 votes, half as many involved in Monday’s incident and would have been less likely to sway general elections, which have higher turnout than other elections. Though the effects were limited, the retabulation gives fuel to opponents of ranked-choice voting. Republicans attempted to collect signatures for a referendum on the state law allowing ranked-choice voting in presidential elections but Dunlap determined that they fell short . The state party is currently appealing in an attempt to reverse that decision. Separately, ranked-choice voting also faces a legal challenge from a group of voters who argue the system unfairly disenfranchises voters who do not rank a second or third choice. That case will be in court next week, where the plaintiffs will have to convince the judge, Lance E. Walker , that the merits of their case are different from a ranked-choice voting case he threw out in 2018. Ranked-choice voting has proven narrowly popular in Maine during referendums and in a 2018 exit poll by the Bangor Daily News . But Republicans’ main argument against it has been the added complexity it lends to our elections. People who share that view have another reason to believe that today. The Maine politics top 3 — “ Maine cities and towns could lose $146M in revenue by 2020’s end due to virus ,” Caitlin Andrews , Bangor Daily News: “[The projection] comes from a survey of 85 municipalities of varying sizes conducted from end of June to about mid-July, with results still coming in, lobbyist Kate Dufour of the association told Legislature’s budget committee on Monday.” The meeting did have some good news: the state’s major pension system closed the fiscal year earning just below its assumed return rate. That means lawmakers will not have to worry as much about the state’s contribution rates to the pension fund for teachers and state employees going up when they work on a budget for next year, although rates will not be set until later. — “ We checked if 285 Maine schools tested for cancer-causing radon. Only 1 did ,” Erin Rhoda , BDN: “There are higher average levels of the gas in Maine than the nation, and widespread testing 30 years ago showed that radon levels in some schools reached more than quintuple the rate considered safe.” — “ Unity College abruptly lays off staff ahead of plan to retool academic offerings ,” Abigail Curtis , BDN: “The changes are necessary for the school’s survival, Melik Khoury , president of Unity College, said. Although distance education has been growing at Unity, the number of students enrolled in the residential campus declined this year by about a third.” Developments in U.S. Senate race An independent U.S. Senate candidate is sticking around after saying last week he would drop out under certain conditions. Pro-Trump conservative Max Linn , who is running as an unenrolled candidate, said he would drop out of the race if Sen. Susan Collins , a Republican, adopted five of his preferred policy positions. Linn previously said that Collins’ allies had been pressuring him to quit the race. A former state senator challenged the Bar Harbor businessman’s signature collection last month but later withdrew the challenge . Joining Linn and Collins on the November ballot will be House Speaker Sara Gideon , a Democrat from Freeport, and Lisa Savage of Solon, a teacher and former Green Party candidate. An organization that once supported Collins is spending $1.7 million to oppose her. Planned Parenthood Votes, the political organization affiliated with the reproductive health care clinic, announced Tuesday morning that it would be investing in a broad voter contact program to help elect Gideon. It is another indicator of just how quickly times have changed for Collins, one of only a few Republicans who has expressed support for abortion rights. In 2017, the Maine senator received an award from Planned Parenthood in 2017 for her support of family planning programs. Today’s Daily Brief was written by Michael Shepherd, Caitlin Andrews and Jessica Piper. If you’re reading this on the BDN’s website or were forwarded it, email (we’re setting up a new subscriber page soon) to subscribe to it via email. To reach us, do not reply directly to this newsletter, but contact the political team at , or . MORE→
> 1 year
Aug 4, 2020

 
 
 
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Maine's 'Trump Before Trump' Launches a Comeback Bid
usnews.com
Article
135 chars
U.S. News & World Report
BingNews
Paul LePage, a pugnacious Republican, says he hopes to clean up his act. But will it get him back in the governor's mansion?
Paul LePage
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Four dozen lawmakers endorse Question 2
wwlp.com
Article
237 chars
WWLP
Andres Vargas are cosponsors of a ranked-choice voting bill (H 719) that stalled out on Beacon Hill, triggering the ballot effort ... Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved.
> 1 year
Sep 22, 2020

 
 
 
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If incarcerated people had been able to vote, the Attica killings may never have happened
nydailynews.com
Article
5254 chars
nydailynews.com
Soffiyah Elijah
BingNews
It’s a bright, bustling Saturday morning in the heart of Harlem on 116th St. and Lenox Ave, also known as Malcolm X Boulevard. People queue up for the food pantry giveaway outside the Mosque, while… MORE→
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> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Clear the Shelters, with Slime
wfla.com
Article
562 chars
WFLA
Wfla
BingNews
To adopt Slime, you can head to www.spcatampabay.org. For more information on Clear the Shelters, go to: www.wfla.com/cleartheshelters
Posted: Sep 13, 2021 / 09:56 AM EDT / Updated: Sep 13, 2021 / 09:56 AM EDT To adopt Slime, you can head to www.spcatampabay.org . For more information on Clear the Shelters, go to: www.wfla.com/cleartheshelters MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021

 
 
 
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Report: Trump to endorse GOP challenger to Cheney
whas11.com
Article
152 chars
WHAS11 News
BingNews
The endorsement marks Trump’s most significant to date as he works to maintain his status as GOP kingmaker and make good on his threat to exact revenge.
> 5 weeks
Sep 9, 2021

 
 
 
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Empowering The Voice Of The Middle
swiftcountymonitor.com
Article
Swift County Monitor
Reed Anfinson
Newscatcher
Our candidates are chosen through the primary election process. In the 10 elections conducted in the 21st Century in Minnesota, we have seen a low of 7.42% percent of voters cast ballots in a primary (2016) with a high of 22.77% showing up in 2018. However, the average has been 13.6%. Those who show up are the most dedicated and fervent of supporters. Some would say they are also the most uncompromising. Their stands are passionately, and rigidly, in place. It is these voters who chose our candidate for the general elections. They are the ones who will send elected officials to the Legislature in St. Paul or the halls of Congress in Washington, D.C. Candidates seeking election must first satisfy their base electorate. It is a purity test. Whoever most ardently holds tight to the views of their base will win the primary and make the general election ballot. We all know how bitter, divisive, and ugly the campaigns leading up to election day have become. The barrage of attack ads and sharp personal attacks in debates leave many voters disgusted with the process. Some eventually turn their backs on the election process and check out of participating in our representative democracy. The problem with this system is that it leaves many voters in the middle dissatisfied with their choices. They say they are left to decide between the lesser of two unsatisfactory candidates. There must be a better way to choose our candidates that leaves us with a broader choice, one that includes candidates in the middle, we are told. There is. It is called ranked-choice voting. It’s a process that proponents say ensures that the candidate with the broadest support wins. These same proponents also say that ranked-choice voting leads to more civil campaigns and debates. Candidates don’t want to become unlikeable to the voters in the middle whose ballots they may need. Ranked-choice voting isn’t without its problems. Opponents argue that it can be confusing to voters. They say its complexity causes some voters not to go to the polls. They say that in places where ballots are counted by hand, it creates a greater possibility for errors. And, it may still result in a candidate winning that doesn’t represent the majority of citizens. One other negative, opponents say, is that it is more expensive to have to count ballots multiple times to eventually find a winner if there isn’t a clear first choice in the first round. However, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and several other metro cities are already using ranked-choice balloting. It is used in towns in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Maryland. The State of Maine has used it since 2016. How does ranked voting work? On a regular election ballot, you will see the names of the candidates for each party listed separately. You vote for one choice on the ballot for each race. On a ranked-choice ballot, let’s say there are candidates for the Republican, Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) and Independence parties. What you are asked to do is rank those candidates by your preference. Let’s say the Republican candidate is your first choice, the Independent your second and the DFL candidate your third. You rank the Republican one and the Independent two. With the DFL candidate, you might not want to write in a number, and you are allowed to leave your third choice blank. (On the 2020 Minnesota presidential ballot there were nine parties represented.) With the ranked-choice voting process, a candidate must get more than 50% of the votes to be declared the winner. In our race, let’s say the Republican gets 42%, the DFL candidate 32%, and the Independence candidate 26%. Because no candidate received over 50% of the vote, the last-place candidate’s first-place votes are nullified. The election judges then make that voter’s number two candidate their first choice. That means the Independence Party’s 26% of the votes are broken down between the Republican and DFL candidates. The Republican candidate only needs 8.1% of the second choice votes of those who voted for the Independence Party candidate to win. However, if the DFL picks up 18.1% of the Independence Party votes, giving them 50.1% of the vote, that candidate is the winner. What that vote indicates is the DFL candidate was preferred by more voters overall than the Republican candidate. In some races, there may be more than three candidates, but the process is the same with the voters’ second-place candidate then distributed to the other candidates. One other benefit some see in ranked-choice voting is that it can erase the impact of “spoiler” candidates. These are candidates who could siphon off votes from a majority party candidate. A popular Green Party candidate would take votes away from a Democrat, while a popular Libertarian might take votes from a Republican. A voter can still vote for a favorite candidate. But now, rather than siphon off votes from the majority party candidate, their second-place votes will eventually be the ones counted toward a leading candidate. Again, this process requires the leading candidates to be attractive to a broad swath of voters, not just their base. This same ranked-choice process can be used in primaries. Supporters say ranked-choice voting it will reduce polarization in our politics and society. It is worth considering based on how disgusted many Americans are with the current system. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
bangordailynews.com
Article
1969 chars
Bangor Daily News
Michael Shepherd
ContextualWeb
Rep. Kyle Bailey is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system.
AUGUSTA, Maine — Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, said he was leaving the seat “due to an exciting professional opportunity that has arisen recently.” He easily won the 2020 race to succeed his husband, former Rep. Andrew McLean, D-Gorham, in a solidly Democratic district covering parts of Gorham and Scarborough. Similarly, McLean left his seat ahead of last year’s election to take a job after graduating from law school. Former state Sen. Jim Boyle, D-Gorham, who briefly ran for governor in the 2018 Democratic primary will run for the seat in a special election, the House Democratic campaign arm announced in a Friday statement. Party nominees for the seat must be picked at a local caucus after the secretary of state’s office announces the special election. The Legislature is not expected to return to Augusta in 2021, so Bailey’s resignation will have no short-term effect on House business. After he leaves, the chamber will have 79 Democrats, 65 Republicans, four independents and one Libertarian. Another open seat in Augusta will be filled after a November race between Democrat Raegan LaRochelle and Republican James Orr. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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Alaska is moving to ranked-choice voting, US, your state should too
businessinsider.com
Article
69 chars
Business Insider
> 45 weeks
Dec 5, 2020

 
 
 
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LETTER: Concern over ranked-choice voting and Minneapolis
hometownsource.com
Article
192 chars
hometownsource.com
David Paulson Minnetonka
ContextualWeb
To the Editor:
Copyright © 2021 at Sun Newspapers. Digital dissemination of this content without prior written consent is a violation of federal law and may be subject to legal action.
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Column: Say yes to ranked-choice voting - MetroWest Daily News
metrowestdailynews.com
Article
64 chars
MetroWest Daily News
> 1 year
Aug 1, 2020

 
 
 
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Maine high court clears way for ranked-choice voting in presidential contest
pressherald.com
Video
The court overturned a ruling that would have placed a "people's veto" referendum on the November ballot, thereby blocking the use of ranked-choice voting in the presidential contest.
> 1 year
Oct 1, 2020

 
 
 
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Easthampton to hold ranked-choice voting info sessions
gazettenet.com
Article
2536 chars
Daily Hampshire Gazette
Brian Steele
Newscatcher
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election.The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on... MORE→
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election. The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on Thursday, Oct. 21, at 11 a.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 6 p.m. Ray Spaulding, treasurer of the Friends of the Easthampton Council on Aging, said each of the masked indoor gatherings can accommodate 23 people plus the two presenters who will explain the voting process. Those who wish to attend must make a reservation by calling (413) 527-6151, ext. 0. The Nov. 2 election will be the first time in the city’s history that ranked-choice voting is used, following the approval of a ballot question in 2019. Voters will be asked to give each candidate a rank — 1, 2, 3, etc. — and winners are determined after multiple rounds of counting voters’ preferences. Ranked-choice is only used in races with one seat, such as the mayor’s race, and not for positions like City Council at-large in which multiple winners are declared. There are three candidates for mayor on the ballot – Eric Berzins, incumbent Nicole LaChapelle, and Keith Routhier — and a fourth, Donald Torrey, has launched a write-in campaign. Since there is only one City Council seat per ward, the winner will be chosen by ranked-choice voting, but because every incumbent is running for reelection unopposed, the rankings are unlikely to become a factor in determining the winners this year. “Really, ranked-choice voting doesn’t play into that race this year because there’s no competition for the seats,” Spaulding, an election worker for the past 10 years, said. Voters are not required to rank every candidate. “Whoever they want to vote for, if they don’t want to use ranked-choice voting, they put number one,” Spaulding said. All precincts will vote at Easthampton High School, 70 Williston Ave. Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters can request a mail-in ballot by downloading and submitting a form on the Secretary of State’s office or by calling the city clerk’s office at 413-529-1400, ext. 460. Brian Steele can be reached at bsteele@gazettenet.com. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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Green Party of California opposes the recall and endorses Green, Dan Kapelovitz
gp.org
Article
5374 chars
www.gp.org
BingNews
The Green Party of California OPPOSES the Gubernatorial Recall Election and endorses Green Party candidate Dan Kapelovitz for Governor after delegates from active county Green Parties participated in a vote following a six-week discussion period. Vote by September 14 on the Gubernatorial Recall Election: Ballot Question #1: VOTE NO ON RECALL Ballot Question #2: VOTE FOR Green Party's DAN KAPELOVITZ MORE→
SAN FRANCISCO - The Green Party of California OPPOSES the Gubernatorial Recall Election and endorses Green Party candidate Dan Kapelovitz for Governor after delegates from active county Green Parties participated in a vote following a six-week discussion period. Ballot Question #1: VOTE NO ON RECALL Ballot Question #2: VOTE FOR Green Party's DAN KAPELOVITZ Green Party of California https://www.cagreens.org Press Release September 8, 2021 SACRAMENTO, CA - The Green Party of California voted overwhelmingly both to vote no on the recall of Gov. Gavin Newsom and to endorse Green Party member Dan Kapelovitz as his replacement should the recall vote pass. Dan Kapelovitz is one of many former Bernie Sanders supporters who have joined the Green Party since 2016. He has a long record of grassroots activism, showing that for decades he has been aligned with the 10 Key Values of the Green Party. An attorney who also teaches law at the People’s College of Law in Los Angeles, his clients are mainly poor people caught up in the criminal justice system, as well as defenders of animal rights. More information about his campaign can be found online at https://kapelovitz.com . "I oppose this recall. Governor Newsom and the Democratic Party have recklessly endangered the residents of this state by strong-arming all arguably qualified Democrats into not taking part in the race to potentially replace him, thus leaving the field to far-right Republicans. Should this desperate gamble to persuade Californians to vote no on the recall fail, I am the progressive candidate most able to win, to govern effectively, and to pursue a strong reform agenda," said Dan Kapelovitz. "A vote for my Green candidacy can be a transformational vote for more choice and more voice for Californians, via ranked-choice voting and proportional representation elections. These critically needed reforms would lead to a viable multi-party system for California, giving more people in our state a seat at the table of our democracy." Greens oppose the recall because the lack of ranked-choice voting or a required runoff in this recall election creates the potential for a replacement to be elected by only a tiny minority of the voting public, and the candidates receiving the most attention are no better than Newsom and in many cases, far worse. "The vote to oppose the recall is by no means a statement of support for Newsom," said Laura Wells , official spokesperson for the Green Party of California, and a former candidate for Governor herself in 2010. "Newsom has had Democratic Party super-majorities in both houses of the legislature and still his actions and inactions have continually gone against Californians’ progressive values. During this pandemic, he has thwarted Californians’ ability to receive unemployment benefits and receive rent subsidies. He has failed to address the climate crisis, stop fracking, hold PG&E accountable for its continued disaster inducing incompetence, or require it to compensate victims in a timely and appropriate manner, and he has failed to raise billions to fight the climate crisis by imposing a severance tax on oil and gas extraction, as is standard in other states." "Despite having a budget surplus and despite the pandemic, Newsom and his supermajorities stunningly betrayed Californian voters by delaying consideration of a single-payer healthcare bill until sometime after 2021," said Wells. "He also vetoed a measure that would have enhanced democracy and broadened representation by allowing cities across California to use ranked-choice voting in local elections." Kapelovitz' choice to feature ranked-choice voting and proportional representation continues the Green Party's longstanding mission to restore accountability and authentic choice to California's electoral process. "We need these democracy enhancing reforms to end one-party rule, and give progressives a voice in Sacramento not chained to a party co-opted and corrupted by corporate donations and the 1%," said Greg Jan , coordinator of the Statewide Candidates Subcommittee. "A vote for Kapelovitz on September 14, and for Green candidates in next June's primary election, sends a strong message that Californians embrace progressive policies and electoral reform." The recall election ballots must be postmarked no later than election day, Tuesday, September 14, 2021. MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
news.yahoo.com
Article
2659 chars
news.yahoo.com
BingNews
Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine's first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, MORE→
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yesterday
Oct 16, 2021

 
 
 
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Five Reasons Why This is The Best Keto Bread Coconut Flour Recipe to Know
soundcloud.com
Podcast
SoundCloud
Violette W. Emory
https://youtu.be/Aqc7RKpEn10
https://eznatural.info/keto - Some of the best Keto recipes Here In this video you will know how to the best Keto Bread with Coconut Flour. This type of bread is great
if you are on a diet or keto diet and you need to replace your normal bread with a low carb bread alternative. There are several alternative bread recipe, which include ingredients such as almond flour, baking powder, or baking soda, but really the best of the keto bread recipes is the one which is made with coconot flour or coconut oil. The coconut flour bread is a gluten free keto bread recipe which contains egg whites, few net carbs, xoxo carine, psyllium husk which makes this one of the best breads to include in a low carb keto recipes. Tags: #ketobread #coconutflourbread #ketobreadrecipe #keto #ketorecipes #lowcarbbread #coconutflour #howtomakeketobread #ketobreadalmondflour #ketobreadcoconutflour #ketorecipe #ketococonutbread #ketodiet Other Keywords: keto bread,coconut flour bread,keto bread recipe,keto,keto recipes,low carb bread,coconut flour,how to make keto bread,keto bread almond flour,keto bread coconut flour,keto recipe,keto coconut bread,keto diet,easy keto bread,low carb bread recipe,bread,low carb coconut flour bread,coconut bread,best keto bread,keto bread coconut flour recipe,keto coconut flour bread,keto bread loaf,keto meal prep This Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aqc7RKpEn10 Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkq5POt8PPe30uOG2UCtjhw All Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkq5POt8PPe30uOG2UCtjhw/videos MORE→
> 1 year
Apr 24, 2019
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