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AP source: Trump to endorse GOP challenger to Cheney
seattletimes.com
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140 chars
Seattle Times
BingNews
Former President Donald Trump has chosen a favored candidate in his bid to unseat Rep. Liz Cheney, one of his most vocal critics
Donald Trump
> 5 weeks
Sep 8, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
What to know to vote in the 2021 local Doña Ana County elections
lcsun-news.com
Article
5179 chars
Las Cruces Sun-News
Michael Mcdevitt
BingNews
Early and absentee voting in Doña Ana County is back for the 2021 local elections. Here's what you need to know to participate.
What to know to vote in the 2021 local Doña Ana County elections Michael McDevitt LAS CRUCES - Early and absentee voting in Doña Ana County is back for the 2021 local elections. Here's what you need to know to participate. First, if you're planning on voting for one of the many races for a local city council, school board, mayor or soil and water conservation board, you should check to make sure you're registered to vote. The regular deadline for online , mail, Motor Vehicle Division and third-party registration is Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. From Oct. 5 to Oct. 30, same day registration will be available in person at the county's nine early voting locations just prior to voting. Visit the online registration page here. Even if you voted in the 2020 general election, it's always best to check to make sure you're still registered to vote before an upcoming election, Chief Deputy County Clerk Lindsey Bachman said. If you moved since last fall, for instance, your registration may need to be updated. You can check your registration status here. Once you're registered, you can vote early, vote absentee or vote on Election Day, Nov. 2. The Doña Ana County Government Center, located at 845 Motel Boulevard in Las Cruces, will serve as an early voting location from Oct. 5 through Oct. 29 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Oct. 30 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The center will be closed for Indigenous Peoples' Day on Oct. 11. Here's a list of the county's alternate early voting locations. These locations will be open to voters from Oct. 16 to Oct. 30, Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Anthony City Hall Municipal Complex, 820 Highway 478, Anthony, NM. Doña Ana Community College-Sunland Park Center, 3365 McNutt Road, Sunland Park Delores C. Wright Educational Center, 400 East Lisa Drive, Chaparral Corbett Center Student Union, New Mexico State University, 1600 International Mall, Las Cruces Hatch High School, 170 East Herrera Road, Hatch Las Cruces City Hall, 700 North Main Street, Las Cruces, Mesilla Town Hall, 2231 Avenida de Mesilla, Mesilla Sonoma Elementary School, 4201 Northrise Drive, Las Cruces How to get an absentee ballot in Doña Ana County Applications for absentee ballots are available online at the New Mexico Secretary of State's website , for online submission or to be printed and filled out, or are available by contacting your local county clerk's office. Printed applications should be mailed or delivered to the county clerk's office at the county government center. Voters have until Oct. 28 at 5 p.m. to request one. People can vote absentee without an excuse in New Mexico. Absentee ballots will begin to be mailed to voters Oct. 5. Voters have until 7 p.m. on Election Day to return the ballots by mail or in-person to a polling place or the county clerk’s office. It's recommended that voters mail their absentee ballots by Oct. 26 so it's delivered on time. After that date, it's recommended to hand-deliver it. Election Day is Nov. 2. See a list of who's running and what positions are up for election here. This election will be the second in which the City of Las Cruces uses ranked choice voting, in which voters are able to rank candidates in order of preference. Only the city council race for District 5 will be a ranked choice race, since it's the only municipal race with more than two candidates. You can find information about registration, absentee ballots and important deadlines at dacelections.com or nmvote.org . Michael McDevitt is a city and county government reporter for the Sun-News. He can be reached at 575-202-3205, or @MikeMcDTweets on Twitter. Others are reading: MORE→
> 5 weeks
Sep 7, 2021

 
 
 
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A win for democracy in Yakima County
seattletimes.com
Article
142 chars
Seattle Times
BingNews
A change to how county commissioners are elected will empower Yakima's Latino community and rightfully offer true representation.
Yakima County
> 5 weeks
Sep 7, 2021

 
 
 
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Bill changing absentee ballot counting rules gets committee nod
jhnewsandguide.com
Article
341 chars
Jackson Hole News&Guide
Hannah Black Wyoming Tribune Eagle Via Wyoming News Exchange
BingNews
CHEYENNE — At least one bill related to elections will be introduced by committee during Wyoming’s 2022 legislative session, while the fate of two other proposed bills is murky.
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> 5 weeks
Sep 6, 2021

 
 
 
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Lenhart: Runoff voting is the wrong choice for Wyoming
wyomingnews.com
Article
176 chars
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
BingNews
Voting laws have been in the news for much of the past year. Beginning after the November election, several states made changes to their voting laws with the stated goal
Wyoming
6 weeks
Sep 5, 2021

 
 
 
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Get ready: Election Day is fast approaching
abqjournal.com
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Albuquerque Journal
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6 weeks
Sep 5, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
City of Santa Fe - Ranked Choice Voting: Olivia Owl
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6 weeks
Sep 5, 2021

 
 
 
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Who likes swag? Help spread the word about ranked choice voting by wearing it! Visit the shop through our menu items at the top of the group!
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113 members in the RankTheVoteNebraska community. A place to discuss Ranked Choice Voting and how it can be implemented here in the Cornhusker …
> 6 weeks
Sep 4, 2021

 
 
 
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Opinion: Latino voting lawsuit is a win for the whole county
yakimaherald.com
Article
254 chars
Yakima Herald-Republic
Yakima Herald-Republic
BingNews
The 2022 election season just got a lot more interesting.
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> 6 weeks
Sep 3, 2021

 
 
 
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Interim committee advances draft bill to extend absentee ballot processing time
wyomingnews.com
Article
210 chars
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Hannah Black Wyoming Tribune Eagle
BingNews
CHEYENNE – At least one bill related to elections will be introduced by committee during Wyoming’s 2022 legislative session, while the fate of two other proposed bills is murky.
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> 6 weeks
Sep 3, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Commentary: Coming Around to Choice Voting…
davisvanguard.org
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6491 chars
The People’s Vanguard of Davis
Editorial Board
Newscatcher
Davis, CA – I was wrong. I thought that District Elections would facilitate more people of color running and competing in Davis. At least in round one in the city council that did not happen. I know there are some who are kind of holding out hope that perhaps it could be undone by the courts, but more likely than not, I think that will not be the case. Not only was I wrong about the racial composition of the candidates, but as it turned out, I just didn't like the winner-take-all system. The biggest problem – at least for me – isn't dividing the city up – I actually don't mind that part, it's that we have created a bunch of single-member, winner takes all districts. So while it used to be that the top two or three vote-getters would get seated, now it is one person winning in each district, which means you basically vote for the lesser of the evils rather than some of the more interesting minor candidates. I think there might be a solution to that however – choice voting. I have generally been opposed to the idea. I want to vote for my candidate and have the numbers tabulated. I also feared that it would be confusing to the voters. But the last few years I have watched it in action in San Francisco and New York, and there really weren't a lot of problems. (New York had some snafus in their tabulation, but most objective observers concluded that was incompetence by the election officials – not choice voting itself). Some critics complained as Michael Saltsman and Rebekah Paxton did in the Wall Street Journal: "New York City voters went to the polls on June 22, but a week and a half later the winner of the Democratic mayoral primary remains unclear. That's a big loss for the city's new system of ranked-choice voting." But elections sometimes take some time to tabulate – especially if they are close, especially if you are tabulating different methods of vote casting, I don't see the urgency to know immediately who wins. In the New York Mayor's race, the problem, as it turned out, nothing really changed with rank-choice voting. I have heard and in fact, argued that it is a complicated process – but it is really not. I think I was wrong about that as well. Look if they can figure out choice voting in places like Berkeley, Cambridge, Minneapolis, Oakland, San Francisco, San Leandro – why can't it work in Davis. In 2019, New York voters approved a plan to implement ranked-choice voting for local primary and special elections. The way it works, if a candidate gets 50 percent of the vote, they win automatically on the first ballot. If not, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and the votes are then distributed to the second choice. The process continues until a candidate gets to 50 percent. As Katrina vanden Heuvel wrote in the Washington Post in May, "The first-past-the-post system used in most U. S. elections causes significant problems: To avoid wasting their votes, voters are incentivized to choose the candidates they deem likely to win, not just the candidates who most closely align with their values." As John Nichols puts it, ranked-choice voting means voters "no longer have to be pundits, fretting about who is up or down in the polls." Vanden Heuvel believes, "Ranked-choice voting also significantly reduces candidates' incentives to go negative against their opponents. Under the system, candidates need to focus on being one of the choices voters rank, rather than the only choice, which encourages less mudslinging and more affirmative case-making for each candidate." Harvard political scientist Harvey Mansfield – well respected but very conservative) argued in the Wall Street journal: "Ranked-choice voting makes the common good inferior to each person's private first choice. The common good of the country typically gets ranked second choice or below for each citizen." But I don't really understand that argument. Often I vote for my second or third choice anyway because I know the best choice cannot possibly win. This way, I can vote for my first choice knowing that my compromise choice will eventually be counted. The filmmaker and critic Noah Millman likewise argues that "The capriciousness of ranked choice voting is revealed in NYC." He writes: "[T]he mere fact that a clear Adams plurality on Election Day is going to end as a squeaker should raise eyebrows." I guess it depends how you look at it. In the first round, Adams led with 30. 7 percent to WIley with 21. 4 and Garcia with 19. 6 percent. By round 7 – it was 405 to 30. 5 for Garcia and 29. 1 for Wiley. And it ended up, 504-49. 6 with Adams winning over Garcia. There are two ways to look at that – one way is certainly the way that Millman did. That he had an 88, 000 vote lead on Election Day over the second place finisher. Or you could look at it another way – yes he had a large plurality lead, but less than one-third of the voters had him as their first choice. We are conditioned to accept scenario 1, but maybe that's our problem. What actually happened is that the progressive split their vote and once that vote split was removed after Round 7, the true result was that Adams hung on to win. The current system encourages strategic vote and discourages multiple candidates who have similar views. Meanwhile I think it fixes the problem that District Elections introduces. I no longer have to vote for the best candidate that I personally think has a chance (and sometimes I have been wrong about who has a chance). I like it because it would have allowed me to vote for a young candidate with good ideas like Kelsey Fortune or Connor Gorman without fearing that they have no chance to win because my third choice could be one of the main candidates. In fact, the South Davis race was particularly difficult for me because I actually liked all four candidates and had to pick just one. Ranked choice voting then solves most of my problems that I have with district elections. Strangely in Davis, there seems to be an almost knee jerk reaction to things that present big changes. That's too bad. It leads us to accept a system that doesn't work particularly well in fear of implementing another system that introduces unknowns. David Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children. MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 3, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Changes to Wyoming's primary election system unlikely before 2024
trib.com
Article
1919 chars
Casper Star-Tribune Online
Victoria Eavis
BingNews
Wyoming's far right has pushed for runoffs, but it appears any change won't happen in time for next year's races involving Rep. Liz Cheney and Gov. Mark Gordon.
The ranked-choice bill failed Thursday in an 8-4 vote and the jungle primary bill was tabled, but committee support for a jungle primary did not appear to be robust. Committee-sponsored bills historically have a better chance of success when the full Legislature gathers. Still, an individual lawmaker could bring an election reform bill to the session. Case, the most vocal advocate for ranked-choice voting, believes that it’s superior to a jungle primary or a runoff. “This is the wave of the future, and this is a good one,” he said. Support Local Journalism Your membership makes our reporting possible. {{featured_button_text}} The third option came from Rep. Chip Neiman, R-Hulett, who is not a member of the committee. He brought a bill — and a necessary constitutional amendment to go along with it — that would implement a runoff election for the 2024 election, in the hopes of getting the committee to sponsor it. The committee voted to discuss the bill and the amendment at its next meeting, which will occur before the full session. Under Neiman's bill, the primary would be in May and the runoff election would occur in August if no candidate received more than 50% of the votes. If a runoff is triggered, voters will not be able to switch parties between the two elections. MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 3, 2021

 
 
 
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Bill changing absentee ballot counting rules gets committee nod
wyomingnews.com
Article
197 chars
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Hannah Black Wyoming Tribune Eagle Via Wyoming News Exchange
BingNews
CHEYENNE — At least one bill related to elections will be introduced by committee during Wyoming’s 2022 legislative session, while the fate of two other proposed bills is murky.
Conference committee
> 6 weeks
Sep 3, 2021

 
 
 
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Local municipalities are banking on ranked-choice voting
cachevalleydaily.com
Article
3738 chars
Cache Valley Daily
Newscatcher
CACHE COUNTY – In November, 23 towns and cities in Utah will use ranked-choice voting to conduct their municipal elections. That group includes the cities of Nibley and River Heights as well as the town of Newton here in Cache Valley. In 2018, the Utah Legislature approved a pilot program to allow cities, towns and counties to conduct local elections using ranked-choice voting. Until now, only Utah County and the small municipalities of Payson and Vineyard had taken advantage of that option. Now, with Salt Lake City leading the way, nearly two dozen Utah municipalities have opted for ranked-choice voting in the upcoming general election. The immediate impact of that decision was to allow those towns and cities to avoid the administrative burden and expense of conducting primary balloting on Aug. 10. In fact, the official deadline for candidate registrations in Newton, Nibley and River Heights was deferred until Aug. 17. Advocates of ranked-choice voting argue that option is the most efficient and accurate way to understand the voice of the people. That voting procedure not only saves jurisdictions money by preventing costly run-off elections, they say, but also reduces negative campaigning. Moreover, ranked-choice voting is reputed to guarantee that the majority of voters will at least approve of the winner in a crowded field of candidates. "Crowded" is certainly the best description of the fields of candidates in Newton, Nibley and River Heights. In Newton, only two candidates have filed for the post of mayor. They are incumbent Mayor Kevin Rhodes and challenger Mike Benson. In the race for two city council seats, however, incumbent Gordon A. Anderson is in the running along with newcomers Brett Peterson, Jake Christiansen and Reese Bartell Jenkins. In Nibley, Mayor Shawn Dustin has chosen not to seek reelection and four hopefuls are now vying for that post. They are Larry Jacobsen, Craig J. Peterson, Matt Logan and city council member Nathan Laursen. In the race for two seats on the Nibley City Council, incumbent Kathryn Beus is competing with Cody Christensen, Tom Davis, Norman Larsen and Norman R. Hill. While Jason E. Thompson is running unopposed to replace Todd Rasmussen as mayor of River Heights, the race for two city council seats there is definitely crowded. Incumbent city council member Nancy Huntly is seeking reelection while newcomers David Wayne Bush, Janet Humphrey Mathews, Jerry L. Pence, Tyson Glover and Lance B. Pitcher are also in the running. Rather than choosing a single candidate on their ballots in November, the voters in Newton, Nibley and River Heights will instead rank all candidates by preference as their first, second and third choices and so on. When city officials begin counting ballots, they will tally the number of first-preference votes. If no candidate receives more then 50 percent of first-preference votes, the count continues to a second round. The second and any subsequent rounds of ranked-choice vote counting functions as an instant run-off election. In round two, the candidate with the fewest first-preference votes is eliminated and his or her second-preference votes are then distributed to the remaining candidates. That process continues until one candidate secures more than 50 percent of the vote. Many Utah election officials are still leery of ranked-choice voting, however, suggesting that it may confuse voters and require the acquisition of new technology. But advocates of that practice insist that more widespread use of ranked-choice voting in the upcoming municipal election may serve to allay those fears. Would you like to have the day's news stories delivered right to your inbox every evening? Enter your email below to start! MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 2, 2021

 
 
 
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Latinos rally behind settlement that forces new Yakima County Commission districts in 2022 election
yakimaherald.com
Article
358 chars
Yakima Herald-Republic
Phil Ferolito Yakima Herald-Republic
BingNews
Latinos soon will reach an unseen level of political representation here thanks to a settlement reached with Yakima County over alleged violations of the Voting Rights Act, said former Yakima
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> 6 weeks
Sep 2, 2021

 
 
 
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Latinos in Yakima will reach unseen political representation in 2022 as settlement remakes districts
yakimaherald.com
Article
358 chars
Yakima Herald-Republic
Phil Ferolito Yakima Herald-Republic
BingNews
Latinos soon will reach an unseen level of political representation here thanks to a settlement reached with Yakima County over alleged violations of the Voting Rights Act, said former Yakima
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> 6 weeks
Sep 2, 2021

 
 
 
4.5%
Elders push back as Wyoming GOP leaders imply ranked choice voting too hard for them to understand
oilcity.news
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6751 chars
Oil City News
Opinion
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However, citizens who described themselves as elderly told the Joint Interim Corporations, Elections & Political Subdivisions Committee that they have no trouble understanding how ranked choice voting works. "I'm not confused about ranked choice voting," Johnson County resident Frank Pratt said, saying that he could be considered a member of the "elderly class." He also pushed back against the notion that voters are incapable of researching multiple candidates in order to meaningfully rank them in order starting with their favorite candidate. Sheriden resident Jackie McMann said she could also be considered elderly and that she has no trouble understanding ranked choice voting. "Ranked choice voting is essentially a computerized caucus," McMann said. Both a caucus and ranked choice voting allow people to vote first for their favorite candidate without wasting their vote because that candidate isn't viable. If their favorite candidate doesn't get a high enough percentage of the vote, voters get to have their vote count toward their second favorite candidate. If their second favorite candidate also doesn't get a high enough percentage of the vote, voters get to have their vote count toward their third favorite candidate, etc. McMann noted that people don't have to vote for more than one person in a ranked choice system. They could simply identify their favorite candidate and not indicate who their second, third, fourth or fifth favorite candidate is. She said ranked choice voting would be an improvement over the current "binary" system in which people's votes are all or nothing, for one particular candidate and effectively against all other candidates. McMann acknowledged that the ranked choice system may be more complex than the current system but said that people are living in a "complex society with complex issues" that needs something better than a binary, either-or system in order to function in a robust manner. Wyoming GOP Chair Frank Eathorne, without citing any numbers, said that the "grassroots" among Wyoming Republicans are opposed to ranked choice voting. He said that "grassroots" Republicans instead prefer a concept like runoff primary elections as they want to see a candidate win a majority of the vote in order to win a seat at the levers of power. Carbon County Republican Party Chair Joey Correnti told the committee that he thought members should be cautious about people making claims about the opinions of the over 130, 000 Republicans in Wyoming, especially when they don't cite specific numbers. Correnti said that he is opposed to ranked choice voting as he thinks it "raises more questions than it provides solutions." He said that instead of working to reform primary elections in Wyoming, the legislature should consider whether the state should have any role in primary elections to begin with. He noted that the Republican Party and the Democrat Party are not branches of government and that both should perhaps be responsible for determining their own primary election processes to determine candidates for the general election. Wyoming GOP Vice Chair Dave Holland said that ranked choice voting might be too complicated and that the legislature shouldn't rush to implement it ahead of the 2022 election. Committee Vice Chair Rep. Dan Zwonitzer (Laramie County) said that he thought that the reason the committee was considering the bill at all was because the Wyoming GOP was pushing for changes to how primary elections are conducted in Wyoming by 2022. Holland said that while the party wants change, the push is for runoff primary elections. He said that in his conversations with county clerks, it has become apparent to him that this will not be doable in time for the 2022 General Election. Speaking for himself rather than on behalf of the party, Holland said he'd prefer the legislature take its time and get something like a runoff election system right rather than rushing to get something in time for the 2022 election cycle. "Don't pass something that doesn't work just to meet a deadline," Holland said. Sen. Cale Case (Fremont County) said he thought it might be best for the legislature to leave the election structure alone until the 2022 election cycle is over. However, Case made a motion that the committee pass the draft ranked choice voting bill and approve it for introduction during the full legislature's 2022 session. He noted that he had concerns the concept could be implemented in time for 2022. A representative from the Secretary of State's office told the committee implementing the concept would come with costs and would also require time to change voting systems and ensure they are properly able to handle ranked choice voting, a task which she said is not likely to be feasible in time for the 2022 election cycle. Case said that while there are obvious challenges to implementing ranked choice voting, he thinks it is the "most implementable" option for reforming Wyoming's election structure on the table. He added that he thinks ranked choice voting has advantages over both runoff elections and so-called "jungle" primaries. "This is the wave of the future and it is a good one," Case said, suggesting the committee at the very least keep the draft legislation alive for further debate. Sen. Brian Boner (Converse, Platte) offered an amendment to the draft legislation to make ranked choice voting an option at the municipal level and Zwonitzer amended this amendment to make ranked choice voting an option for special districts as well. Boner argued that trying out ranked choice voting at the municipal level prior to using it in statewide elections could help the state identify problems and improve the structure before tweaking statewide elections. Sen. Charles Scott (Natrona) expressed opposition to the bill, though he said ranked choice voting is "an intriguing idea." Scott said that while he thinks it may have applications among small groups, used for more broard elections could be too confusing to people. MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 2, 2021

 
 
 
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County Leaders Happy No Ranked Voting Coming to Yakima
newstalk870.am
Article
1097 chars
newstalk870.am
Newscatcher
Ranked-Choice Voting isn't coming to Yakima County anytime soon. That's according to a news release from the Yakima County Commissioners. In July of this year the group OneAmerica and four other people filed a lawsuit saying the county election system is unfair to Latino voters. The group who filed the lawsuit in Kittitas County Superior Court maintained the system was a violation of the state's Voting Rights Act. Ranked-choice voting is a electoral system in which voters by preference can rank political candidates on a ballot. According to the website Ballotpedia "If a candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, he or she is declared the winner. If no candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, the candidate with the fewest first-preference votes is eliminated. First-preference votes cast for the failed candidate are eliminated, lifting the second-preference choices indicated on those ballots. A new tally is conducted to determine whether any candidate has won a majority of the adjusted votes. The process is repeated until a candidate wins an outright majority." MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 2, 2021

 
 
 
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Yakima County, Seattle-based OneAmerica settle lawsuit alleging disenfranchisement of Latino voters
seattletimes.com
Article
242 chars
Seattle Times
BingNews
Yakima County commissioners have agreed to settle a lawsuit alleging violations of the Voting Rights Act, Seattle-based OneAmerica announced Tuesday. The lawsuit claims Yakima County's voting system disenfranchises Latino voters. MORE→
Yakima County
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
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Yakima County agrees to settlement in lawsuit alleging Voting Rights Act violations
wenatcheeworld.com
Article
172 chars
The Wenatchee World
Phil Ferolito Yakima Herald-Republic
BingNews
YAKIMA — Yakima County Commissioners have agreed to settle a lawsuit alleging violations of the Voting Rights Act, an immigrant rights group announced Tuesday.
Yakima County
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Ranked Choice Voting Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis Park, Bloomington and Minnetonka
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0:02:48
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Xogmaal Media
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Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis Park, Bloomington and Minnetonka
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
1.1%
Ranked-choice voting, explained
mprnews.org
Article
3696 chars
MPR News
Grace Birnstengel
BingNews
Ranked choice voting is used in Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis Park, Bloomington and Minnetonka elections. It’s complicated, but not that complicated. Here’s a refresher on the process.
This fall marks the fourth time Minneapolis will use ranked choice voting — also known as instant-runoff voting — to elect a mayor of the city. Voters approved of the process in 2006, making the change from traditional voting and kicking off ranked-choice in 2009. Voters also rank candidates for City Council, the Park and Recreation Board and the Board of Estimate and Taxation. St. Paul abides by ranked-choice voting, too, as well as St. Louis Park, and newly in 2021: Minnetonka and Bloomington. It’s complicated, but not that complicated. Here’s a refresher on the process: How does ranked choice voting work? Ranked choice is a system that allows voters to choose up to three candidates and rank them by preference: first choice, second choice and third choice. The idea is that if your top choice loses the race by a long shot, your vote can still count toward your second choice, who may be more of a competitive candidate. Regardless, your first-choice vote will be considered before any other candidates you ranked. How are ranked choice votes counted? Under ranked choice voting rules, it’s not enough to just get the most votes. A candidate needs a majority — more than 50 percent of the votes — to win. If no candidate reaches that majority after all first-choice votes are counted, candidates with the fewest first-choice votes are eliminated. Then, ballots with first-choice votes for the eliminated candidate will get their votes transferred to their second-choice picks. And then vote totals are counted again. This goes on until one candidate remains. Our short explainer video below gives a good visual aid to demonstrate that process: That’s fine. Voters are only required to rank one candidate for your vote to count and up to a maximum of three. You can choose to not rank certain candidates at all, but you can’t give all three votes to one candidate. Well, you can fill your ballot out that way, but only one vote will be counted. For example, if I’m voting for my favorite lake in Minneapolis between Nokomis, Cedar and Harriet — and I definitely don’t want Harriet to win — I would rank both Nokomis and Cedar and leave my third choice blank. If I want Lake Nokomis to win, I’d rank it first, and if I was OK with Cedar Lake winning, too, I’d rank it second. That way my votes would count toward Nokomis and possibly Cedar (if Nokomis is eliminated — more on that below) but not toward Lake Harriet. You can’t give more than one candidate the same ranking. You’ll have to rank one above the other. That’s what’s called ballot exhaustion. Your vote won’t be transferred to any remaining candidate you didn’t rank. When and how can I vote? Early voting begins Friday, Sept. 17 in Minneapolis. Any resident can vote early in Minneapolis at 980 E. Hennepin Ave ., and St. Paul has several early voting locations . All Minnesotans can also apply to vote early by mail . Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 2. Find your polling place . MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
2.1%
Northampton Ranked Choice Voting Committee receives pointers
thereminder.com
Article
4256 chars
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NORTHAMPTON – During the Northampton Ranked Choice Voting Committee's Aug. 24 meeting, the committee received a presentation from Voter Choice Massachusetts about implementing ranked choice voting in Northampton. To start the presentation, Greg Dennis with Voter Choice said when coming up with a ranked choice voting system it is better to keep the process and report short. "Keep it short and sweet; we know the Amherst report was long. That was a very good and interesting report, but we do not think there is any need to delve into that amount of detail when implementing ranked choice for any municipality," he said. "At the end of the day, I think the meetings can be brief and you do not have to meet for a long period of time." Along with providing recommendations, Dennis also described some terminology and pitfalls to avoid with ranked choice voting including surplus transfer which moves votes based on the amount of votes a candidate receives. "In single winner ranked choice, if your candidate comes in last, you do not want that vote to be wasted so the vote gets transferred to the voter's next choice on the ballot. In a multi-seat election, you do not want your vote wasted on a very popular candidate and they could get way more votes than needed to get elected. In surplus transfer, if a candidate has more than enough votes to get elected, then you can transfer some of those votes to the voter's next choice," he said. Committee Vice Chair Catherine Kay said the idea of surplus transfer was troubling to her. "The concept of surplus transfer is initially troubling to me. I am thinking as a voter I want my vote to be my first-choice candidate. I want my vote added to that tally, from the voter's perspective I want that candidate to have as many votes as were voted for that candidate to show they have incredible support," she said. Andy Anderson from Voter Choice explained surplus transfer is important because it prevents all the first-choice votes from one group or political party going to one candidate, especially in the case that party is the majority, so their second choice gets the second seat in a multi-seat race. "That will still be on the record, that they had that support to begin with. The point of this is to ensure that you have majority control. The important thing is you do not want to have someone pulling all the first-choice votes and then not be able to help their colleague to get elected," he said. During his presentation, Dennis also discussed overvotes and skip ranks, two common mistakes voters make with ranked choice voting. "An overvote happens when you vote for more than one candidate in a single rank, for example if you picked two candidates for your first choice. Another pattern is a repeated rank, this is where you mark the same candidate in multiple ranks. Another scenario, called a skip rank is when you pick somebody first and leave the second rank blank,' he said. In terms of taking care of overvoting and skipping ranks, Dennis said municipalities tend to truncate the rank or skip over the rank in question and promote the others. "There are two different ways people handle these markings. One is truncating the ranking there and then, that rank and all other ranks are treated as if they are blank. The other thing you can do is skip over it and promote the later ranks," he said. Another commonly used technique in ranked choice voting is batch elimination, which can eliminate multiple candidates from a race at a time. "Batch elimination allows you to eliminate multiple candidates in a round, if the number of votes of those candidates you are eliminating combined do not have more votes than the next highest candidate," Dennis said. For his final recommendation, Dennis said the legislation for ranked choice voting should give its implementers flexibility in some of the details. "Our last bullet point is a recommendation not to over legislate, you do not need to put every detail into the legislation, you can leave yourself some leeway. If you have seen Easthampton's legislation it is short and says enough to explain what is going on and leaves some details up to the implementation," he said. The Northampton Ranked Choice Voting Committee next meets on Sept. 22. MORE→
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Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
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Group marches in Sheridan, reminds citizens to stay abreast of election law changes
wyomingnews.com
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Wyoming Tribune Eagle
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The Sheridan Press
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Sep 1, 2021

 
 
 
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Changes to council elections considered
mauinews.com
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mauinews.com
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Proposals to change the way the Maui County Council is elected are among the possible amendments to the County Charter that will be discussed at 9 a.m. Thursday by the Charter Commission. One potential amendment would change the election process from the current system in which residents can vote for council members in all nine […] MORE→
Proposals to change the way the Maui County Council is elected are among the possible amendments to the County Charter that will be discussed at 9 a.m. Thursday by the Charter Commission. One potential amendment would change the election process from the current system in which residents can vote for council members in all nine districts to a system of multidistrict electoral pods. There is also a proposal for a system of equally proportioned single-member districts. The commission is also considering shifting council elections to a ranked-choice voting system. If time permits, the commission may also take up proposals to change the county’s current budgetary process along with proposals dealing with ethics. The meeting is being held online via BlueJeans, and testimony will be accepted. To offer thoughts and suggestions for the commission, visit mauicounty.checkboxonline.com/amendments. Written testimony may be sent via email to Charter.Commission@mauicounty.gov. To join the meeting, visit bluejeans.com/422626918 or dial in toll free at (408) 915-6290 and enter meeting ID 422 626 918. MORE→
> 6 weeks
Sep 1, 2021
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