demo
Sign in
Status Fit Image Title Source Summary Content Date

 
 
 
0.2%
Navigating your 2021 Mpls. Municipal Election ballot
youtube.com
Video
0:01:22
YouTube
Kare 11
BingVideo
The election, which begins Friday, Sept. 17 with early voting, will use a ranked choice system. https://www.kare11.com/article/news/politics/elections/navigating-your-2021-minneapolis-municipal-election-ballot/89-bf06a6ee-c88f-4a04-9a25-7d2e4c750853 Welcome to the official YouTube channel of KARE 11 News. Subscribe to our channel for compelling ... MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 17, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Mayor on law that could allow 900K non-citizens to vote in NYC: It’s not legal at the city level
silive.com
Article
3927 chars
silive
Paul Liotta | Pliotta@Siadvance.Com
BingNews
Mayor Bill de Blasio made the comments during his morning appearance on the Brian Lehrer show.
City Council legislation that would extend the right to vote in city elections to more than 900,000 non-citizens might face a legal roadblock, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday. During his weekly appearance on WNYC’s Brian Lehrer show , the mayor said he had “mixed feelings” about the concept, but said he believed state law would block the specific legislation introduced by Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez (D-Manhattan). “Our Law Department is very clear on this. It’s (not) legal for this to be decided at the city level. I really believe this has to be decided at the state level, according to state law,” he said. The city Law Department didn’t respond to a request for comment by the time of publication on what part of state law would prevent the legislation from going into effect. Through changes to the city charter, the legislation would grant the vote to legal permanent residents and authorized workers in the state for at least 30 days before an election. A change to the charter, through a citywide referendum, brought ranked-choice voting to the city’s elections. Only municipal elections for city positions would be affected. State and federal elections would remain unchanged. Across the country, non-citizens have had varying rights to vote throughout history. In New York City, non-citizen parents had the right to vote in school board elections until 2002, when school boards were disbanded. The mayor said Friday that he had “mixed feelings” about the idea of non-citizens voting, because he thinks the ultimate goal should be encouraging people to become full citizens, “which is what we need to achieve more and more.” Rodriguez served as the primary sponsor for the current legislation when members introduced it in January 2020. It sat dormant for most of the pandemic, but is scheduled for a committee hearing next week. “Our City Our Vote,” a campaign pushing for non-citizen suffrage , estimates that Rodriguez’s legislation would add about 900,000 new voters to New York City’s rolls. The New York City Board of Elections would be responsible for their registration, and would need to produce different ballots for non-citizen voters. In response to a group of Staten Island Republicans criticizing the legislation earlier this week , Rodriguez said immigrants who pay into New York City’s coffers should also be allowed a say in their local representation, and expressed confidence that the bill would pass. “This is about living up to the words of no taxation without representation. Immigrants contribute billions to this country, yet during the height of the pandemic, they received crumbs,” he said. “People who pay their fair share of taxes deserve to choose their local representatives at the city level.” City Council candidate David Carr, who is also City Council Minority Leader Steven Matteo’s (R-Mid-Island chief of staff, City Councilman Joseph Borelli (R-South Shore), and Assemblyman Michael Tannousis (R-East Shore/South Brooklyn) held a media conference on the issue Tuesday outside the Richmond County Surrogate Court in St. George. Rep. Nicole Malliotakis (R-Staten Island/South Brooklyn), who is the daughter of immigrants, also expressed opposition to the legislation. “There is nothing more important than preserving the integrity of our election system,” she said in an emailed statement on Tuesday. “Government should be working to create more trust in our elections, not less.” MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 17, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Colorado Republicans who want to nix primaries point to this group as “manipulating” GOP races
coloradosun.com
Article
13462 chars
The Colorado Sun
Fish
BingNews
Some Republicans want to block the influence Unite America, a group that calls itself a voice for political moderation.
Republicans advocating for their party to opt out of Colorado’s primary elections next year are pointing to a national group’s spending in the GOP’s 2020 primaries as a prime reason that selecting candidates should be kept in-house. Unite America, which operates state and federal political action committees, got involved in Republican legislative primaries last year, backing candidates for several open seats who were seen as less conservative. The group spent nearly $456,000 supporting three GOP state House candidates and two Republican state Senate candidates. All five candidates won their primaries. “Millions of dollars by Democrats have been spent influencing and manipulating the outcomes of our nomination races,” state Rep. Dave Williams, a Colorado Springs Republican, said during a recent debate on the issue. He supports opting out of the primary. Unite America calls itself politically neutral and both supported and opposed Democrats in 2020 primaries. Records show the group’s biggest donor gave heavily to Democratic interests. But the group didn’t spend millions, as William claims. The Colorado Republican Party’s central committee, which has about 500 members, will vote Saturday in Pueblo on whether to opt out of the 2022 primaries and use a caucus and assembly process open only to party members. To pass, supporters need the backing of 75% of the central committee’s members, which appears unlikely to happen. Republicans who oppose opting out worry that barring unaffiliated voters, who make up 43% of the state’s registered voters, from the primary would damage GOP candidates in the 2022 general election . Unaffiliated voters have been allowed to participate in Colorado primaries since 2018. Unite America’s PAC donations are fully disclosed to the Federal Elections Commission. And it wasn’t the only super PAC involved in supporting or opposing GOP candidates in 2020, though it spent the most money . TODAY’S UNDERWRITER The group’s activities extend beyond Colorado, even though it’s based in Denver, and beyond candidate contests. The group’s website calls it a “movement of Democrats, Republicans and independents.” Executive Director Nick Troiano said Unite America is responding to “growing partisanship and polarization with leaders who are putting partisan interests over what’s in the public interest, refusing to work together to solve problems.” A rocky start for a middle-of-the-road approach Originally named the Centrist Project when it launched in 2013, Unite America moved to Denver in 2017 with a goal of supporting unaffiliated candidates in state-level contests. It didn’t work out in Colorado in 2018. Unite Colorado, the group’s state branch, supported five unaffiliated candidates running for the statehouse in Colorado and 25 other unaffiliated candidates nationwide. It spent about $300,000 in Colorado, mostly on independent advertising supporting the candidates or opposing their party-affiliated opponents, but all five of its candidates lost. A report on the efforts concluded “the midterm elections failed to demonstrate that there is any meaningful, existing constituency for centrist, independent candidates.” And Unite’s involvement in the 2018 races spawned a series of campaign finance complaints, some filed by people with Democratic ties , others by a conservative activist. In 2019, Unite America and affiliated groups agreed to pay a $9,000 fine and register as a political committee. Complaints against four candidates supported by the organization were dismissed just last month with no penalties. “The barrier to entry was larger than we even suspected,” Troiano said. “We decided to focus on nonpartisan electoral reforms that could level the playing field for new competition, and on the other hand, change the incentives for Democrats and Republicans who today are much more concerned about pandering to the base of their party than reaching across the aisle.” Challenging the two-party system is difficult, said Seth Masket, a political scientist who is director of the Center on American Politics at the University of Denver. “The two-party system is incredibly resilient,” he said. “That’s based partially on the style of elections we have in this country, but also two centuries of history.” So Unite America turned its focus to electoral reforms that might help more moderate candidates win elections. The group advocates for mail-in voting, redistricting reform, open primaries and ranked-choice voting. In 2020, for instance, Alaska adopted an open primary with the top four candidates moving to a general election with ranked-choice voting, where voters rank candidates in order of their preference. Unite America’s federal PAC spent nearly $2.3 million on the effort, which some believe will help moderate Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski fend off a challenge from the right in 2022. Colorado adopted all-mail voting in 2013. In 2016, voters agreed to allow unaffiliated voters to cast ballots in either the Republican or Democratic primaries, which took effect two years later. In 2018, voters adopted two constitutional amendments creating independent commissions to redraw congressional and state legislative districts. And the state is allowing municipalities to use ranked-choice voting. Unite America supported but wasn’t financially involved in those initiatives. Republicans decry outsider involvement in primaries Despite a focus on electoral reforms and the group’s failures in 2018, Unite America still got involved in 2020 candidate contests — just in a different way. Unite America’s federal super PAC raised $16.6 million in the 2020 election cycle, and nearly $10.6 million of that came from Kathryn Murdoch , a co-chair of Unite America’s board of directors. She’s married to James Murdoch, one of two sons of conservative media mogul Rupert Murdoch. But Kathryn and James Murdoch aren’t involved in Fox News, and in recent years have turned their philanthropic efforts to battle climate change. She’s also donated heavily to national Democratic PACs. Colorado’s Kent Thiry, a former DaVita CEO who spearheaded the open primaries and redistricting commission initiatives, donated $50,000 to Unite America’s PAC as well. That super PAC donated nearly $758,000 to the Unite Colorado Election Fund, and the state-level super PAC, in turn, donated nearly $528,000 to a group called Coloradans for Constitutional Values, which supported Republican primary candidates. And roughly $228,000 went to Better Leaders, Better Colorado, a group that supported Democratic primary candidates in Colorado. “In so many districts, the primary is the only election of consequence,” Trioano told The Sun in explaining his group’s strategy. “Partisan primaries are fueling division and disenfranchising voters and distorting the outcomes of these elections because so few people participate.” But Unite’s involvement was part of the political drama in Weld County , where three state House and one state Senate seats, all safe for Republicans, opened up in 2020 because the incumbents were term-limited. The Unite-funded super PAC Coloradans for Constitutional Values supported two of those House candidates considered less conservative than their opponents. But Coloradans for Constitutional Values wasn’t the only independent spender in state GOP primaries. Better Jobs Coalition and Ready Colorado Action Fund, both super PACs that typically support GOP candidates in the general election, also spent heavily in the Republican primaries. While the Unite America money can be traced back to donors, that’s more difficult with Better Jobs Coalition and Ready Colorado . Both also operate as nonprofits that donate heavily to their super PACs, so they’d be considered dark money groups since they don’t reveal their donors. Dan Woog, of Erie, and Tonya Van Beber, of Eaton, and incumbents state Rep. Colin Larson, of Littleton, and Sen. Bob Rankin, of Carbondale, all won their primaries with support from Unite America funded PAC . The PAC also supported Cleave Simpson, of Alamosa, in his state Senate contest though he wasn’t opposed in the primary. Sen. Chris Hansen, a Denver Democrat, won his primary, with support from Better Leaders, Better Colorado , while Arvada Democrat John Ronquillo lost despite the support. The PAC also supported four other Democrats who didn’t face primaries and won the general election: Sen. James Coleman, of Denver, Rep. Judy Amabile, of Boulder, Rep. Jennifer Bacon, of Denver, and Rep. Lindsey Daugherty, of Arvada. “We want people who are going to put Colorado first and not any particular political party,” said Terrance Carroll, a former Democratic state House speaker who is the director for Unite Colorado. But Williams and other Republicans advocating for their party to opt out of the 2022 primaries contend that outside groups spending money in GOP primaries dilutes their party’s brand. “I guarantee you Terrance Carroll is not spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote the strongest Republican candidate who will defend the majority of, if not all, of the party platform,” Williams said during the recent debate. Yet Woog voted with the conservative Colorado Union of Taxpayers 81% of the time, Van Beber 69% and Larson 60%. Woog voted “yes” on only 41.5% of the bills that became law this year, while Van Beber voted “yes” on 54% and Larson on 60.2%, according to a Colorado Sun analysis . Woog defeated Pat Miller, a former GOP House member from Erie. Miller said she doesn’t want to see Republicans eliminate the primary, but she doesn’t think unaffiliated voters should be allowed to participate. “I don’t want an open primary,” she said. “It should be strictly Republicans or Democrats.” But unaffiliated voters have participated more heavily on the Democratic side in the three primaries thus far. They made up nearly 33% of the total 1.6 million primary voters in 2020, but only 25% of the nearly 591,000 Republican voters. Justin Everett, a former state lawmaker who lost to Larson in the 2020 primary, isn’t a member of the Colorado GOP’s central committee, but he supports the opt-out push. “I think it’s going to help Republicans be more electable in the general” election, he said. Political scientist Masket questions that logic, however. “It’s a factional dispute within the Republican Party,” Masket said. “You have some of the more establishment types who want to keep the primaries… and others who are worried that they don’t have the control over the party’s nominees that they want. They want to move the party further right. That won’t necessarily win them more statewide races.” Colorado Sun staff writer Jesse Paul contributed to this report. The Colorado Sun has no paywall, meaning readers do not have to pay to access stories. We believe vital information needs to be seen by the people impacted, whether it’s a public health crisis, investigative reporting or keeping lawmakers accountable. This reporting depends on support from readers like you. For just $5/month, you can invest in an informed community. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 17, 2021

 
 
 
0%
ASCSU talks ranked-choice voting and committee appointments
collegian.com
Article
5121 chars
collegian.com
News
BingNews
The 51st senate of the Associated Students of Colorado State University convened Sept. 15 for their third session of the semester to hear a presentation on facilities-related committees across CSU’s campus, introduce a bill resolution and hold elections for the Legislative Strategy Advisory Board. MORE→
You are here: / / Campus / ASCSU talks ranked-choice voting and committee appointments ASCSU talks ranked-choice voting and committee appointments Piper Russell Campus , The 51st senate of the Associated Students of Colorado State University convened on Wednesday, Sept. 15, for their third session of the semester to hear a presentation on facilities-related committees across CSU’s campus, introduce a bill resolution and hold elections for the Legislative Strategy Advisory Board. ASCSU heard a presentation by Fred Haberecht, leader of landscape architecture, environmental graphics and master planning for CSU Facilities Management and Jessica Kramer, landscape architect and environmental graphic designer with Facilities Management. The presentation focused on explaining opportunities for involvement in various facilities-related committees across CSU. Committees included the Master Plan Committee, the Physical Development Committee and the Inclusive Physical and Virtual Campus Committee. According to Haberecht, the Master Plan Committee is composed of several vice presidents, members of ASCSU and a standing member of the Office of the Provost and the vice president for University operations. The committee will make decisions about where buildings will go at CSU and what investments the University will prioritize. “It’s about all campus infrastructure and buildings and the land’s highest, best use,” Haberecht said. The Physical Development Committee includes deans, department heads, directors and members of ASCSU. This committee will look at tactical decisions across campus, including naming buildings and the bicycle network. The Inclusive Physical and Virtual Campus Committee includes people from the Office of Inclusive Excellence, the Student Disability Center, Housing & Dining Services and some technology representatives. This committee has worked on things such as adding all-gender restrooms and reflection rooms to campus. The committee will also do assessments of accessibility across campus. “We were really charged with making sure that our campus feels welcoming and inclusive in our physical and our virtual environments,” Kramer said. “We worked really hard to pass the inclusive campus policy to set forth that yes, this is important to CSU.” The presentation also included information on the University Public Art Committee , Pollinator Friendly Campus Committee , Tree Campus Higher Education program and the President’s Vision Zero Task Force. Jasper Sloss and Alayna Truxal presented a resolution on implementing ranked-choice voting in ASCSU. “Ranked-choice voting is kind of a little more complex of a method than picking one candidate, but it offers more power back to the voters, and it encourages candidates to appeal to everyone instead of small portions,” Sloss said. The resolution endorses research and exploration into ranked-choice voting and working with the Attica Voting group. “What this resolution is intended to do is express support through ASCSU for the idea of more equitable voting reform and hopefully, in the future, look at what those options look like,” Sloss said. “And right now, we believe that’s rank(ed)-choice voting.” ASCSU also held elections for the Legislative Strategy Advisory Board, which includes members of the executive and legislative branches of ASCSU. “The point of this group is to figure out what we as the student body want to prioritize on a state level,” said Erin Freeman, chief justice of the ASCSU Supreme Court. University Affairs Committee Chairman Evan Welch and Senators Isaac Neivert, Bailey Shepherd, Sam Moccia and Ryan Pyfrom were nominated for the three available positions on the Legislative Strategy Advisory Board. Senator Moccia was elected to the board with 13 votes, Senator Shepherd with nine votes and Chair Welch with three votes. Moccia, Shepherd and Welch were sworn in. Piper Russell can be reached at or on Twitter @PiperRussell10 . MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 17, 2021

 
 
 
0%
As campaigning continues
hometownsource.com
Article
1227 chars
hometownsource.com
Mike Hanks Community Editor
Newscatcher
As candidates continue to stump for votes across Bloomington, voters can begin casting their ballot this week for the City Council and school board elections.
remaining of Thank you for reading! On your next view you will be asked to log in to your subscriber account or create an account and subscribe purchase a subscription to continue reading.
> 4 weeks
Sep 17, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
SA Senate approves three referenda that could shake up future senate elections
gwhatchet.com
Article
7321 chars
The GW Hatchet
BingNews
The SA Senate voted to set a referendum that may bring first-year senators back to the SA through the first fall elections in the SA’s history.
The Student Association Senate approved holding three referenda Monday that could bring major changes to future senate elections if passed by the student body. Students will soon vote on three constitutional amendments to establish first-year senate seats, change multi-seat senate races from ranked-choice voting to a plurality system and divide at-large senate positions into separate undergraduate and graduate seats. Members of a special elections committee, which will be appointed by SA President Brandon Hill and confirmed by the senate, will determine the date for the referenda vote within 20 class days of Monday’s senate action. The First-Year Senators Amendment Act calls a referendum asking students if the SA should hold elections for first-year senators each fall, which would go into effect this semester if passed. The referendum would amend the recently updated SA constitution, which prohibits reserved seats for first-year senators, although freshmen can still be appointed to vacant University at-large seats. If students pass the referendum by majority vote, a special elections committee will organize a fall election for first-year, at-large graduate and undergraduate senator seats as soon as possible, according to the legislation. SA Sen. Chris Pino, CCAS-U and the sponsor of the legislation, said if the referendum passes, the subsequent election would be restricted to first-year undergraduates, graduate and transfer students to elect the new senators. “None of these students receive representation until a full year into their studies, which is preposterous,” Pino said at the meeting. Pino proposed a similar resolution at the last senate meeting, but the move failed . At this week’s meeting, the resolution surpassed the two-thirds majority needed for passage with 30 votes in favor, three opposed and five abstentions. Pino said he collaborated with members of the Student Court, the executive cabinet and other senators to ensure this resolution could be executed constitutionally, adding that he was “elated” for the chance to give first-year students a voice in the senate. “I’m so excited that first-year students at GW will potentially get to have the voice within our senate again,” Pino said. “This is a really important issue, and I’m so glad that it’s going to battle again.” Hill, the SA president, voiced opposition to the resolution over concerns about potential low turnout for the referendum vote, which would enable a small portion of students to amend the SA constitution. He said he was prepared to seek the Student Court’s opinion on the amendment. “This is not about my alleged hate for first-year students, as I too was a first-year student when I got involved in the SA, but it’s about our dire need for legitimacy and student input,” Hill said at the meeting. SA Sen. Charlene Richards, CCAS-U, said first-year students deserve a seat in the senate because they pay the SA fee, a $45 charge every undergraduate student pays as part of their costs of attending GW. As a former first-year senator, Richards said she understands how the seats provide a platform for first-year students to bring their concerns to someone in their class. “Let’s not forget that first-year students still have to pay the Student Association fee, yet they receive no direct representation in choosing who makes those decisions to allocate SA funds and budget,” Richards said. Senators also unanimously voted to call another referendum asking students whether the SA should implement a plurality voting system for senate races with multiple seats rather than ranked-choice voting. If the referendum passes, students would be able to vote for multiple candidates up to the number of seats available in those races. Senators unanimously passed the Fall Senate Elections Act , which would codify the two referenda into the SA’s bylaws if they are passed by the student body. SA Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and the senate chairperson pro tempore, said she supported the switch to plurality at-large voting because it works better for multi-seat elections, adding that the wrong form of ranked choice voting was used in her senate election last year and resulted in inaccurate results. “I was part of the race that was recalled last year because they used the wrong form of ranked-choice voting,” Scales said. “If we had plurality voting, we probably would have not had that mess up.” The senate also unanimously approved the Proportional Representation Act to call a third referendum that would divide at-large senate positions for the Milken Institute School of Public Health, School of Nursing, School of Medicine and Health Science and the College of Professional Studies into separate undergraduate and graduate positions. At the meeting, SA Vice President Kate Carpenter also announced three recent senate resignations. SA Sens. Onyinye Ijeh, G-At-Large, Jovawn McNeil, ESIA-U, and Charlotte Gaynor, SEAS-G, all resigned within the last two weeks, Carpenter said. The senate is now left with four total vacancies after former SA Sen. Adam Synder, MIPH-U, resigned last month. Ijeh, an Elliott School of International Affairs student, said she resigned from her seat because no one notified her she would be nominated to the senate until the day of her confirmation. She said she was rejected by the governance and nominations committee over the summer, so she made different plans for the upcoming school year. “I just didn’t really understand what was happening,” Ijeh said in an email. “I was denied earlier in the summer and had made other plans (I now have a full time job) and so would not be able to balance SA, school and my work schedule. I’m really grateful for the opportunity but I would not be able to commit as fully as I would like to.” Gaynor said she works full time as a middle school teacher and no longer has enough time to dedicate to the SA. McNeil declined to comment. The senate also confirmed second-year law student Devin Eager as a Student Court justice, filling the last vacancy on the seven-person bench. This article appeared in the September 16, 2021 issue of the Hatchet. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 16, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
COUNTERPOINT: Scrap gerrymandering, adopt ranked choice
bozemandailychronicle.com
Article
199 chars
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Rob Richie And David Daley Insidesources.Com (Tns)
BingNews
Partisan gerrymandering of legislative districts has been a uniquely American problem since our founding: As long as we’ve had politicians, they’ve exploited the power to pick their own voters before
> 4 weeks
Sep 16, 2021

 
 
 
3.0%
Constable: Elections with ranked choice voting? I'd drink to that
dhbusinessledger.com
Article
5545 chars
Daily Herald Business Ledger
Burt Constable
BingNews
Whether you are selecting a beer, a cookie or a U.S. president, ranked choice voting makes sense, Burt says.
Constable: Elections with ranked choice voting? I'd drink to that hello The idea of ranked choice voting has been around so long that my first attempt to explain it in a column used the example of someone walking into his local Blockbuster store, only to discover that someone else had rented the video he wanted to pop into his VCR. The League of Women Voters of Roselle-Bloomingdale offered a timeless illustration of ranked choice voting at this summer's Taste of Roselle by letting voters fill out ballots to determine the favorite cookie from a host of options. video "I believe Oreos won," says Roberta Borrino, co-president of the group, which is adding a new twist to its ranked choice voting education efforts next week by using alcohol. The "Rank Your Beer!" fundraiser from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday will take place in the outdoor beer garden at Pollyanna Brewing Co ., 245 E. Main St., Roselle. A ticket costs $25 and includes one flight of four different beers and appetizers. For details, visit lwvrb.org . Just as ranked choice voting works with voters for political candidates, each beer voter will rank the choices of Fruhauf (an Octoberfest lager), Eleanor (a porter), In The Cards (a hazy pale ale) and Blueberry Allure (a Berliner Weisse). If none of the options garners more than 50% of the vote, the beer with the fewest first-place votes is eliminated and the second-place votes on those ballots are counted. If that doesn't produce a majority winner, then the next least-popular candidate is eliminated and the second-place votes on those ballots are counted. "I think a lot of people, once they realize what it is, it's a no-brainer," says Andrew Szilva, president of FairVote Illinois , which formed in 2020 to advocate for ranked choice voting for candidates for public office. Imagine George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Eleanor Roosevelt and Adolf Hitler running in a primary race for one open school board seat. Washington gets 25% of the vote, Lincoln gets 25%, Roosevelt gets 24%, and Hitler, hated by 74% of voters, wins the election with 26% of the votes. Under ranked choice voting, Roosevelt's last-place finish would drop her from the running and allow the system to count the second choices on those ballots. If those votes were equally split between Lincoln and Washington, they'd each have 37% of the vote, dropping Hitler to last place among the remaining candidates. The system would then eliminate Hitler and use the second choices on those ballots, which would give either Lincoln or Washington the win and the support of the majority of voters. Since World War II, seven presidents have been elected with less than 50% of the popular vote: Donald Trump (46%) in 2016, George W. Bush (47.9%) in 2000, Bill Clinton (43%) in 1991, and (49.2%) in 1996, Richard Nixon (43.4%) in 1968, John Kennedy (49.7) in 1960, and Harry Truman (49.4%) in 1948. "People are saying, 'Wait. There has to be a better solution,'" says Szilva. If ranking had been used in all those presidential races, the second-place votes on ballots for losing candidates such as Ralph Nader, Gary Johnson, Ross Perot, George Wallace or Strom Thurmond could have changed the election, and at least ensured that the president captured a majority of the votes. There's nothing complicated about ranked choice voting, which sometimes is called "instant runoff." You pick whom you want to win as your first choice, then rank the rest of the candidates in order of your preference. Maine and Alaska use ranked choice voting for statewide and presidential elections. Wyoming, Kansas and Nevada used it in the 2020 presidential Democratic primaries. Utah, California, Florida, Michigan, Massachusetts, Oregon, Colorado, New Mexico, Minnesota, Vermont, Maryland, Delaware, Tennessee, New York and Springfield, Illinois, use it to decide some local elections. In the Chicago mayoral race that had 14 candidates, Lori Lightfoot got 17.5% of the vote, Toni Preckwinkle got 16%, and Bill Daley got 14.8%, while the majority (51.7%) chose other candidates. Only the top two were involved in the runoff election, which cost additional money, and the outcome might have changed with ranked choice voting. A poll after the New York mayoral race showed that 77% of voters liked ranked choice voting, 86% ranked more than one candidate, and 95% (regardless of party, age, race, gender or other factors) thought the process was easy, Szilva says. There are no "wasted votes," and early voters whose top pick then drops out of the race still have a say. In 2002, Arizona Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain backed ranked choice voting, as did young Democratic state Sen. Barack Obama, who introduced a bill in the Illinois legislature, which is still pondering the issue. With only four choices, Monday's beer voting could produce a winner on the first count. That wouldn't illustrate the effectiveness of ranked choice voting the way it would if there were 17 beers on the ballot. But no one wants that sort of election hangover. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 16, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Brooklyn Park survey to ask questions on water softening
hometownsource.com
Article
1364 chars
hometownsource.com
Kevin Miller
Newscatcher
This year, Brooklyn Park’s resident survey, commonly used to measure perceptions and satisfaction with city services, will gauge resident interest on water softening, ranked-choice voting and chicken keeping, among other MORE→
remaining of Thank you for reading! On your next view you will be asked to log in to your subscriber account or create an account and subscribe purchase a subscription to continue reading.
> 4 weeks
Sep 16, 2021

 
 
 
1.7%
LGBTQ Democrats briefed on DC ranked choice voting bill
washingtonblade.com
Article
3817 chars
Washington Blade
Lou Chibbaro Jr.
Newscatcher
Council may already have enough votes to pass it
Under the ranked choice voting system, if a candidate receives more than 50 percent of the “first choice” votes, the candidate is declared the winner. But if no candidate receives greater than 50 percent of the first-choice votes in a race where there are three or more candidates, the system provides an instant runoff. “The candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and voters who picked that candidate will have their votes count for their next choice,” according to a statement released by Henderson at the time she introduced the legislation. “This process continues in rounds until there’s a majority winner,” the statement says. T.J. Maloney, Henderson’s chief of staff, told Capital Stonewall Democrats members during a virtual Zoom meeting that studies of the ranked choice voting system in jurisdictions where it has been adopted show that overall voter turnout has increased and, following a voter education process, voters appear to adjust and support the system. Six other D.C. Council members joined Henderson in co-introducing the VOICE ranked choice voting bill, indicating it may already have a seven-vote majority in its favor on the 13-member Council. However, Council Chair Phil Mendelson (D-At-Large) does not support the current version of the bill, according to spokesperson Lindsay Walton. Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), the chair of the Council’s Judiciary Committee where the bill was sent, has not scheduled a hearing on the bill, even though Allen is one of the bill’s co-introducers. Last week, the D.C. Democratic State Committee, which is the governing body of the D.C. Democratic Party and of which the Capital Stonewall Democrats is an affiliated member, voted to oppose the VOICE Act legislation. Some of its members said they believe a ranked choice voting system would be beneficial to the city’s smaller political party candidates, including Republicans and Statehood Green Party candidates, and would place Democratic Party candidates at a disadvantage. Gay Democratic activist John Fanning, who was an unsuccessful candidate for the Ward 2 D.C. Council seat in the 2020 D.C. Democratic primary, said he favors a simple runoff election system over a ranked choice voting system in cases where multiple candidates run, and none receive at least 50 percent of the vote. Among the ranked choice bill’s supporters is gay Democratic activist Austin Naughton, who serves as chair of the Ward 2 Democratic Committee. Naughton told the Washington Blade he is not an expert on the ranked choice voting system but his initial research into the system leads him to believe the system has the potential for providing a greater electoral voice for minority communities, including possibly the LGBTQ community and LGBTQ candidates who run for public office. Capital Stonewall Democrats President Jatarious Frazier said the group was in the process of learning more about the ranked file voting system. No one raised the issue of the group taking a position on the legislation at Monday night’s meeting. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 15, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Letter: Study ranked-choice voting
columbian.com
Article
1105 chars
The Columbian
Brenda Norton, Vancouver
Newscatcher
I commend our Clark County Charter Review Commission Subcommittee on ranked-choice voting for their efforts to make our county elections better, faster and cheaper.
I commend our Clark County Charter Review Commission Subcommittee on ranked-choice voting for their efforts to make our county elections better, faster and cheaper. Since this subcommittee was formed earlier this year, they have worked diligently to learn from election advocacy groups, scholars and other municipalities that use ranked choice. In the meetings I’ve attended, they’ve seen evidence this type of voting is election reform that is proven to increase competition, ensure majority winners and save taxpayer dollars — elements that have been missing from our elections for far too long. As our county charter review subcommittee continues to explore more about how ranked-choice voting can benefit our county, I encourage Clark County voters to support the work our commissioners are doing by educating themselves on ranked-choice voting. You might just be surprised at how easy, secure and fair elections can be. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 15, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Four Thoughts on the California Recall
nationalreview.com
Article
6281 chars
nationalreview.com
Dan Mclaughlin
BingNews
Recall elections for governors are a Progressive-era gimmick, and like other electoral gimmicks.
First, the California recall ended the way anyone who has followed California politics in the past three decades would normally have expected. With the exception of Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2003 and 2006, no Republican has broken 45 percent of the vote in a statewide election for president, senator, or governor in California since 1994. At the presidential level, Democrats have carried California by at least 23 points and 3 million votes in each of the past four elections; only Hawaii and D.C. have consistently given Democrats wider margins. In Senate races, thanks to California’s bizarre jungle-primary system, Republicans haven’t even had a candidate on the November ballot in almost a decade. It’s one of nine states in which Republicans have now gone 15 years without a win in the big three statewide elections, the others being Washington, Oregon, Delaware, New York, Hawaii, Rhode Island, Minnesota, and Connecticut. (Virginia, which last elected a Republican in 2009, is next on that list.) In short, it is as hard a place for Republicans to win an election as any state in the union. No matter how excited people got about the possibility of finally breaking that streak, and no matter how the polling looked for a while, Gavin Newsom beating Larry Elder is a dog-bites-man story. This is also why it is silly to blame election fraud — something Elder himself has not done, as he conceded the race — when the lopsided Democratic win is the baseline, expected outcome. Second, recalls are stupid and should be eliminated, or at least require a supermajority vote. Recall elections for governors are a Progressive-era gimmick, and like other electoral gimmicks — runoffs , the jungle primary, ranked-choice voting , dividing electoral votes by congressional district — they run against the grain of the American system of two-party democracy. This is the fourth of these elections in our history, with two successful recalls and two failed ones. There is no substitute for building the broadest possible coalitions at periodic elections through the two-party system, and California should eliminate both the recall and the jungle primary. Third, blaming Larry Elder for the outcome is treating the symptom and not the problem. True, it would have been easier to win this race if it were a pure referendum on Newsom, and the emergence of a clear Republican front-runner made it easier for Newsom to frame this as a binary choice . But this is not a regular election, in which the goal was to run a candidate who could make a positive case for a majority. The only way the recall would have succeeded is by having a lopsided enthusiasm advantage for Republicans. Polls showed that early, but the California Democrats have a superior organization and more voters, so they were able to activate enough of their people to make the result a more traditional one. And in any event, Elder would not have been able to do much as governor, and would surely have lost in 2022. The problem is that Republicans do not have a candidate and message that appeal to a majority — or even a plurality — of Californians, or anything close to that. It’s that simple. Four, exit polls showed (compared to 2020) white college-educated voters swinging even further to Democrats, about a 5–6 point erosion of the Democrats’ advantage with black voters and the Republicans’ advantage with white noncollege-educated voters . . . but over a 30-point swing to Republicans among Hispanic voters. The Yes vote got 44 percent of white voters, 42 percent of Hispanics (including 47 percent of Hispanic men ), 38 percent of Asians, and 19 percent of black voters. Those are actually all good numbers for Republicans except the white voters, who made up 56 percent of the electorate, lower than in most of the country but higher than in a typical general election in California. What does that mean? It means that the model of starting with a lead among white voters that works elsewhere in the country is unworkable in California, but also that Democrats are losing ground among Hispanics, and fast. My bet is that, when Republicans finally win a race again in California — and they will, because nothing is forever in American democracy — it will be behind a Hispanic candidate who builds a message that wins an actual majority of the Hispanic vote. That may be someone who looks and sounds different than, say, Marco Rubio in Florida, Ted Cruz in Texas, Susanna Martinez in New Mexico, or Brian Sandoval in Nevada, because California’s demographics and culture are different. But it is the likeliest path to assemble something that actually flies. NOW WATCH: 'Biden Admin Considers Using Civil Rights Law to Challenge GOP Governors’ Anti-Mask Mandate Orders' Related Videos Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcuts Keyboard Shortcuts Play/Pause SPACE Increase Volume ↑ Decrease Volume ↓ Seek Forward → Seek Backward ← s On/Off c Fullscreen/Exit Fullscreen f Mute/Unmute m Seek % 0-9 Copied Copied 00:00 01:55 01:55 This video file cannot be played.(Error Code: 224003) Watch: 1:55 Biden Admin Considers Using Civil Rights Law to Challenge GOP Governors’ Anti-Mask Mandate Orders MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 15, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Chalupa Wins 2021 Riverside Park GOAT Election
bwog.com
Article
4183 chars
Bwog
Sam Seliger
BingNews
It’s the battle of the goats, in Riverside Park. The Riverside Park Conservancy held the closing ceremony for its 2021 Vote-the-GOAT ceremony on Tuesday, announcing the results of an election that lasted through the summer months to choose the favorite of five goats living in the northernmost section of the park. Chalupa, the runner-up in […] MORE→
It’s the battle of the goats, in Riverside Park. The Riverside Park Conservancy held the closing ceremony for its 2021 Vote-the-GOAT ceremony on Tuesday, announcing the results of an election that lasted through the summer months to choose the favorite of five goats living in the northernmost section of the park. Chalupa, the runner-up in the previous GOAT vote, was named the winner using the new ranked-choice voting system; newcomer Ms. Bo Peep finished in second. The Conservancy brought the goats to Riverside Park from their home farm in Westchester for the summer to rid the park of invasive plant species. Goats can eat up to 25% of their body weight each day, allowing them to serve as highly effective landscapers. The goats were welcomed in with a Running of the Goats in July, in which 24 goats were led down the length of Riverside Park up to 125th street, where the “fabulous five” were escorted into their new summer home. 2021 marked the second time that goats were brought in; the “Goatham” initiative began in 2019 but was canceled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Park visitors were able to visit the five goats, Chalupa, Ms. Bo Peep, Skittles, Mallomar, and Buckles throughout the summer and observe them munching on weeds in a fenced-in enclosure that featured placards about the invasive plants like Poison Ivy and Porcelain Berry that the goats were brought in to eat. Visitors were encouraged to vote on the Conservancy website for their favorite goat, using a new online ranked-choice voting system allowing them to rank up to all five candidates. In the closing ceremony, Conservancy President and CEO Dan Garodnick recapped the goats’ work, while State Assemblypeople Daniel O’Donnell and Linda B. Rosenthal gave short speeches to celebrate the initiative. The event was well attended, and conservancy staff gave out free goat-themed tote bags and sold t-shirts. George Shea, MC for the annual Nathan’s Hotdog Eating Contest and co-founder of Major League Eating, introduced the goats in his trademark verbose and rapid style worthy of the world’s premiere competitive eaters. Garodnick announced the election results and presented each goat with a trophy and celebratory feeding. Skittles, from the Eat Your Greens Party, was favored thanks to her reputation as a local and strong performance as a finalist back in 2019. Billed as a “seasoned park veteran,” she was labeled the favorite by the New York Times at the election’s outset. She faded down the stretch, however, and finished a disappointing third. Skittles was eager to leave the ceremony after results were announced, and did not linger for pictures as long as her peers. After Buckles and Mallomar were eliminated as well, placing fifth and fourth respectively, the competition came down to Hillclimbers for a Better New York’s “wildcard rookie” Ms. Bo Peep and the hardworking 2019 runner-up Chalupa, from GOG (Grand Old Goat) Party. Bo Peep, an idealistic newcomer who promised “to turn New York onto a fully organic, pro-biotic, vegan, plant-based diet,” stirred controversy during the race with her aggressive campaigning, including an attack ad claiming that Skittles and Buckles were “in the pocket of Big Pesticide.” Although this strategy may have bolstered her campaign, pushing her past some established favorites, it was not enough to overcome Chalupa’s 526 votes, roughly half of all votes cast. All photos by Sam Seliger for Bwog. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 15, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Arlington candidates line up behind ranked-choice voting
insidenova.com
Article
413 chars
INSIDENOVA.COM
Scott Mccaffrey, Sun Gazette Newspapers
BingNews
All four of those on the Nov. 2 Arlington County Board ballot have professed their fealty to holding future County Board elections via a ranked-choice method, but challengers say the
Real-time social media posts from local businesses and organizations across Northern Virginia, powered by Friends2Follow. To add your business to the stream, email cfields@insidenova.com or click on the green button below. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 15, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Staten Island Republicans rally against City Council push to give 900,000 non-citizens a vote in NYC elections
silive.com
Article
8130 chars
silive
Paul Liotta | Pliotta@Siadvance.Com
BingNews
The bill would grant legal permanent residents and authorized workers in the state the right to vote in NYC elections.
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A trio of local Republicans held a media conference in St. George Tuesday to speak out against a push in the City Council to give non-citizens the right to vote in city elections. In front of the Richmond County Surrogate Court, prospective Mid-Island City Council candidate David Carr, who is City Council Minority Leader Steven Matteo’s chief of staff, City Councilman Joe Borelli (R-South Shore), and Assemblyman Mike Tannousis (R-East Shore/Brooklyn) spoke out against the legislation that would grant those authorized to work or lawful permanent residents the right to vote in municipal elections. “We believe that citizenship is a requirement to run and hold public office in this city, as well as to be able to vote in elections in public office in this city,” Carr said. “Citizenship comes with certain responsibilities and one of those is choosing the leaders that are going to represent us.” Rep. Nicole Malliotakis (R-Staten Island/South Brooklyn), who is the daughter of immigrants, also expressed opposition to the legislation that would only apply to local elections, and not state and federal elections. Through changes to the city charter, it would grant the vote to legal permanent residents and authorized workers in the state for at least 30 days before an election. “I am the son of immigrants,” Tannousis said. “My dad came here and worked hard. He got his papers in order, became an American citizen, and votes in every single election, because he worked hard to have that right to vote. It is very, very important that that right is reserved for American citizens.” Across the country, non-citizens have had varying rights to vote throughout history. In New York City, non-citizen parents had the right to vote in school board elections until 2002, when school boards were disbanded. There have been multiple efforts at the state and local level in New York to provide non-citizens with the right to vote in those elections. The federal government prohibited such participation in federal elections in 1996, but allows states and municipalities to run their own elections. Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez (D-Manhattan) served as the primary sponsor for the current legislation when members introduced it in January 2020. It sat dormant for most of the pandemic, but is scheduled for a committee hearing later this month. “Our City Our Vote,” a campaign pushing for non-citizen suffrage , estimates that Rodriguez’s legislation would add about 900,000 new voters to New York City’s rolls. The New York City Board of Elections would be responsible for their registration, and would need to produce different ballots for non-citizen voters. In response to the Staten Islanders’ press conference, Rodriguez said immigrants who pay into New York City’s coffers should also be allowed a say in their local representation, and expressed confidence that the bill would pass. “This is about living up to the words of no taxation without representation. Immigrants contribute billions to this country, yet during the height of the pandemic, they received crumbs,” he said. “People who pay their fair share of taxes deserve to choose their local representatives at the city level.” Of the nine council members on the Committee on Governmental Operation, which has a hearing on the bill scheduled for Sept. 20, six — including Rodriguez and committee chair, Councilman Fernando Cabrera (D-the Bronx) — are sponsors of the legislation. An additional 26 council members and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams are also sponsoring the bill. The office of City Councilwoman Debi Rose, who is not a sponsor of the legislation, did not respond to a request for comment by the time of publication. Mayor Bill de Blasio has not taken a concrete position on non-citizen voting, and in February said he wanted to take some time to think about Rodriguez’s legislation. His office did not respond to a request for comment by the time of publication Tuesday. The mayor and many of the council members supporting the legislation are due to leave office at the end of the year. The charter revision that brought ranked-choice voting to the city was brought through a citywide referendum. “They waited until after the primaries to even begin talking about this issue in earnest,” Borelli said. “They’re aware that this is fundamentally unpopular. They don’t want to go through the traditional charter revision of going through a public referendum, because they know most people will not choose to water-down their own votes.” In February, the Daily News reported on Rodriguez’s legislative push and the support of mayoral candidate Eric Adams — the ultimate victor of the June 22 Democratic primary. Given the political realities of New York City, Carr, whose father is an immigrant from the United Kingdom, said he hoped to pressure some of the council members who had already signed on to support the bill. “Make members fight for this if that’s really what they’re going to do,” he said. “This is something that people need to campaign on, and need to get the public’s input on if they’re going to do this legitimately.” During the morning media conference, Borelli took the opportunity to criticize his and Carr’s Democratic opponents, Olivia Drabczyk and Sal Albanese, in their upcoming November elections. In his 2013 mayoral run, Albanese expressed support for non-citizen voting, according to a report from Talking Points Memo at the time . “As an immigrant myself, I remember what it was like trying to learn the language and to fit in,” Albanese said, according to Talking Points Memo. “We need to engage immigrants, make sure they have access to services, and get them involved in their neighborhoods. Giving permanent residents the right to vote is a first step toward make that happen.” Albanese said Tuesday that the report mischaracterized his position. He said he opposes the specific legislation and the idea of non-citizen voting. Legislation at the time was almost identical to what’s currently proposed. Only non-citizens would have had to have met the qualifications. “I was misquoted, because that’s not what I meant,” he said. “All I can tell you is that I’m opposed to non-residency voting.” Albanese, who is an Italian immigrant, is the Democratic candidate in the race to replace Matteo. George Wonica is the Conservative Party candidate. Carr is the presumptive nominee for the Republican Party, but his closest primary opponent, Marko Kepi, is still challenging the June primary results in court. Drabcyzk, who is Borelli’s opponent, could not be reached for comment by the time of publication, but has not publicly taken a position on non-citizen voting, as her spokeswoman, Julienne Verdi, pointed out. “Maybe Joe Borelli should divert his time and attention from fear mongering and headline grabbing to actually aiding his constituents struggling in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and a deadly pandemic,” she said. Borelli has been a vocal advocate for more resources in his district throughout the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, and spent the night that remnants of Hurricane Ida decimated the borough helping a friend whose home had been flooded. Since the storm, he’s also continued his advocacy for improvements to infrastructure. Should the legislation pass committee, it will go to a full City Council vote later this year, and will need to be signed by the mayor. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Maui Charter Commission to Consider Proposing Ranked-Choice Voting
mauinow.com
Article
3909 chars
Maui Now
BingNews
At the upcoming meeting Commissioners will consider whether to adopt ranked-choice voting as the electoral system for council elections.  A ranked-choice voting system is one in which voters may rank candidates by preference on their ballots, a significant change from our current system whereby voters may only vote for one candidate in each race. MORE→
The Charter Commission is evaluating substantial changes to our county’s Charter, and at its last meeting voted to propose a Charter amendment to create three voter districts within the County. At the upcoming meeting Commissioners will consider whether to adopt ranked-choice voting as the electoral system for council elections. A ranked-choice voting system is one in which voters may rank candidates by preference on their ballots, a significant change from our current system whereby voters may only vote for one candidate in each race. The Charter Commission wants to hear your thoughts on these, and other, important topics concerning Maui County government. To offer your recommendations visit mauichartersurvey.org . The public is also encouraged to send written testimony via email to [email protected] For more information and to join Maui Charter Commission meetings via BlueJeans follow the link on the Commission website http://www.mauicounty.gov/CharterCommission . MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Five rounds of voting, coin toss wins Stevenson a spot on Portage School Board
wiscnews.com
Article
1798 chars
Wiscnews.com
Susan Endres
BingNews
The Portage School Board chose its new member Monday from a field of nine candidates after five rounds of voting and a coin toss.
About the new member A former public school teacher and currently a stay-at-home mother to four children, Stevenson said she felt like serving on the board would be a perfect fit. Her children attend the district, she said. “Education has been my passion since young adulthood and serving the community in this capacity would be an honor,” she said. “It seems easier and easier to have and express opinions these days, but for me this would be a way that I can actually take an active role.” She told the board she appreciates the district’s “strong history of being fiscally responsible,” and believes it’s headed in the right direction. It should continue to seek opportunities to increase enrollment and attract educators, Stevenson said. “I’m determined to leave my community better than I found it,” she said. According to Stevenson’s letter of interest, she owns the Portage Culver’s and was a middle school teacher from 2002-06 in the Baraboo School District and from 2008-11 in Portage. She listed Craig and Lea Culver, the restaurant chain founders, as references. Support Local Journalism Your membership makes our reporting possible. {{featured_button_text}} MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Easthampton Ranked Choice Voting AD HOC Committee 9/8/2021
youtube.com
Video
1:39:44
YouTube
Easthampton Media
BingVideo
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Costly runoff races won’t buy state ‘election integrity’
wyofile.com
Article
7892 chars
WyoFile
Kerry Drake
BingNews
Wyo GOP is committed to election reform — unless the ‘right’ candidates win without it, Drake opines.
What do the Wyoming Republican Party and Santa Claus have in common? They both keep lists of who’s been naughty or nice. State GOP Chairman Frank Eathorne recently told the Joint Corporations, Elections and Political Subdivisions Committee that he’ll be keeping a tally of where lawmakers fall on his party’s No. 1 priority — passing a runoff elections bill. “It’s not just a focus on the issue, it’s a focus on the questions we’re getting through the party channels: Which legislators and public elected officials are supporting and which are opposing [the bill],” Eathorne warned. “And we want to know, and we’re going to look at all the different methods of measuring and evaluating votes.” Was that a threat? Former Sen. Bruce Burns of Sheridan definitely thought so, and the 26-year Republican state lawmaker didn’t like it. “I get concerned when I see the chairman of the Republican Party sit up here and tell you that they’re going to see who’s for it and who’s against it,” Burns testified. “Any legislator who is craven enough to change their vote because of intimidation tactics doesn’t deserve to be re-elected.” When the panel met in June, it quickly said no to sponsoring a primary elections runoff bill. Instead, it advanced draft measures on ranked-choice voting and open primaries. Less than three months later, the committee completely reversed itself. The latter pair of ideas died last week, and a new runoff bill brought by freshman Rep. Chip Neiman (R-Hulett) was sent forward for consideration at its next meeting by a 7-6 vote. What led to this remarkable about-face? Perhaps some legislators were cowed by Eathorne’s testimony and a parade of other Republican state and county officials who cited “election integrity” as the reason they will accept nothing less than a runoff bill. Or maybe they just chalked all that bravado up to politics as usual and simply decided that it’s the best option for Wyoming voters. Whatever the reason, a few issues are worth exploring. Can the party’s officials make good on numerous promises over the past few years to silence and/or punish GOP lawmakers who won’t bend to their will? Is creating a runoff election system really the biggest concern for Republican voters in Wyoming? And, most importantly, did the committee err when it rejected open primaries and ranked-choice voting? Make no mistake: state GOP leaders have been motivated since their 2018 gubernatorial primary to never again let moderate politicians they denigrate as “RINOs” — Republicans in name only — defeat more conservative candidates. Then-State Treasurer Mark Gordon only received one-third of the 2018 vote, but won the primary and then the general election. Two conservatives, Foster Friess and Harriet Hageman, combined for 45% of the vote but lost. The party’s leadership, which has been taken over by the extreme right, seethed. Republican leaders charged that Democrats who changed their party affiliation to vote in the GOP primary “stole” the election for Gordon. They ignored official figures from the Secretary of State’s office that showed crossover voting was not enough to change the outcome. Eathorne made it clear to Republican lawmakers at the beginning of the 2019 session that ending crossover voting was No. 1 on the party’s legislative agenda. Sound familiar? It didn’t work. The Senate and House couldn’t agree on a crossover voting bill, and numerous attempts died. So much for the GOP’s top issue. Only one Republican legislator who voted against a crossover voting bill lost in the 2020 election. Former Sen. Michael Von Flatern of Gillette had long been dubbed a RINO for his moderate voting record. One seat does not a party retribution powerhouse make. While Eathorne claims his members have been clamoring for a runoff bill for the past decade, Rep. Shelly Duncan (R-Lingle) said only about one-third of her constituents told her they support one. Gail Symons, a Sheridan County Republican who writes a blog called Civics 307, said the facts don’t fit Eathorne’s narrative. While the party passed several resolutions since 2018 about the need for “election integrity,” Symons said, one calling for runoff elections wasn’t approved until this year. That coincides with the incident that set Republican leaders’ hair on fire: U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney’s vote to impeach former President Donald Trump. The possibility that Cheney could win the nomination for a fourth term in a crowded primary field started the runoff frenzy. Never mind that there was nary a peep out of the party when she won the 2016 primary with only 40% of the vote. Neiman’s initial bill would have required the top two candidates in any race where no one won at least 50% to face each other in a runoff election, beginning in 2022. County clerks and the Secretary of State’s office said because of mandatory legislative redistricting next year, a new system could not be implemented in that timeline. Neiman returned to the committee on Sept. 2 with a revised bill that won’t take effect until 2024. Lawmakers will have to consider whether it’s worth an extra $1.3 million per election to conduct runoffs. Is it good policy to spend that much money just to appease a political party that isn’t happy with the results under the current system? At that meeting, the committee tabled a bill to create an open primary system, which would eliminate the requirement for candidates to declare a party at the primary stage and ensure that the top two vote-getters advance to the general election regardless of party affiliation. If Wyoming Republicans truly want candidates who embody their political beliefs, why would a party that enjoys a 3-to-1 advantage in voter registration compared to Democrats say no to this system? I suspect it’s because officials are afraid too many “RINOs” would make it to the top two spots. Republicans also panned ranked-choice voting, which gives voters the option to rank candidates in order of preference. If no one wins a majority, it would trigger an “instant runoff” to determine the most popular candidate, who would advance to the general election. The beauty of ranked-choice voting is that it doesn’t require an extra election, which would save money. Unlike a runoff system, there would be no need to amend the Wyoming Constitution to implement it. There’s no guarantee that the committee will ultimately sponsor Neiman’s bill. Co-chairman Rep. Dan Zwonitzer (R-Cheyenne) broke a tie vote to bring it to the committee’s final pre-session meeting, even though he expressed reservations about whether the Wyoming GOP is truly committed to runoff elections. Zwonitzer noted the party made establishing a presidential primary its “No. 1 issue” five years ago, only to abandon the effort two years later when the Democrats got on board. “It’s difficult to hear this again, that ‘we’re fully behind this’ when it might fizzle in a year depending on the election [results],” he told Eathorne. He may as well have told Eathorne to drop the charade. We all know this bill has nothing to do with “election integrity” or the will of the electorate. If one of Cheney’s challengers beats her by a vote but is selected by only one-third of those who declare themselves Republicans that day, we’ll never hear a word about runoff elections or crossover voting again. Instead, a hearty “ho, ho, ho” will resound throughout the state, and GOP leaders will glow from all the election integrity they’ve given us. MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Chalupa Out Duels Field To Win Riverside Park Goat Of The Year
msn.com
Article
2469 chars
MSN
BingNews
Ranked-choice voting, attack ads, five weed-obsessed candidates, the race for the 2021 Riverside Park G.O.A.T. came down to the wire.
RIVERSIDE PARK, NY — In what some are calling the election of the year on the Upper West Side, Chalupa edged out Ms. Bo Peep and the rest of the Riverside Park goats on Tuesday in the race for 2021 G.O.A.T (Greatest Of All Time).© Photo courtesy of Anastasia Galkowski In photo (left to right): George Shea, Co-Founder of Major League Eating; Hannah Kirshenbaum, Conservancy Gardener; Dan Garodnick, Conservancy President & CEO; Linda Rosenthal, Assemblymember, NYS Assembly District 67.Five goats vyed for the position, campaigning for nearly two months on various platforms related to weeds, hard work, and park pride.A total of 24 goats scampered into Riverside Park on July 14, however, only five of the goats, the "Fabulous Five," stayed in the park between 120th and 125th Streets for the rest of the summer.Keeping up with the times, the Conservancy deployed a Ranked Choice Voting system to determine who would be crowned the winning goat.For any reader who might have forgotten the name of the five goat candidates and their corresponding party affiliations, here's a reminder.Skittles -- Eat Your Greens PartyMs. Bo Peep -- Hill Climbers for a Better New YorkBuckles -- Weed Whackers UnitedChalupa -- Grand Old Goat PartyMallomar -- Better Future for our KIDS PartyChalupa edged out Ms. Bo Peep by 65 votes in the final round.© Provided by Patch The ranked-choice results from the goat election. Photo courtesy of Anastasia Galkowski“It was a tight race, but New Yorkers clearly took a stand against negative campaigning, at least among goats,” said Dan Garodnick, Conservancy President & CEO, in a news release. “Today they recognized a true champion.”Garodnick's mention of "negative campaigning" is in reference to an unprecedented negative attack ad against the two frontrunners by Ms. Bo Peep. The negative ad, which accused Skittles and Chalupa of being in the pocket of Big Pesticide, clearly did help Ms. Bo Peep to an extent but wasn't enough to secure an election victory.© Provided by Patch Chalupa gets crowned as the winning 2021 G.O.A.T. Photo courtesy of Anastasia Galkowski MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 14, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Renewing Democracy Ranked Choice Voting and More video
youtube.com
Video
1:22:45
YouTube
Olli At Sedona Verde Valley
BingVideo
This program was jointly sponsored by League of Women Voters and OLLI Sedona Verde Valley at Yavapai College. To learn more about OLLI, go to www.yc.edu/OLLISedonaVerde Sedona Verde Valley OLLI Contact Us: OLLISV@yc.edu Call us 928.649.4275 To Register for OLLI courses, go to www.yc.edu/OLLISVRegister Renewing Democracy Ranked Choice Voting and ... MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021

 
 
 
0.7%
Podcast: Do California elections need Ranked Choice Voting?
thefulcrum.us
Article
448 chars
The Fulcrum
Our Staff
Newscatcher
In this edition of the Toppling the Duopoly podcast, host Shawn Griffiths is joined by Tom Charron, who represents a new group called the California RCV Coalition (Cal RCV). Charron explains why more California cities and the state as a whole need ranked choice voting for their elections and the benefits it would bring to bolstering representation across sociopolitical demographics. MORE→
Get some leverage. for The Fulcrum newsletter.
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Let's Go Through A Ranked Choice Voting Election! | TikTok Series | All 3 Parts
youtube.com
Video
0:08:08
YouTube
Sass
BingVideo
This is a series I made for my campaign TikTok where I go through a Ranked Choice Voting election to show what can happen. Part 1 of 3: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMRHvKK7e/ Part 2 of 3: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMRHvtuLB/ Part 3 of 3: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMR9k5JaN/ 0:00 Part 1: the Voters and the Candidates 2:17 Part 2: the Instant Runoff 5:07 Part ... MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%
Josh Knox
gazettenet.com
Article
1596 chars
Daily Hampshire Gazette
Newscatcher
Earlier this year, our city leaders petitioned the state Legislature to avoid holding a special election for mayor: a move that saved the city a good amount of hassle and expense. Holyoke could save even more money, and make our elections more fair,... MORE→
Earlier this year, our city leaders petitioned the state Legislature to avoid holding a special election for mayor: a move that saved the city a good amount of hassle and expense. Holyoke could save even more money, and make our elections more fair, by replacing our September preliminary and November general elections with a single ranked-choice voting election in November. Ranked-choice voting achieves more representative results than preliminaries, while saving us over $30,000 each election. Under ranked-choice voting, if your favorite candidate can’t win, your vote transfers to your second choice, and so on, until someone achieves a majority and wins. This means voters only attend one high-turnout general election and candidates need a majority of voter support to be elected. Both Easthampton and Amherst voters have adopted ranked-choice voting for their municipal elections, and it is used for political elections of some form or another in a majority of states. It’s time for Holyoke to adopt ranked-choice voting to save money and to give voters more voices, choices and reasons to turn out to vote in November. Learn more on Facebook and join our growing list of supporters: Holyoke for Ranked Choice Voting Josh Knox Rebecca Downing Libby Hernandez Aaron Vega Holyoke MORE→
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Clearwater council prepares to appoint new City Manager, talk 'ranked choice voting'
youtube.com
Video
0:01:55
YouTube
Wfla News Channel 8
BingVideo
Clearwater council prepares to appoint new City Manager, talk 'ranked choice voting'
> 4 weeks
Sep 13, 2021
Sign up to access NewsBuilt services © 2021 Verconian Solutions