demo
Sign in
Status Fit Image Title Source Summary Content Date

 
 
 
0%

1200x630
Consider ranked-choice voting
fredericknewspost.com
Article
383 chars
The Frederick News-Post
BingNews
In addition to coming up with new lines defining the state’s legislative districts, a commission created by Gov. Larry Hogan is also charged with another monumental task: Changing the way
We have used your information to see if you have a subscription with us, but did not find one. Please use the button below to verify an existing account or to purchase a new subscription.
> 1 week
Oct 6, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%

480x360
ANDREW YANG LEAVES DEMOCRATIC PARTY, THE PROBLEM WITH UBI AND MEDICARE FOR ALL
youtube.com
Video
0:06:09
YouTube
Mark Of The Beast
BingVideo
@107round Andrew Yang recently made it official, he has left the Democratic Party. His new Forward Party hopes to enact ranked choice voting. Here's the problem with UBI, Medicare For All, and Ranked Choice Voting #AndrewYang #UBI #M4A MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 6, 2021

 
 
 
0.6%
A Better Consensus: Why ranked-choice voting is awesome
tuftsdaily.com
Article
3795 chars
The Tufts Daily
Paloma Delgado
Newscatcher
Massachusetts rejected the idea a year ago, but we can set an example here in Medford and Somerville and in our own communities.
Flash forward to 2020, my own congressional district, Massachusetts’ 4th, had a nine-candidate Democratic primary. First place Jake Auchincloss beat second place Jesse Mermell, 22.4% to 21%, a margin of 2,145 votes in a race with over 157 thousands total . The other candidates had vote totals in the thousands, well over the 1.4% difference. These results are not representative, and in the case of Trump, these ‘plurality’ wins can be disastrous. How do we stop such close wins and candidates who thrive on a minority of the electorate? The answer is ranked-choice voting. It’s pretty simple : voters rank all the candidates in order of preference, and if no one gets more than 50% of the popular vote, the voters whose top choice did not win will see their votes transferred to their second-favorite candidates. This will continue until one candidate reaches more than 50%, which means that the candidate who wins will have the broadest consensus among the voters. The recent Democratic mayoral primaries for New York City used this system for the first time, where Eric Adams, the candidate with the broadest support, won with 50.4% of the vote versus second-place Kathryn Garcia’s 49.6%. In a field with 13 candidates, just counting the first-ranked votes, Adams had a first-place plurality with nearly 31% of the vote . However, that would’ve been disastrous for public trust if that was it. Ranked-choice voting made it clear that Adams was the consensus candidate. Now, I know that these are primaries and the system isn’t perfect. Parties’ leadership want maximum control over candidate selection, inactive ballots that don’t rank enough people down the ballot can throw off an election (New York City had a bit of that) and there are learning curves for election officials to adjust to the method (New York had some of this too). However, once more cities and states adopt the procedure, the kinks will be ironed out. Nearby Cambridge, Mass., and states like Alaska and Maine have adopted ranked-choice voting. Jared Golden won Maine’s 2nd Congressional District’s general election in 2018, but if not for ranked choice voting, minor candidates with a total of over 23,000 votes would have cost him the election by less than 1% of the vote, or roughly 2,000 votes. Courts then upheld ranked-choice voting after challenges from the losing incumbent. Ranked choice voting eliminates spoiler, minoritarian and populist candidates, as well as separate runoff elections (looking at you, Georgia), and it leads to fewer candidates attacking each other, since appealing to other candidates’ voters is the point. Massachusetts rejected the idea a year ago, but we can set an example here in Medford and Somerville and in our own communities. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 6, 2021

 
 
 
0%

480x360
Understanding Ranked-Choice Voting
youtube.com
Video
0:38:48
YouTube
Hinckley Institute Of Politics
BingVideo
This year, several municipalities across Utah will be implementing ranked-choice voting for the first time ever. In order to be a well-informed electorate, it is necessary to understand this election process when we go to vote on November 2nd. Join our panel as they discuss what ranked-choice voting is, how it works, its advantages and ... MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%

945x630
Early voting for November election begins today. Here's what you need to know.
msn.com
Article
6773 chars
MSN
BingNews
Tuesday, Oct. 5, is first day registered voters can cast a ballot in the 2021 local election.
LAS CRUCES - Tuesday, Oct. 5, is first day registered voters can cast a ballot in the 2021 local election.© Nathan J Fish/Sun-News Nikki Baca casts a ballot at Mayfield High School in Las Cruces on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020.First, if you're planning on voting for one of the many races for a local city council, school board, mayor or soil and water conservation board, you should check to make sure you're registered to vote.The regular deadline for online, mail, Motor Vehicle Division and third-party registration is Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. From Oct. 5 to Oct. 30, same day registration will be available in person at the county's nine early voting locations just prior to voting.Once you're registered, you can vote early, vote absentee or vote on Election Day, Nov. 2. See a list of who's running and what positions are up for election here.The Doña Ana County Government Center, located at 845 Motel Boulevard in Las Cruces, will serve as an early voting location from Oct. 5 through Oct. 29 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Oct. 30 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The center will be closed for Indigenous Peoples' Day on Oct. 11.Here's a list of the county's alternate early voting locations. These locations will be open to voters from Oct. 16 to Oct. 30, Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.Anthony City Hall Municipal Complex, 820 Highway 478, Anthony, NM.Doña Ana Community College-Sunland Park Center, 3365 McNutt Road, Sunland ParkDelores C. Wright Educational Center, 400 East Lisa Drive, ChaparralCorbett Center Student Union, New Mexico State University, 1600 International Mall, Las CrucesHatch High School, 170 East Herrera Road, HatchLas Cruces City Hall, 700 North Main Street, Las Cruces,Mesilla Town Hall, 2231 Avenida de Mesilla, MesillaSonoma Elementary School, 4201 Northrise Drive, Las CrucesHow to get an absentee ballot in Doña Ana CountyApplications for absentee ballots are available online at the New Mexico Secretary of State's website, for online submission or to be printed and filled out, or are available by contacting your local county clerk's office. Printed applications should be mailed or delivered to the county clerk's office at the county government center.Voters have until Oct. 28 at 5 p.m. to request one. People can vote absentee without an excuse in New Mexico.Absentee ballots will begin to be mailed to voters Oct. 5. Voters have until 7 p.m. on Election Day to return the ballots by mail or in-person to a polling place or the county clerk’s office.It's recommended that voters mail their absentee ballots by Oct. 26 so it's delivered on time. After that date, it's recommended to hand-deliver it.This election will be the second in which the City of Las Cruces uses ranked choice voting, in which voters are able to rank candidates in order of preference. Only the city council races for District 5 and District 3 will be ranked choice races, since they have more than two candidates.You can find information about registration, absentee ballots and important deadlines at dacelections.com or nmvote.org.Candidate profilesThe Sun-News has talked to Las Cruces City Council and Las Cruces Public Schools Board of Education candidates whose names will be on the ballot. Get to know who's running.City Council District 3Bev CourtneyBecki A. GrahamGregory Shervanick (write-in)City Council District 5City Council District 6William John BeermanYvonne M. FloresSchool Board District 1Abelardo BalcazarRaymond M. JaramilloSchool Board District 2Pamela M. CortHenry A. YoungSchool Board District 3Eloy Francisco Macha CambordaRobert C. WoffordMichael McDevitt is a city and county government reporter for the Sun-News. He can be reached at 575-202-3205, or @MikeMcDTweets on Twitter.This article originally appeared on Las Cruces Sun-News: Early voting for November election begins today. Here's what you need to know. Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article. Send MSN Feedback MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0%

800x450
Clearwater council hesitant to push ranked-choice voting
tampabay.com
Article
5136 chars
Tampa Bay Times
Tracey Mcmanus
Newscatcher
The council is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether to place a referendum on the March ballot for voters to decide whether to change the city’s election system.
CLEARWATER — The idea to ask residents whether they want to change the city’s election system started in April as a proposal by council member Hoyt Hamilton, but enthusiasm for the idea has waned. The council is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether to place a referendum on the March ballot asking residents about adopting a system where voters rank candidates in order of preference instead of picking one. Cities are not currently allowed to use ranked-choice voting because the Florida Secretary of State has not approved the system. If Clearwater voters were to pass the referendum, the city’s plurality system where the candidate with the most votes wins would remain in place until the state allows the practice. “Is this an exercise in futility at this point?” Hamilton asked at a Monday work session. “If it were a legal method, it’s better than what we have now,” Hamilton said. “But there’s so many hoops that have to be jumped through for this to become accepted.” The council voted 4-1 in June to direct city attorney Pam Akin to craft language for a March referendum question about ranked-choice voting. Council member Mark Bunker voted no. On Monday, as Akin presented the proposed ballot language, most council members expressed hesitancy. Mayor Frank Hibbard said he originally supported the referendum because ranked-choice voting appeared to be a compromise between the status quo and a runoff system, which is more costly for candidates. But Hibbard said after more research, he worries the Legislature could intervene to prevent ranked-choice voting. “I think even if we get standing and the voters of Clearwater pass ranked-choice voting and all the other tumblers fall into place, I question whether there wouldn’t be a statutory limit put on ranked-choice voting, so that is a concern to me,” Hibbard said. In 2007, Sarasota became the first city in Florida to adopt ranked-choice voting. But the city has been unable to implement it for 14 years because the state has not certified the software needed to operate the system. The Sarasota City Commission last month agreed to seek a court judgment on ranked-choice voting but later decided to pause and further examine the issue, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune reported. Under ranked-choice voting, now used in 22 jurisdictions across the U.S., if no candidate earns more than 50 percent, the person with the fewest votes is eliminated and that candidate’s ballots are redistributed to their voters’ second-choice candidates. The reallocation is continued until a candidate has a majority. On Monday, Akin said she believed it would take litigation from a party with legal standing, like Sarasota, to move ranked-choice voting forward. Hamilton said he believes a runoff system would be a better option, but he said it is unclear whether that would work. After 2022, the Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections would have to hold runoffs in the June following March city elections. Deputy Supervisor of Elections Dustin Chase told the Tampa Bay Times “it’s premature for us to discuss anything about a runoff election” because his office has not received any information from the city about a change. Clearwater’s plurality system has traditionally been uncomplicated as few candidates have run for office over the years. Hamilton raised the question of changing the election system in light of the crowded 2020 election where 13 candidates ran for three seats. Hamilton noted council member Mark Bunker won with 27 percent of the vote against four opponents under the plurality system that allows a candidate to win without a majority. Many expect another busy election in March, where two seats are up for grabs. But in the three weeks since candidates have been eligible to file paperwork to launch campaigns, there has been no flood of candidates. As of Monday, two have filed to run for Seat 5, which will be vacated by Hamilton due to term limits. They are Aaron Smith-Levin, an investment researcher and Church of Scientology defector, and Lina Teixeira, a community activist and fashion designer. Council member David Allbritton is so far running unopposed for a second term in Seat 4. Candidates have until Dec. 17 to file paperwork to run for the at-large seats. Council member Kathleen Beckman said if the 2020 candidate field was an anomaly, the city should have further discussion on how to motivate residents to run for office versus changing the election system. “We have much more of a problem with getting people to run,” Beckman said. “If at some point we want to have a real discussion about why that is, I think that’s an important discussion to have as well. For our democracy to work, we need people to run and we need diverse people to run: diverse in gender, age, personal experience, all that stuff.” MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%
Andrew Yang leaves Democratic party to become independent
staradvertiser.com
Article
2460 chars
staradvertiser.com
Bloomberg News
BingNews
Andrew Yang, who ran as a Democrat for both New York City mayor and in the party’s 2020 presidential primaries, said that he’s changed his voting registration to “independent.”
Andrew Yang, who ran as a Democrat for both New York City mayor and in the party’s 2020 presidential primaries, said that he’s changed his voting registration to “independent.” “I’ve been a Democrat my entire adult life,” Yang wrote in a statement posted on his website Monday. “And yet, I’m confident that no longer being a Democrat is the right thing.” He said he believes that registering as an independent would allow him to push for better reforms to the political system. Yang, a businessman, most recently mounted an unsuccessful campaign in the New York mayoral race, following his failed 2020 Democratic presidential primary run. “My goal is to do as much as I can to advance our society,” Yang wrote. “Many of the people I know are doing all of the good they can – but their impact is constrained. Now that I’m not a member of one party or another, I feel like I can be even more honest about both the system and the people in it.” Yang has long decried the two-party system and the polarization in the country. Throughout his 2020 presidential campaign, his slogan was “not left, not right, forward.” His presidential campaign introduced the idea of a universal basic income to a national audience through his proposed $1,000 monthly “Freedom Dividend” for all Americans. In the letter, Yang wrote the most important reforms “necessary to help unlock our system” is a combination of open primaries and ranked choice voting. New York City used a ranked choice voting system for the first time in the mayoral primaries Yang participated in before ultimately dropping out on election night. Yang’s latest book, “Forward: Notes on the Future of Our Democracy” will be published by Crown on Tuesday. Last month, Politico, quoting unnamed sources, reported that he was planning to establish a new political party, and that the announcement would coincide with the book’s publication. On Twitter, Yang defended himself against suggestions that his decision to change his party registration was connected to the release. “You know what I find odd – people accusing someone of making a decision like this out of opportunism while demonstrating that the opposite is probably true,” he wrote in a tweet. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0%

1200x754
8 Utah County cities preparing for ranked-choice voting ballots
heraldextra.com
Article
4723 chars
heraldextra.com
Newscatcher
As sure as summer turns to fall, so do the carefree days of summer turn to sign-packed corners, waving politicians and mail-in ballots. It’s election time. This year, eight cities in Utah County have chosen to opt in on the ranked-choice voting process; others are holding off to see how these cities do. Ballots will […] MORE→
Isaac Hale, Daily Herald file photo As sure as summer turns to fall, so do the carefree days of summer turn to sign-packed corners, waving politicians and mail-in ballots. It’s election time. This year, eight cities in Utah County have chosen to opt in on the ranked-choice voting process; others are holding off to see how these cities do. Ballots will be mailed Oct. 12 for this November’s election cycle. They must be postmarked by Nov. 1, the day before Election Day, to be counted. They can also be put in several drop boxes around the county up to the day of the election. For residents living in cities and towns that opted in to ranked-choice voting, there still might be some confusion as to how that works. Isaac Hale, Daily Herald file photo Ranked-choice voting allows voters to rank candidates they prefer from first to last. If no candidate gets more than half of the first place votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and those who ranked him/her first have their votes allotted to their second choice. The process recycles until a candidate has the majority of votes. Several cities have put videos on their websites to help explain the process. If a voter is still confused, they can visit rankthevoteutah.org to view a video on how the process works. There is also a question-and-answer section to provide additional information. Utah County cities and towns that have opted in for ranked-choice voting include Lehi, Springville, Woodland Hills, Goshen, Genola, Payson and Vineyard. They are among more than a dozen cities throughout Utah — including Salt Lake City, Draper and Sandy — that will use the process this year. Vineyard and Payson are not new to the process, and according to leadership in both cities, the process is not that bad. “In 2019, we surveyed voters who used ranked-choice voting. Over 84% of the respondents wanted to continue or expand that process,” said Josh Daniels, Utah County Clerk/Auditor. “They (Payson and Vineyard citizens) really liked it, and candidates seemed to like it too. That is why they are doing it again.” According to Daniels, the process won’t be that different from counting regular ballots. Utah County cities have all contracted with the county elections office to run the counting of the ballots; the only difference is that cities with ranked-choice voting have one more step. The ranked votes will be exported into a digital data file and the automated process will take about five minutes. Election officials take those results, tabulate the ranked-choice voting and turn it into a visual chart to show how the counting proceeded. That will be put on the county’s reader boards on election night, according to Daniels. Some cities pose interesting choices or no choices at all. For instance, in Elk Ridge, there are two seats open for city council and only two candidates; both win. However, in Lehi, there are nine council candidates with two four-year seats open. This is where ranked-choice voting could be advantageous. Springville’s city council also opted to use ranked-choice voting for the first time. There is no incumbent mayor, so voters will have three new faces to choose from. When it comes to city council seats, there are seven people running for two four-year seats and three running for one two-year seat. Hoping to get someone from the family in city leadership, there is a husband/wife team running. Ryan Miller is running for mayor and wife Amanda Miller is running for a four-year seat on the council. Brother and sister duo Marcia Conover-Harris and Craig Conover — retail manager for the Daily Herald — are running against each other for a chance at a four-year seat on the council. Pleasant Grove has one mayoral candidate and two city council candidates for the two seats open (one candidate pulled out of the race early on). Although they are not involved with ranked-choice voting, the primary decided the election and Pleasant Grove has cancelled its November election, according to the Utah County Elections Office. Over the next two weeks, several cities will hold meet-the-candidate nights or debates; check your city’s website for details. Newsletter MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%

480x360
164 | Andrew Yang: The Case for a New Party, Open Primaries, and Ranked Choice Voting
youtube.com
Video
0:58:25
YouTube
The Realignment
BingVideo
Andrew Yang, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and author of Forward: Notes on the Future of Our Democracy, joins The Realignment to discuss the Forward Party and why he thinks open party primaries and ranked choice voting are the keys to ending political gridlock in Washington. Subscribe to our Substack: https://therealignment.substack ... MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 5, 2021

 
 
 
0%

1120x630
Ranked-choice voting is worth a look
madison.com
Article
264 chars
madison.com
Barry Burden | Guest Column
ContextualWeb
"Instead of getting to pick just one candidate, a voter is allowed to rank all of the candidates on the ballot."
So much crazy is loose in the land — so much moon-howling madness — that it seems impossible to establish a hierarchy: Which view is more idio…
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%

1120x630
Opinion | Ranked-choice voting is worth a look
madison.com
Article
1407 chars
madison.com
Barry Burden | Guest Column
BingNews
"Instead of getting to pick just one candidate, a voter is allowed to rank all of the candidates on the ballot."
Ranking candidates might seem like a radical idea, but it’s already been used in many parts of the country. Cities such as Minneapolis and San Francisco have used it for years. It was also rolled out in several presidential primaries last year. Alaska and Maine are actually using it for statewide elections, including for president. In contrast to the current system where each voter picks just one candidate, ranking has the benefit of conveying more information about how voters see the entire field of candidates. In high profile elections such as those for Congress, ranking a few candidates will not be particularly difficult for most people to do. It might even encourage voters to learn more about all of the candidates rather than quickly latching on to one who is most acceptable. But the real benefits of RCV only materialize when there are more than two candidates running in the general election. Independent and minor party candidates are often discouraged from running because voters worry about “spoiling” the election or “wasting” their votes. RCV changes that. A voter can confidently rank all candidates without spoiling or wasting anything. If their top choice does not make the cut, their vote will automatically go to their second ranked candidate. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
1.5%
On ranked choice voting experiment in NYC mayoral primary (election ends June 22)
dagblog.com
Article
33901 chars
dagblog.com
Submitted By Artappraiser 1 Day Ago
ContextualWeb
This is pretty clearly a smart move for both Garcia and Yang. Also arguably a flaw in ranked choice voting that these sorts of strategic alliances can matter. https://t.co/SXZT5Gbygj
Add new comment 21750 reads Comments Although Yang and Garcia are *somewhat* ideologically compatible, this is likely much more of a tactical decision: RCV gives the 2nd, 3rd and 4th place candidates (Garcia, Yang, Wiley in some order) a lot of incentive to coordinate against the 1st place candidate (Adams). https://t.co/x8AIO8NT57 — Nate Silver (@NateSilver538) June 19, 2021 So it's still zero sum: Garcia and Yang are improving their chances by weakening Adams's and Wiley's. — Nate Silver (@NateSilver538) June 19, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Sat, 06/19/2021 - 4:16pm I think “BIPOC” or “URM” is how you’re supposed to execute the ~Asians don’t count~ move but part of Adams’ brand is he talks like a normal person. https://t.co/bfiJWbKH8z — Matthew Yglesias (@mattyglesias) June 19, 2021 For the record, if I lived in New York I would rank Garcia #1 because she seems like a competent person who will do a good job. Since I don’t, my main actual rooting interest in the election is that Adams winning is best for takes. Yang a solid #2 either way. — Matthew Yglesias (@mattyglesias) June 19, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Sat, 06/19/2021 - 4:19pm In San Francisco we also have politics without the benefit of party structures to organize the choice set, and a ranked choice voting system for several years. It has worked well. https://t.co/hIYS8kqYl5 — RonSupportsYou (@RonSupportsYou) June 19, 2021 In Montreal what they have are several city-specific political parties that are organized around local issues, separate from the provincial Québec parties which in turn are separate from the federal party. pic.twitter.com/bmlFTt7sk7 — Matthew Yglesias (@mattyglesias) June 19, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Sat, 06/19/2021 - 7:00pm BTW, Eric Adams did this just before Yang and Garcia ganged up; they are all playing hardball, as that particular shooting video was the "talk of the town": Eric Adams offers own cash reward in broad-daylight sidewalk shooting https://t.co/YTQTMkE95s via @MailOnline — Pavulous (@pavulous) June 20, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Sun, 06/20/2021 - 4:11pm A regular volunteer working for Eric Adams was stabbed in the deep South Bronx with, among other things, an ice pick. https://t.co/ZmD7Gt44XZ — Crime in NYC (@CrimeInNYC) June 20, 2021 The victim, 42, was stabbed four times and it was caught on video, police sources say. Taken to Lincoln Hospital, stable. https://t.co/HVPLvHE9vR — Myles N. Miller (@MylesMill) June 20, 2021 reply by artappraiser Adams’ camp ramping up the rhetoric on the Yang/Garcia coalition, talking about RCV manipulation, voter suppression, an attempt to disenfranchise Black voters and steal an election. @RepGregoryMeeks @rubendiazjr @ydanis @cmlauriecumbo https://t.co/HP7shVYi4S pic.twitter.com/YzCr3h3Uaa — Juan Manuel Benítez (@JuanMaBenitez) June 20, 2021 reply by artappraiser NEW: the NYC mayoral primary marks the end of an extraordinary chapter and the start of another, an inflection point that will play a defining role in shaping the post-pandemic future of NYC. Our Sunday story on how we got here and the fluid state of play https://t.co/Sf1okB7IiR — Katie Glueck (@katieglueck) June 20, 2021 This is Garcia’s advantage on the UWS and other high-info, highly educated areas. Does that translate citywide? https://t.co/Sf1okB7IiR pic.twitter.com/I3iXLuvvWD — Katie Glueck (@katieglueck) June 20, 2021 Adams faces mounting scrutiny;controversies could take toll in the homestretch. If he wins it will be in part because of significant institutional advantages — but also because his message connects at a visceral level in some neighborhoods across the city. https://t.co/Sf1okB7IiR pic.twitter.com/PUjKRy6V6z — Katie Glueck (@katieglueck) June 20, 2021 headed into Primary Day, Adams is considered a fragile front-runner, with Wiley&Garcia demonstrating late-breaking strength & Yang remaining a serious contender despite some signs of stalling momentum. but with RCV, race remains wildly unpredictable https://t.co/2y8fItt40Q — Katie Glueck (@katieglueck) June 20, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Sun, 06/20/2021 - 10:37pm ^ "UWS" stands for Upper West Side of Manhattan, that is stereotypically considered educated upper upper middle class lefty land, the socialists with mon-ay and prestige jobs (but definitely not Wall St., that's with the wealthy and repectable celebs across the park on the "UES", zip 10021. BTW, new techie weatlh is traditionally not there but "downtown" in one of the newest rich nabes in the country, Tribeca.) And all of these Manhattan people in numbers pale in a situation like voting, or you see them on teevee, because they are a small minority compared to the entire NYC population of teeming masses yearning to breathe free, as it were. reply by artappraiser on Sun, 06/20/2021 - 10:46pm I'm so glad Central Park functions as a multidimensional Mason-Dixon line of sorts... reply by PeraclesPlease on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 1:34am telling points from press conference this morning: Yang really bragging about this police captains union endorsement, "Eric Adams' old union." "Think about what that says about this person, their character," Yang says, referring to Adams — Ross Barkan (@RossBarkan) June 21, 2021 It's still striking Andrew Yang basically morphed into a quality-of-life candidate. Nothing in his stump speech about cash relief, the public bank — Ross Barkan (@RossBarkan) June 21, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 9:56am George Floyd's brother backs ex-cop Eric Adams for NYC mayor https://t.co/xKwMO3WG3t — Michael Moore (@mooreski42) June 16, 2021 reply by artappraiser Maya Wiley states that she still supports Ranked Choice voting after the Garcia/Yang teamup and Kathyrn Garcia thanks her for the stance: I want to thank Maya for standing up for Rank Choice Voting. Throughout this campaign she has never hesitated to fight for what she believes in. At every debate and every turn of this historic race it’s been an honor to share the stage with other strong women. https://t.co/GpZiBGQTbR — Kathryn Garcia (@KGforNYC) June 21, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 2:27pm Eric Adams, on the other hand, is doing the attack thing: One of the ugliest days-before-primary day in recent memory in NYC https://t.co/KcvJxcjRMu — Maggie Haberman (@maggieNYT) June 21, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 2:32pm and Yang on Adams today: “Imagine an administration that is led by someone who cuts corners and breaks rules and is constantly under investigation and then attacks whenever he’s criticized and then invokes race as the rationale for any criticism that’s directed toward him." https://t.co/hqWU3UzHAX — Emma G. Fitzsimmons (@emmagf) June 21, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 2:38pm The headline obscures the more interesting part of this piece: Gelinas argues that progressives should, at this point, hope a moderate wins and reduces crime, because when crime is high, the public focuses on it exclusively and has a lower appetite for progressive priorities. https://t.co/OU4VCnbNAu — Daniel Marans (@danielmarans) June 21, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 2:37pm Yang predicts Yang behavior: My unexamined, evidence-free priors tell me that Yang nosedived soon after apologizing for the Israel thing (suggesting inability to withstand heat from left activists) and may rebound because of homeless comments (suggesting no fear of heat from left activists) — Wesley Yang (@wesyang) June 21, 2021 Andrew Yang doubles down on his debate comments: "We all see these mentally ill people on our streets and subways, and you know who else sees them? Tourists. And then they don’t come back, and they tell their friends, ‘Don’t go to New York City.’” https://t.co/0rwphjOmix — Emma G. Fitzsimmons (@emmagf) June 21, 2021 I noticed the Wesley comment as soon as he made it and bookmarked it because there was just something about it that caught the way most NYC voters are. That they like someone feisty in executive positions who doesn't pander to the politically correct but like "tells it like it is." To outsiders, it's sort of related to what they might think of "New York rudeness" I think of all the mayors since Koch and bluntness like this is the one commonality. Even relatively soft-spoken Dinkins would strongly disagree in public at times, basically saying "but that's crazy" It doesn't even have to be a popular opinion (i.e. big gulp sodas and Bloomberg), the point is someone who is willing to put their foot down about something, not be wishy washy. In this case, I bet they did a quick overnight poll on it and found it went well with exactly the kind of voters he needs. Probably won't help Andrew enough but it's interesting that he's doubling down on it today rather than making excuses because there was lots of criticism. reply by artappraiser on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 6:51pm interesting: Maya Wiley criticized remarks from Eric Adams, a fellow candidate for New York City mayor, who baselessly claimed that an alliance between Kathryn Garcia and Andrew Yang amounted to voter suppression. “This partnership is not racist," she said. https://t.co/IkaFR8M2Bb — The New York Times (@nytimes) June 21, 2021 obviously going for the "I'm a uniter, not a divider" thing here: I got a really really really big team. A #1 vote for Maya Wiley is a vote for ALL of us. All of our coalition leaders, all of our communities, ALL of New York. Don’t take it from me - take it from them. pic.twitter.com/L7ih7Fetou — Maya Wiley (@mayawiley) June 22, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Tue, 06/22/2021 - 12:44pm another interesting-this highlights that there is always some tension between the yuppie influx (or in past times, hipster or hippie influx) from across the nation into Manhattan and fashionable parts of Brooklyn and the borough people who are the majority population and include most of the working class that actually runs the whole city including Manhattan. Adams clearly is representative of the latter. Guy from Illinois actually very astute, understood the situation, actually got the message as intended He wasn't from Iowa, the state @ericadamsfornyc had told gentrifiers to "go back" to, but one New Yorker By Choice, from Illinois, wanted to know: If Adams won, would he be his mayor too? From @JeffCMays , on top of all things Adams from Day One: https://t.co/tw12BfcZwD — Anne Barnard (@ABarnardNYT) June 22, 2021 which is basically: you may not know it, but you are the second class citizen here-the plumber from Queens that fixes your boiler in the winter so you have heat and the guy from Afghanistan who sells you your lunch from a food truck, and yes, the cops who police your subway and write parking tickets so that Manhattan can actually move and function, they are the first class citizens. We all pretend otherwise, but white-collar Manhattan could not exist without the borough people. It is not necessarily the future of the city, though! Could be just history! reply by artappraiser on Tue, 06/22/2021 - 6:42pm Very clear political battle lines tonight. Adams won Black and Hispanic voters in the outer boroughs. Wiley won Brooklyn/Queens hipsters. Garcia won Manhattan elites. And Yang won Asian and Orthodox Jewish/ethnic white areas of Brooklyn. Map by @cinyc9 . pic.twitter.com/nnY3Q2JE7l — Nathaniel Rakich (@baseballot) June 23, 2021 And here's why Garcia will make up ground with absentee ballots. The (affluent, white) areas that voted absentee in 2020 overlap neatly with her base areas tonight. https://t.co/8Wr2BLvjm9 pic.twitter.com/VDcYdhKtwy — Nathaniel Rakich (@baseballot) June 23, 2021 There are maps of who came in 2nd and 3rd place in 1st preferences buried under Menu-->Mayor D-->More-->2nd/3rd. I'm too busy updating the map to take a photo, but Wiley came in 2nd in 1sts in a lot of places, while 3rd is more mixed. Assuming I didn't mess up a formula. — cinyc (@cinyc9) June 23, 2021 @CurrentCitizen are the White ethnic areas Italian and the Asian areas Chinese? — Nemets (@Peter_Nimitz) June 23, 2021 Flushing in Queens is incredibly Chinese; while I believe the ethnic white areas in Brooklyn are more Russian/Polish. Italians more prevalent around Staten Island and Nassau — Publey (@PubleyPolitics) June 23, 2021 What is what?!?!?! Can someone post an actual link to this picture? — Dr. Gustav Sundell (@gsundell) June 23, 2021 https://t.co/JmV8Sy9R3v — cinyc (@cinyc9) June 23, 2021 I assume Adams is blue, Wiley is pink, Garcia is yellow, and Yang is orange? — Phillip Wu (@phillip_wu) June 23, 2021 Correct. Stringer is light blue, but he didn't win much. — cinyc (@cinyc9) June 23, 2021 I'll take credit for this map, unlike the @CNalysis one. How close are we to done counting for the night? Unfortunately, the live map doesn't totally update itself. There are a few manual steps that require I don't go to bed quite yet. — cinyc (@cinyc9) June 23, 2021 (replies to above not posted) Current NYC Mayor results (738k votes counted): Adams 31.05% Wiley 21.98% Garcia 20.05% Yang 11.68% Based on turnout estimates ( @PredictIt currently estimates about 900k), it seems >50% of the remaining votes may be absentees - these could give Garcia a limited boost. — Ryan Matsumoto (@ryanmatsumoto1) June 23, 2021 There's been a limited number of polls with an Adams vs. Wiley final round matchup, but they actually have *Adams* gaining an average of 4 points vs. the first round. Data for Progress: Adams +5 -> Adams +8 Citizen Data: Adams +14 -> Adams +12 Emerson: Adams +6 -> Adams +18 — Ryan Matsumoto (@ryanmatsumoto1) June 23, 2021 With a first-past-the-post primary and the current results (Adams 31% Wiley 22% Garcia 20%), we might have gotten hot takes about how Adams only won because Wiley/Garcia split the vote. But with ranked choice voting, we can see what actually happens in a head-to-head matchup! — Ryan Matsumoto (@ryanmatsumoto1) June 23, 2021 I think what we'll find is that 'lanes theory' only goes so far in explaining voter preferences in multi-candidate primaries. Yes, there will be overlap between the Garcia/Wiley camps. But a substantial number of voters will be Garcia > Adams > Wiley or Wiley > Adams > Garcia. — Ryan Matsumoto (@ryanmatsumoto1) June 23, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 12:58am can't find any truth to the rumor that Andrew Yang's campaign paid this lady to be a victim, it just really happened: A tourist from Colombia describes being attacked on a Queens-bound E train Monday evening. https://t.co/5cocGJVA5M — Crime in NYC (@CrimeInNYC) June 22, 2021 Psst.: Flyover might not like tourists but NYC actually funds itself with them. Rudeness is part of the local culture to explore but bashing with bottles by mentally ill roaming allover the city is a step too far over the line. reply by artappraiser on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 2:42am The homeless have taken their toll on San Francisco too, and to a lesser extent LA. reply by PeraclesPlease on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 3:47am H/t to @DataProgress for getting both mayor & comptroller races right: Adams leads for NYC mayor, Wiley, Garcia battle for second in last-minute poll https://t.co/fKTor3o3yl via @nypost — Michael Benjamin (@SquarePegDem) June 23, 2021 here's my stereotypical generalizations after looking at all of this stuff: Adams is an anti-elite populist appealing to the borough people In that mode he could actually get quite a few Republican votes as well, like from whites on Staten Island. Wiley is now labeled The Woke candidate whether she intended to do that or not, that's where she is now. AOC's endorsement solidified that, she appeals to the stereotypical UWS lefty and Brooklyn hipsters and lefty activisits. Garcia is actually the competent manager ala Bloomberg and appeals to the rational Democrats of wealthy districts including the UES and rational educated elite people who live in lefty elite areas but are not fans of woke But if Adams does too much populist pandering with outrageous comments on any matter, he will look less and less like someone who can actually govern this mess of a city and more like Trump, and he will start losing support. He has to look like a moderate grownup dad from now on. If he stumbles on that, his more moderate voters would go to Garcia and his more left voters would go to Wiley. reply by artappraiser on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 1:34pm p.,s. interesting wild card not enough pundits are discussing: Curtis Sliwa, founder of the Guardian Angels, and long time talk show host, famous as an anti-crime activist, is going to be the Republican candidate. He probably knows Adams demographic better than Adams does, he is of them, he has always spoken for them, he talks working class patois. He is both far more populist and knows better how to rile and at the same time is even far less competent to run a huge business like NYC. Sliwa is like the extremist version of Adams, and possibly also will be seen as far more understanding of working class p.o.c. But someone like Garcia could easily make him look like an idiot who had reached way beyond his competence level. I honestly don't know if Adams could, haven't seen enough of him doing the serious manager thing, don't know much about his record handling practical things as Brooklyn boro pres. https://www.fox5ny.com/news/primary-day-2021-curtis-sliwa-wins-republican-mayoral-primary edit to add:complicating things Sliwa has a "sensitive socially liberal" side (similar to what Guiliani used to have), caring about individuals, the proper role of macho male as protector thing-he has always genuinely been like that, is why he founded "The Guardian Angels." Example now is, I saw the other day he just announced support for a no kill law in NYC for shelter animals. reply by artappraiser on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 1:58pm p.p.s. I see Curtis' tweet today is railing against the big bureaucracy, public and private, and that is no minor complaint when it comes to any NYC voter: My campaign for #NYCMayor is one for ALL New Yorkers Eliminate property tax loopholes for wealthy corp’s (MSG) & universities (Columbia & NYU) Restore public safety Create a Right to Business program so ALL people can get into business Fund students, not bureaucracy — Curtis Sliwa for NYC Mayor (@CurtisSliwa) June 23, 2021 edit to add these replies so far are quite telling: Fund Tenants. Not NYCHA. — Josh Eisen (@JoshEisen17) June 23, 2021 (NYCHA is the hopelessly messed up NYC public housing system) and this is a winner for sure, any animal lover or pet owner cares more about them than people: And “No Kill Animal Shelters”........correct? — Ed (@ETK276) June 23, 2021 and just a high five, people do think of him that way, as just another guy, approachable: you got this Curtis!!! — elite (@elite65736152) June 23, 2021 reply by artappraiser on Wed, 06/23/2021 - 2:21pm things are working out differently way on the other side of the state in Buffalo: India Walton, a socialist candidate, is poised to beat Buffalo’s incumbent Democratic mayor. The primary upset would upend the political landscape in New York’s second-biggest city and make her its first female mayor. https://t.co/93GVsmdH8r — The New York Times (@nytimes) June 23, 2021 I note from the article Mr. Brown, 62, did not campaign vigorously, according to his opponents, and he refused to debate Ms. Walton. He has appeared regularly with Mr. Cuomo at the governor’s news conferences in Western New York to promote the state’s economic reopening. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
2.4%

1270x665
How-to: ranked choice voting
cottonwoodheightsjournal.com
Article
6409 chars
cottonwoodheightsjournal.com
ContextualWeb
Ballots for the Municipal Election on Nov. 2 will look slightly different for residents as Cottonwood Heights will be utilizing Ranked Choice Voting this year.
By Cassie Goff | [email protected] The 2021 Municipal Election will be significant for the City of Cottonwood Heights. As mentioned in this edition of the City Journals, three out of the five seats for city council are up for election with none of the currently serving elected officials opting to run for re-election. This year, Cottonwood Heights residents will elect a new mayor, a new city councilmember for District 3, and a new city councilmember for District 4. Ranked Choice Voting will be used to tally up the residential votes for these races. Instead of voting for one candidate per race as residents have previously been accustomed to, voters will be able to rank candidates based on preference. The Cottonwood Heights City Council voted to approve the use of Ranked Choice Voting on May 4. Ballots will appear slightly different for voters using Ranked Choice Voting. Voters will be able to fill in their candidate preferences for each race based on a table. Candidate names will be listed in the left-hand column (or the y-axis). Preference based on numerical ordering will be listed across the top of the table (or the x-axis). Voters will be asked to fill in a bubble for each column. The most preferred candidate for a specific race should be bubbled in within the first column labeled “First Choice.” Then, the second choice candidate should be bubbled in within the second column, and so on. For voters, Salt Lake County recommends not ranking a candidate more than once. In other words, listing one candidate for first, second, and third choice will not benefit the candidate in any way. It is also not recommended to give a candidate the same ranking. However, voters can choose to rank as many of the candidates as they would like. Any of the remaining “choice” columns can be left blank, if preferred. “Voters have more of a voice,” said Cottonwood Heights City Recorder Paula Melgar in May. “Preferences are counted for second and third choice. That vote doesn’t just go away.” Instead of a single-choice, winner-takes-all voting system, Ranked Choice Voting allows for a different methodology to be used when tabulating votes. Each voter's first preference for candidate is recorded initially. If a single candidate receives over 50% of the vote, they are announced as the winner. If there is not a clear majority vote, counting moves to phase two. If no one candidate receives over 50% of the vote after the first initial count, the candidate with the least amount of votes is eliminated from the race. Then, the ballots of the voters who ranked the (now eliminated) candidate as their first choice are revisited to count their second choice for preferred candidate. After those votes are redistributed based on second preference, the candidate with over 50% of the vote wins. If there is not a clear majority again, phasing continues until there is. An example is detailed below. Along with Cottonwood Heights, a handful of various municipal elections have opted to utilize Ranked Choice Voting this year. Bluffdale, Draper, Riverton, Midvale, Millcreek, Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Sandy, and Magna Metro Township will all be counting votes based on preference. To learn more about Ranked Choice Voting in Utah, visit the Utah County Elections Division ( www.ssl.utahcounty.gov ) or Utah Ranked Choice Voting’s website ( www.utahrcv.com ). For more information about voting in Salt Lake County, visit the Salt Lake County Clerk’s informational page through www.slco.org/elections/ranked-choice-voting. Additional information from Cottonwood Heights can be accessed by visiting www.cottonwoodheights.utah.gov , hovering over the “Your Government” tab across the top, navigating to the “Public Records and Notices” column and clicking on “Ranked Choice Voting .” Ranked Choice Voting Example As an example, say there are five candidates running for mayor: Watermelon, Orange, Blueberry, Kiwi, and Grape. One hundred votes were cast from residents. Watermelon received 23 votes, Orange received 24 votes, Blueberry received 12 votes, Kiwi received nine votes, and Grape received 32 votes. Since nobody received over 50% of the vote in that first count, the candidate with the fewest number of votes (Kiwi) is eliminated. Those nine ballots that originally opted Kiwi as their first choice will now be revisited to count their second preference. Out of those nine voters, four marked Orange as their second preference and five marked Grape as their second preference. Those votes are then redistributed, so Watermelon now has 23 votes, Orange has 28 votes, Blueberry has 12 votes, and Grape has 37 votes. There is still no majority vote, even after phase two of counting. Again the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, so Blueberry is dropped from the race. The 12 ballots marking Blueberry as first preference are revisited to account for the voter’s second preference. Out of those 12 voters, two marked Orange as their second preference and 10 marked Grape. Those votes are redistributed, so now Watermelon has 23 votes, Orange has 30 votes, and Grape has 47 votes. What a close race! With still no clear winner, the 23 ballots with Watermelon marked as first preference are revisited as they are now eliminated. Out of those 23, 10 marked either Kiwi or Blueberry as their second preference, so the third preference is counted instead. Out of those 10, five marked Orange as their third preference and five marked Grape as their third preference. Those are added to the counts for Orange and Grape. The other 13 ballots have Grape marked as their second preference, which leaves Orange with 35 votes and Grape with 65 votes. Finally, a winner! MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0.4%

480x360
Easthampton Ranked Choice Voting Committee 9/30/2021
youtube.com
Video
1:15:57
YouTube
Easthampton Media
BingVideo
Easthampton, MA Ranked Choice Voting Committee meeting held on 9/30/2021.
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0%

1200x1200
Clearwater council hesitant to push ranked-choice voting
news.yahoo.com
Article
5374 chars
@YahooNews
Tracey Mcmanus, Tampa Bay Times
Newscatcher
CLEARWATER — The idea to ask residents whether they want to change the city’s election system started in April as a proposal by council member Hoyt Hamilton, but enthusiasm for the idea has waned. The council is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether to place a referendum on the March ballot asking residents about adopting a system where voters rank candidates in order of preference instead of ... MORE→
CLEARWATER — The idea to ask residents whether they want to change the city’s election system started in April as a proposal by council member Hoyt Hamilton, but enthusiasm for the idea has waned. The council is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether to place a referendum on the March ballot asking residents about adopting a system where voters rank candidates in order of preference instead of picking one. Cities are not currently allowed to use ranked-choice voting because the Florida Secretary of State has not approved the system. If Clearwater voters were to pass the referendum, the city’s plurality system where the candidate with the most votes wins would remain in place until the state allows the practice. “Is this an exercise in futility at this point?” Hamilton asked at a Monday work session. “If it were a legal method, it’s better than what we have now,” Hamilton said. “But there’s so many hoops that have to be jumped through for this to become accepted.” The council voted 4-1 in June to direct city attorney Pam Akin to craft language for a March referendum question about ranked-choice voting. Council member Mark Bunker voted no. On Monday, as Akin presented the proposed ballot language, most council members expressed hesitancy. Mayor Frank Hibbard said he originally supported the referendum because ranked-choice voting appeared to be a compromise between the status quo and a runoff system, which is more costly for candidates. But Hibbard said after more research, he worries the Legislature could intervene to prevent ranked-choice voting. “I think even if we get standing and the voters of Clearwater pass ranked-choice voting and all the other tumblers fall into place, I question whether there wouldn’t be a statutory limit put on ranked-choice voting, so that is a concern to me,” Hibbard said. In 2007, Sarasota became the first city in Florida to adopt ranked-choice voting. But the city has been unable to implement it for 14 years because the state has not certified the software needed to operate the system. The Sarasota City Commission last month agreed to seek a court judgment on ranked-choice voting but later decided to pause and further examine the issue, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune reported. Under ranked-choice voting, now used in 22 jurisdictions across the U.S., if no candidate earns more than 50 percent, the person with the fewest votes is eliminated and that candidate’s ballots are redistributed to their voters’ second-choice candidates. The reallocation is continued until a candidate has a majority. On Monday, Akin said she believed it would take litigation from a party with legal standing, like Sarasota, to move ranked-choice voting forward. Hamilton said he believes a runoff system would be a better option, but he said it is unclear whether that would work. After 2022, the Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections would have to hold runoffs in the June following March city elections. Deputy Supervisor of Elections Dustin Chase told the Tampa Bay Times “it’s premature for us to discuss anything about a runoff election” because his office has not received any information from the city about a change. Clearwater’s plurality system has traditionally been uncomplicated as few candidates have run for office over the years. Hamilton raised the question of changing the election system in light of the crowded 2020 election where 13 candidates ran for three seats. Hamilton noted council member Mark Bunker won with 27 percent of the vote against four opponents under the plurality system that allows a candidate to win without a majority. Many expect another busy election in March, where two seats are up for grabs. But in the three weeks since candidates have been eligible to file paperwork to launch campaigns, there has been no flood of candidates. As of Monday, two have filed to run for Seat 5, which will be vacated by Hamilton due to term limits. They are Aaron Smith-Levin, an investment researcher and Church of Scientology defector, and Lina Teixeira, a community activist and fashion designer. Council member David Allbritton is so far running unopposed for a second term in Seat 4. Candidates have until Dec. 17 to file paperwork to run for the at-large seats. Council member Kathleen Beckman said if the 2020 candidate field was an anomaly, the city should have further discussion on how to motivate residents to run for office versus changing the election system. “We have much more of a problem with getting people to run,” Beckman said. “If at some point we want to have a real discussion about why that is, I think that’s an important discussion to have as well. For our democracy to work, we need people to run and we need diverse people to run: diverse in gender, age, personal experience, all that stuff.” MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0.2%

1280x720
Ballot Blunders: NYC Board of Elections dismisses help with ranked-choice count
ny1.com
Article
7577 chars
ny1.com
Courtney Gross
BingNews
This is part one of our investigative series into the BOE.
Laura Mueller-Soppart is a politically active Brooklynite — and voting, to her, is very important. "Being able to vote was that one moment where you could say, 'I am going to the polls. I am making my voice heard,’” she told NY1 while strolling through her Brooklyn neighborhood. “And to have that taken away, it shocked me. It's not what I expected to happen." But it did in June of 2020. Like thousands of other New Yorkers, Mueller-Soppart requested an absentee ballot. She was in Chicago at the time and wanted it sent there. She got the application in just in time. But that ballot arrived 10 days after the election. She couldn't vote. "Democracy already felt like it was in a precarious place for the past five years for someone with my politics, living in this neighborhood,” she said. "And to not be able to have any say in what direction that was going to go in in that moment felt incredibly undemocratic and un-American." Mueller-Soppart is one of thousands of New Yorkers who have had trouble casting their ballots over the years. And even when some are able to vote, problems can still persist. Those problems even emerged for Dante de Blasio, Mayor Bill de Blasio's son. "I would later find out, my ballot got leaked,” the younger de Blasio told NY1 outside of the Metropolitan Museum of Art recently. “Or it's available publicly because the Board of Elections does not maintain the secrecy of every ballot that's cast in New York City." A report from Princeton University last month found voting data released by the Board of Elections in August did not effectively shield the ballots of 378 voters who happen to be the only people voting in their election district. It meant anyone could know who Dante de Blasio voted for. "It was shocking,” Dante de Blasio told NY1. “It was disturbing to know that something I took for granted, that my ballot would be secret, is now public information and I don't see any compelling reason that the Board of Elections should be releasing information of me and 370 other people just so anyone can look." That’s two separate blunders, and, we know, there are many more. Nearly every year for the past six years, the Board of Elections has faced scandal or controversy, some of them directly linked to the board’s mismanagement and lack of oversight. NY1 has spent months interviewing employees, new and old, stakeholders and elected officials on the state of our city's election administration, finding a series of missteps and mismanagement — for years. In 2016, New York voters discovered the board illegally purged about 117,000 voters off the rolls in Brooklyn. In 2018, long lines and clogged machines led to massive chaos at the polls. The board's leader initially attributed it to the weather. Soon after, NY1 revealed the board’s leader was getting all-expense-paid trips across the country by a major contractor. He was later fined by the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board . In 2020, the board admitted thousands of absentee ballots didn’t get to voters on time. And even after that, more than 83,000 absentee ballots that were returned were invalidated — tossed out for technical errors (technicalities the board says are dictated by state election law). Ultimately, the board confirmed about 20% of absentee ballots weren't counted. Which brings us to June 29, 2021 . For the first time the board would reveal unofficial election results from a new system of ranked-choice voting. But it quickly became clear those numbers were wrong. It would be seven hours after the actual release of results before the Board of Elections admitted what happened — 135,000 dummy ballots, which were used to test the system, were not cleared before the board started tabulating the vote. So the unofficial results were wrong. “It was caught literally within minutes,” said Michael Ryan, the executive director of the Board of Elections. “Unfortunately, the fix, the undo wasn't so easy to rectify with speed. It was easy enough to rectify in reality, but not in terms of the impatience of the public to get the information, and rightfully so.” Board officials say it was a simple mistake. But NY1 has learned those officials failed to accept assistance that could have averted the crisis. We sat down with Caleb Kleppner of MK Elections. Kleppner is a subcontractor with the Ranked Choice Voting Resource Center — the company that created the tabulation software. They had offered to assist the board with the tabulation. But, Kleppner says, the board was not responsive. "What happened was they installed the software and saw that it was working, and then they didn't really listen to our advice on how to use it and how to display the results,” said Kleppner. “And in particular they didn't accept our offer to do a parallel tabulation of the results to double check their work before they released it to the public." “It was actually kind of frustrating to have a contract with the city to provide services and for them not to avail themselves of our services," he added. Emails exclusively obtained through the freedom of information law by NY1 confirm the center reached out multiple times to offer support over the course of six months. Board officials say it was not a training issue, but human error. At the time, the board’s executive director, Michael Ryan, was on medical leave. He just returned last month. Its administrative manager, Pam Perkins, had just retired. She wasn’t there either. The board's deputy executive director and its operations manager were running the show. Sources at the board tell NY1 there was a divide among leadership on how quickly the ranked-choice results should even be released. Ultimately, the board sacrificed accuracy for speed. “There was a demand for transparency. And there was a demand for speed,” Ryan told NY1. “I have always said, and you've heard me say this, we will never sacrifice accuracy for speed. That seems to have happened here, which now causes us to go back and say, 'OK, how did this happen? And how do we fix it.'" The error occurred in the Queens office. Sources at the board told tell NY1 many employees there were overwhelmed and overworked. One longtime employee at the office did not follow the procedures laid out. She has since retired. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0%

1920x1008
Andrew Yang Quits Democratic Party in Favor of Being Independent
bloombergquint.com
Article
375 chars
BloombergQuint
Emma Kinery
BingNews
Andrew Yang Quits Democratic Party in Favor of Being Independent
“My goal is to do as much as I can to advance our society,” Yang wrote. “Many of the people I know are doing all of the good they can – but their impact is constrained. Now that I’m not a member of one party or another, I feel like I can be even more honest about both the system and the people in it.” MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
0.6%

1280x937
Andrew Yang leaves Democratic Party
kron4.com
Article
2136 chars
KRON4
Fareeha Rehman
ContextualWeb
SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Andrew Yang, who ran for president of the United States as a Democrat in 2020, said he’s left the blue party. Yang wrote a blog on Monday revealing his ‘bre…
SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Andrew Yang, who ran for president of the United States as a Democrat in 2020, said he’s left the blue party. Yang wrote aon Monday revealing his ‘break up’ with the Democratic Party. He’s now registered to vote as an Independent. He called it a ‘no-brainer’ to register as a Dem over 25 years ago, while he was a student at a liberal college and living in New York City, where he recently lost the bid for mayor. “I’ve been a Democrat my entire adult life. And yet, I’m confident that no longer being a Democrat is the right thing.” Andrew Yang, blog, Oct. 4, 2021 Yang calls this change a step towards fixing ‘our system’ and advocates for having Open Primaries and Ranked Choice Voting. An Open Primary is when a voter can vote in any primary election without declaring a party affiliation. The voter can not vote in more than one party’s primary, according to Fairvote . In Ranked Choice Voting, voters make a mark for each candidate – ranking them in order of preference, rather than strictly choosing one candidate, according to Fairvote . You still note your #1 pick, but also your #2, #3, and so on. “I’m actually more comfortable trying to fix the system than being a part of it,” said Yang. During his campaign experiences, Yang wrote that he has seen politicians ‘publicly eviscerate’ each other and then act friendly behind the scenes. “A lot of it is theatre,” he said. Yang has only run for two official U.S. seats – suspending his presidential campaign in 2020 and later losing the New York City Democratic primary in June 2021. Prior to that, he was a lawyer and also worked in startups, founding the nonprofit organization Venture for America. MORE→
> 1 week
Oct 4, 2021

 
 
 
4.3%
Ranked Choice Voting Will Improve Hawaii's Elections
civilbeat.org
Article
8990 chars
Honolulu Civil Beat
Editorial Board
BingNews
The process allows candidates favored most by a majority of voters to win political races. The Legislature should move forward with one of the bills it allowed to languish last session.
But Democrats Colleen Hanabusa and Ed Case received nearly 31% and 28% of the special election vote, respectively, demonstrating that a solid majority of voters in Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District preferred a Democrat over a Republican. Indeed, Hanabusa easily won the Democratic primary that September for a new two-year term — Case dropped out of the running and endorsed Hanabusa — and she defeated Rep. Djou that November by 6 percentage points. It was not a fluke. Hanabusa also beat Djou in a 2012 rematch by nearly 10 percentage points. Djou never made it back to Congress, losing to Democrat Mark Takai in 2014. If Hawaii had had in place ranked choice voting, it’s quite possible that Hanabusa or Case would have won the 2010 special election, keeping the seat in the hands of Democrats. Since 1971, Democrats had won the seat 17 times compared to just twice for Republicans. Put another way, Hawaii’s election system did not serve the interests of a majority of voters in 2010. But if the Hawaii Legislature passes and the Hawaii governor signs into law ranked choice voting for special federal elections — but also special elections for vacant county seats and statewide races for governor and lieutenant governor — our elected leaders would more equitably reflect the desires of the electorate. A Majority Winner Ranked choice voting, sometimes referred to as instant runoff voting (or RCV and IRV, for shorthand), gives voters the option to choose candidates for office by order of preference. The ballot asks voters to rank the candidates — first, second, third and so forth — and the candidate with the majority of first choices wins. If a candidate wins with 50% of the vote, there is no need for the ranking system to kick in. The results would be just like they are in any other single-choice election. But if there is no majority winner, as is often the case when multiple candidates vie for the same office, the race is determined by an “instant runoff” — that is, as soon as the ballots can be tabulated. As the nonpartisan FairVote explains it, “The candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated , and voters who picked that candidate as ‘number 1’ will have their votes count for their next choice. This process continues until there’s a majority winner or a candidate won with more than half of the vote.” FairVote says RCV promotes majority rule : “Voters can honestly rank the candidate they like most, without fear that doing so will help the candidate they like least. With greater choice, voters have more power.” Sound radical? Not at all. The nonpartisan National Conference of State Legislatures points out that RCV has a 100-year history in the United States, with several cities adopting it in the 1920s and 1930s. As of 2020, more than a dozen cities used RCV including Minneapolis and St. Paul in Minnesota, and San Francisco and Oakland in California. In July, Eric Adams won the Democratic primary for mayor of New York City, where voters ranked up to five candidates in order of preference. Tabulation errors on the part of city officials delayed the results but did not impact the final result. It is worth noting that Adams, who now faces a Republican candidate in the general election in November, is Black while the three runners-up included two women — one of them Black — and an Asian male. FairVote cites a study of California’s Bay Area that found people of color hold office at a higher rate under RCV. The group’s California chapter says it has also resulted in greater diversity among elected officials, including women. And there are a number of indications that turnout also increases with RCV. In addition to greater gender and ethnic diversity, NCSL says the voting system also limits the “spoiler” effect of independent or minor-party candidates in plurality elections. “With ranked-choice voting, voters can select their first choice from a minority party, and a candidate from one of the two major parties as their second choice. If no candidate receives 50% of the first-choice selections, the voter’s second choice — a Democrat or a Republican — would get the vote.” RCV Comes To Hawaii Last year, Maine became the first state to use RCV in a general presidential election through a citizens’ initiative. That same year Alaska enacted RCV via a ballot measure, too, says NCSL. And FairVote says that a dozen states use or have enacted RCV in local elections, including California, Oregon, New York and Florida. Even Hawaii has begun to use RCV, although in a limited fashion. Last year, we become one of four states to use RCV in a presidential primary. Joe Biden defeated Bernie Sanders in ranked choice voting in the mail-in election run by the Democratic Party of Hawaii, with the final vote tally listing Elizabeth Warren third, Tulsi Gabbard fourth and six other Democrats on the ballot. If Hawaii were to adopt RCV, the Legislature is the place to do it. Fortunately, bills have been considered by our lawmakers, including in the since completed 2021 session. Those bills carryover to the next session that begins in January. One measure would establish ranked choice voting for all partisan primary elections , special elections and nonpartisan general elections held in the state. Another measure would provide RCV for special federal elections and special elections of vacant county council seats. That latter bill, Senate Bill 560, managed to make it through before dying in the waning days of session. But it is technically still alive and can be brought up again next year. There is bound to be resistance to changing the way we vote. But change can happen. Hawaii successfully moved to all mail-in voting in 2020 after several years of failed attempts. The result was the highest turnout since 1994. The Legislature built on that success by approving a law this year to improve mail-in balloting, in part by requiring the state Office of Elections and the country clerks to decide whether they need more voter service centers. Another new law makes an application for voter registration automatically part of all state identification card and driver’s license applications. Interested in making ranked choice voting a permanent part of our electoral system? Contact your legislator now. MORE→
2 weeks
Oct 3, 2021

 
 
 
0%
POINT-COUNTERPOINT: Ranked-choice voting in Massachusetts
telegram.com
Article
1072 chars
Telegram & Gazette
Telegram & Gazette
ContextualWeb
Monthly opinion piece featuring pundits Randy Feldman and Roberta Schaefer
Telegram & GazettePoint/Counterpoint, a monthly feature on the Opinion page, is an exercise in civic engagement.This month we asked our columnists to weigh in on ranked-choice voting, one of the questions on the Nov. 3 ballot.Under a ranked-choice voting system, voters can choose to numerically order candidates according to their preference.RANDY FELDMAN: Vote yes on Question 2. America needs to change way it elects politiciansROBERTA SCHAEFER: Vote no on Question 2. Ranked-choice voting is the wrong choice MORE→
2 weeks
Oct 3, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Letter: Ranked-choice voting having an influence
hometownsource.com
Article
190 chars
Sun Current
Mike Hanks Community Editor
Newscatcher
We’re happy to report that the majority of folks we spoke with at doors and events understand RCV and are looking forward to using it.
While we are involved in a lot of volunteer activities, we are especially inspired and excited about the positive impact RCV can have on our city and its residents. We’re hopeful that this new way of campaigning and voting will help bring civility back to politics. RCV promotes campaigning that is more respectful, issue-based and inclusive. Already, we’re seeing candidates highlight their agreements with other candidates instead of mudslinging. We see yard signs for multiple candidates in the same yard. We’re happy to report that the majority of folks we spoke with at doors and events understand RCV and are looking forward to using it. Lynn LundebergPat MeyerBloomington, MN MORE→
2 weeks
Oct 3, 2021

 
 
 
0.6%
Many reasons to choose ranked choice voting over runoff elections
wyomingnews.com
Article
180 chars
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Letter From Lois Petersen | Buffalo
Newscatcher
Wyoming voters want elections that assure the winning candidate ascends to office with at least 51% of the votes. Two ways to accomplish this are through ranked choice voting (RCV)
> 2 weeks
Oct 2, 2021

 
 
 
1.9%
Is it time for Clearwater to change its election system?
msn.com
Article
5823 chars
MSN
BingNews
Earlier this year, most Clearwater City Council members said they want to ask residents in a referendum whether the city should transform its elections. Under the current plurality system, the candidate with the most votes in a race wins. That can result in officials being elected without a majority, like how council member Mark Bunker beat four opponents last year for Seat 2 with 27 percent ... MORE→
Earlier this year, most Clearwater City Council members said they want to ask residents in a referendum whether the city should transform its elections.© Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times/Times Randy McKinney, of Clearwater, holds "I Voted" stickers moments after casting his ballot at the Supervisor of Elections Office at the Pinellas County Courthouse, 315 Court St., during early voting on Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, in Clearwater. Early voting is available in Pinellas County, October 19 through November 1, 2020 from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., daily.Under the current plurality system, the candidate with the most votes in a race wins. That can result in officials being elected without a majority, like how council member Mark Bunker beat four opponents last year for Seat 2 with 27 percent of the ballots cast.Council member Hoyt Hamilton noted Bunker’s margin when he raised the need for a change to a majority system earlier this year. At the time, the council did not have an appetite to create runoffs like Tampa, which requires the top two vote-getters in a race without a majority winner to square off in a general election, a more expensive endeavor for candidates and cities.“I still believe runoffs are the right thing,” Hamilton said in an interview. “It costs more money, but guess what? If you’re going play, these are the rules. I think every election should show a clear winner.”At its work session Monday, the City Council is scheduled to discuss another option: whether to place a referendum on the March ballot asking residents about adopting a system where voters rank candidates in order of preference instead of picking one.Under ranked choice voting, now used in 22 jurisdictions across the U.S., if no candidate earns more than 50 percent, the person with the fewest votes is eliminated and that candidate’s ballots are redistributed to their voters’ second-choice candidates. The reallocation is continued until a candidate has a majority.Before Clearwater could use such a system, however, it would need to be certified by the state.Secretary of State Laurel Lee has said that state law doesn’t allow ranked choice voting because candidates are required to receive the highest number of votes cast in a general or special election in order to win, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. The nonprofit Rank My Vote Florida has argued that prohibition does not apply to municipal elections.In 2007, Sarasota became the first city in Florida to adopt ranked choice voting. But the city has been unable to implement it for 14 years because the state has not certified the software needed to operate the system.The Sarasota City Commission this month agreed to seek a court judgment on ranked choice voting but later decided to pause that endeavor while it further examines the issue, the Herald-Tribune reported.Along with the 22 jurisdictions with ranked choice voting in place, another 28 are projected to use the system in their next election or the following one, according to advocacy group FairVote.“This is the fastest growing election reform in the country right now,” senior research analyst Deb Otis said. “We elect leaders that aren’t necessarily the choice of the majority of the voters. We need a system that incentivizes candidates to engage with the broadest base of voters, not just one base.”During a presentation to the council in April on various election systems, Scott Paine, director of leadership development and education for the Florida League of Cities, said ranked choice voting eliminates the need for a runoff election. However, he said there may not be enough data yet to confirm it gets rid of negative campaigning.If Florida certifies the process, there would be some further local steps. Municipalities contract with the Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections to conduct city elections using county equipment and expertise.If ranked choice voting is cleared by the state, Pinellas County would not be required by law to automatically accommodate the software, said Dustin Chase, deputy supervisor of elections.“We haven’t explored the possibility of using our current Election Systems & Software equipment in this manner, because it is not certified for this use in the State of Florida,” Chase said.On Wednesday, Beth Rawlins, a Clearwater-based political consultant, wrote an email to the city suggesting ranked choice voting is a better alternative to Clearwater’s plurality system because “its methodology does produce an eventual winner with some level of support from more than 50 percent of the electorate.”But since the system is not permitted in Florida, Rawlins said the city should provide a solution in the meantime.Rawlins urged the council to pose two referendum questions to voters in March: one asking whether to adopt ranked choice voting when it is certified by the state and a second for a two-election system until then.If no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote during the regular March elections, the top two vote-getters should appear on a ballot in June, Rawlins said.Rawlins estimated that holding this June runoff would cost the city about $130,000 every two years.“I think that’s money well spent to preserve representative government,” Rawlins wrote. MORE→
> 2 weeks
Oct 2, 2021

 
 
 
0%
Andrew Yang: NYC’s mayoral primary system doesn’t represent real NYers
nypost.com
Article
4424 chars
nypost.com
Andrew Yang
BingNews
If you’re reading this, chances are you weren’t able to vote for me on primary day, even if you wanted to..
Hello New York — it’s Andrew Yang. You remember me — I ran for mayor earlier this year and got over 115,000 votes in the Democratic primary, more if you count second-place or third-place votes in the new ranked-choice system. If you’re reading this, however, chances are you weren’t able to vote for me on primary day, even if you wanted to. Why? Because if you’re reading The Post (love the Sports section), you probably are an independent or Republican, and not a registered Democrat. In New York, as in most places, our primary elections are closed. I can’t tell you how many people came up to me on the street during the mayoral campaign and said, “Yang! I’m supporting you because I’m with the firefighters” or something to that effect, only to find that they couldn’t vote for me. That’s because if you were already a registered voter, you would have had to switch your registration to Democrat by Feb. 15, a full four months before the primary. Most people weren’t paying attention to the race back then. This leaves independents and Republicans out in the cold. Yes, now you have a general election in November to look forward to with Curtis Sliwa as the Republican candidate, Raja Flores the independent, Stacey Prussman as the Libertarian and others, but we all know that they face long odds against Eric Adams given the massive registration advantage that Democrats enjoy in NYC. This also means that the next mayor often gets determined with only about 5 percent of New Yorkers ever voting for that person — only 11 percent of all New Yorkers voted in the Democratic primary in June. This is why Democratic primary candidates are forced into a position where they must appeal and seek the blessing of a tiny slice of New Yorkers who are eligible to vote on primary day, including special interest groups whose priorities sometimes do not align with the vast majority of New Yorkers. Even many reasonable Democrats, I believe, would agree that this system isn’t representative and needs reform. So what am I recommending? Instead of having closed party primaries that leave a lot of people out in the cold, important elections like the mayoral election should have an open primary — with all candidates — and then have the five finalists compete via ranked-choice voting in the general election. As I write in my new book “ Forward: Notes on the Future of Our Democracy ,” such a change wouldn’t be particularly revolutionary — a growing number of states and local jurisdictions have adopted open primaries in recent years. At least one political party uses open primaries for congressional and state-level offices in 21 states, according to Ballotpedia, running the political spectrum from Alabama to Virginia, Montana to Vermont. This has been extended to presidential primaries, as well. California, Washington state, Nebraska and Alaska also have variations of open primary systems for different offices. Now, even if New York adopted an open primary system for the mayoral election, the Democrat would still have an advantage because they’d still have the most registered voters. But candidates would have to listen to New Yorkers of every perspective, because every vote would matter. You’d have different coalitions get built up. Turnout would go up because politics would seem like less of an insiders’ game. And people could show up to vote in both the primary and the general regardless of party affiliation. I ran a small business in New York — like many of you — and I know that real competition is a good thing. Having a closed party primary shuts out a lot of perspectives. Open primaries would make a lot more New Yorkers feel like they have a say in the leadership of the city. How could that be a bad thing? Andrew Yang was a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and a 2021 candidate for mayor of New York City. Named by President Obama as a Presidential Ambassador of Global Entrepreneurship, he is the founder of Humanity Forward and Venture for America. MORE→
> 2 weeks
Oct 2, 2021

 
 
 
0%
More than 2,800 have voted early so far in Minneapolis' municipal elections
msn.com
Article
2941 chars
MSN
BingNews
City election officials on Friday reported a large number of residents taking advantage of early voting for the Nov. 2 municipal elections. The city recorded 2,827 ballots cast in the first 10 days of early voting, a running tally that the officials described as "a high number." By comparison, the municipal elections in 2017 had slightly fewer early ballots cast, 2,641, after the first 10 ... MORE→
City election officials on Friday reported a large number of residents taking advantage of early voting for the Nov. 2 municipal elections.The city recorded 2,827 ballots cast in the first 10 days of early voting, a running tally that the officials described as "a high number."By comparison, the municipal elections in 2017 had slightly fewer early ballots cast, 2,641, after the first 10 days.The 2020 general election drew 5,373 early voters in the first 10 days. However, that number not only was fueled by a presidential contest but by residents choosing to be cautious amid a pandemic and not get in lines or congregate closely in voting venues all across the city on Election Day.Of the 2021 total over the first 10 days, 2,376 were cast in person, 448 by mail and three by other methods. More than 8,000 mail-in ballots have been sent to Minneapolis voters this election year.Interest in this off-year election appears to be high, particularly in the wake of heated debate over the role of policing in the city and Mayor Jacob Frey being up for re-election for the first time since the death of George Floyd and the sometimes violent civil unrest that followed.There are two City Charter amendment ballot questions being put up for consideration. One is whether to replace the Police Department with a Department of Public Safety that would combine public safety functions through a comprehensive public health approach to be determined by the mayor and the City Council.The other proposes designating the mayor as the city's "chief executive" who must "direct and supervise" most city departments. It describes the City Council as the "legislative body."Minneapolis residents this fall are using ranked-choice voting to choose three preferences each for mayor and members of the City Council, Board of Estimate and Taxation, and Park and Recreation Board.Early voting continues and can be done in person at 980 E. Hennepin Av., Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., with extended hours including weekends in the final days before Election Day. Visit vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/vote-early-in-person for complete hours and more information.To vote early by mail, voters can request an absentee ballot. Visit vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/vote-by-mail for an absentee ballot application.Paul Walsh • 612-673-4482 MORE→
> 2 weeks
Oct 1, 2021
Sign up to access NewsBuilt services © 2021 Verconian Solutions