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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
news.yahoo.com
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2659 chars
news.yahoo.com
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Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine's first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, MORE→
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Oct 16, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting advocate in 1st legislative term resigns Maine House seat
bangordailynews.com
Article
1969 chars
Bangor Daily News
Michael Shepherd
ContextualWeb
Rep. Kyle Bailey is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system.
AUGUSTA, Maine — Freshman state Rep. Kyle Bailey of Gorham resigned his seat Friday, with fellow Democrats tapping a former state senator to run to replace him in a special election expected after Nov. 2. Bailey, who is mostly known in state politics for running the 2016 referendum campaign that enshrined Maine’s first-in-the-nation ranked-choice voting system, said he was leaving the seat “due to an exciting professional opportunity that has arisen recently.” He easily won the 2020 race to succeed his husband, former Rep. Andrew McLean, D-Gorham, in a solidly Democratic district covering parts of Gorham and Scarborough. Similarly, McLean left his seat ahead of last year’s election to take a job after graduating from law school. Former state Sen. Jim Boyle, D-Gorham, who briefly ran for governor in the 2018 Democratic primary will run for the seat in a special election, the House Democratic campaign arm announced in a Friday statement. Party nominees for the seat must be picked at a local caucus after the secretary of state’s office announces the special election. The Legislature is not expected to return to Augusta in 2021, so Bailey’s resignation will have no short-term effect on House business. After he leaves, the chamber will have 79 Democrats, 65 Republicans, four independents and one Libertarian. Another open seat in Augusta will be filled after a November race between Democrat Raegan LaRochelle and Republican James Orr. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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Easthampton to hold ranked-choice voting info sessions
gazettenet.com
Article
2536 chars
Daily Hampshire Gazette
Brian Steele
Newscatcher
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election.The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on... MORE→
EASTHAMPTON — Voters will have two chances this month to learn about ranked-choice voting and how to fill out the ballot in the upcoming city election. The Easthampton Senior Center, 19 Union St., is hosting ranked-choice voting information sessions on Thursday, Oct. 21, at 11 a.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 6 p.m. Ray Spaulding, treasurer of the Friends of the Easthampton Council on Aging, said each of the masked indoor gatherings can accommodate 23 people plus the two presenters who will explain the voting process. Those who wish to attend must make a reservation by calling (413) 527-6151, ext. 0. The Nov. 2 election will be the first time in the city’s history that ranked-choice voting is used, following the approval of a ballot question in 2019. Voters will be asked to give each candidate a rank — 1, 2, 3, etc. — and winners are determined after multiple rounds of counting voters’ preferences. Ranked-choice is only used in races with one seat, such as the mayor’s race, and not for positions like City Council at-large in which multiple winners are declared. There are three candidates for mayor on the ballot – Eric Berzins, incumbent Nicole LaChapelle, and Keith Routhier — and a fourth, Donald Torrey, has launched a write-in campaign. Since there is only one City Council seat per ward, the winner will be chosen by ranked-choice voting, but because every incumbent is running for reelection unopposed, the rankings are unlikely to become a factor in determining the winners this year. “Really, ranked-choice voting doesn’t play into that race this year because there’s no competition for the seats,” Spaulding, an election worker for the past 10 years, said. Voters are not required to rank every candidate. “Whoever they want to vote for, if they don’t want to use ranked-choice voting, they put number one,” Spaulding said. All precincts will vote at Easthampton High School, 70 Williston Ave. Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Voters can request a mail-in ballot by downloading and submitting a form on the Secretary of State’s office or by calling the city clerk’s office at 413-529-1400, ext. 460. Brian Steele can be reached at bsteele@gazettenet.com. MORE→
2 days
Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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ASCSU pass ranked-choice voting resolution ratifies members The Rocky Mountain
collegian.com
Article
4624 chars
collegian.com
News
ContextualWeb
The Associated Students of Colorado State University swore in two new senators, ratified new members to SFRB and passed Resolution 5102 and Bill 5103.
You are here: / / Campus / ASCSU pass ranked-choice voting resolution, ratifies members ASCSU pass ranked-choice voting resolution, ratifies members By Piper Russell Campus , The Associated Students of Colorado State University convened Oct. 13 for their seventh meeting of the semester. ASCSU swore in two new senators, ratified new members to the Student Fee Review Board and the Board For Student Organization Funding and passed Resolution 5102 and Bill 5103. ASCSU swore in Noah Burge as a senator for the College of Business and Walter Tulis as a senator for the Student Disability Center. Director of Off-Campus Life Lindsay Mason also received the Mark S. Denke Service Award, which is given annually through ASCSU. Hannah Taylor, the former ASCSU president, said the award recognizes those in advisory positions who are “not only dedicated leaders themselves but they are ones that contribute to the growth of others.” “During my time working with Lindsay (Mason), I found that she is the type of adviser that will support you through giving you guidance, resources and opportunities for collaboration, who will also empower students to take the lead,” Taylor said. “Lindsay is an advisor that genuinely cares about student’s input being taken seriously.” ASCSU also held elections for SFRB. One of the candidates, Stephen Laffey, is a first-year student studying economics, part of the dean’s leadership council for the College of Liberal Arts, a senator for the College of Liberal Arts and serves on the 4-H Leadership program for the county. “I really hope to … gain experience and help provide a means for our constituents, our peers really, to be represented in how their fees are allocated,” Laffey said. “And I really relish that opportunity to grow in service, providing CSU students with that pathway to representation.” Uriel Diaz, the other candidate for the SFRB, is a third-year student studying psychology with minors in Spanish and business. He is also the accountant for ASCSU and works with El Centro and Rams Against Hunger on campus. “I just want to get a more general knowledge on the whole process on where our student fees go, … and that way I can help others be heard and not just ASCSU members,” Diaz said. Both candidates were unanimously ratified and sworn in. ASCSU also approved candidates to BSOF. According to the Office of Finance’s website , BSOF allocates a portion of the ASCSU student fee to student organizations for programming as well as fundraising for student organizations. Candidates included Nicholas DeSalvo, Grace Newman, Jillian Cook, Sydney Ziegler, Senator Samantha May, Senator Brandon Baum, Recruitment and Retention Officer Ben Torres Doxey, Speaker Kyle Hill and Women’s Caucus Chair Treasure Morgan. “Whether I agree with the organization’s purpose or not, it’s about what they’re doing, the event they’re putting on and where that money is going,” DeSalvo said. “With that in mind, I think it’ll be a lot easier for me to be fair and equitable to each organization requesting funding.” All candidates were unanimously approved. Later, ASCSU voted on Resolution 5102, “Endorsement of Ranked Choice Voting.” The resolution, which passed with 19 votes, was to show that ASCSU approves of implementing a ranked choice voting process for executive elections. According to the resolution, ASCSU will move forward with enacting ranked choice voting before March 2022 by working with Attica Voting developers and CSU Tech staff to create a functional platform . ASCSU also voted on Bill 5103, “Maximizing ASCSU’s Potential with the Business and Non-Profit Community.” This bill seeks to add a new position, ASCSU business and community liaison, to the executive job descriptions. The bill passed unanimously with 23 votes. Piper Russell can be reached at or on Twitter @PiperRussell10 . MORE→
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Oct 15, 2021

 
 
 
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What is Ranked Choice Voting?
youtube.com
Video
0:00:28
YouTube
Voter Choice Arizona
BingVideo
Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) is a small change to the way we vote that produces big improvements to the election process. On the ballot you rank candidates in the order you prefer (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). If your first-choice candidate does not receive enough votes, your vote counts towards your second choice and so on, until a candidate has a ... MORE→
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Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Westbrook voters to decide on local ranked-choice balloting
pressherald.com
Article
5764 chars
Press Herald
Chance Viles
Newscatcher
Westbrook city officials have worked closely with Portland on the plan, which voters will weigh-in on in at the polls this November.
Westbrook voters will weigh-in next month on implementing ranked-choice voting for local elections. City Clerk Angela Holmes worked closely with Portland officials to put a proposal before voters tailored to Westbrook’s needs, according to Portland City Clerk Kathy Jones. “P ortland and the state helped us figure out how we wanted our language to look if voters wanted to adopt it,” Holmes said. If approved at the polls Nov. 2, ranked-choice voting would be used in the mayor’s race and to elect city councilors and other local elected officials when there are three or more candidates for a seat and no candidate has won more than 50% of the vote. Under the system, voters have the option of ranking the candidates in the order they prefer. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the popular vote, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and that candidate’s supporters’ second choices are then counted. The process continues until one candidate receives more than 50%. Jones said she and Holmes worked to avoid instances in Westbrook where someone with a small number of votes wins a seat over someone well in the lead, as was the case during a Portland Charter Commission election in June. In that election, a candidate who received only 4% of the vote heading into the ranked-choice runoffs ended up defeating a candidate who had the second-highest number of votes out of the 21 candidates in the initial count. Jones said Holmes knew that to stave off any problems, she should include a provision to use proportional ranked-choice voting when there are multiple candidates in one race – as Portland residents had to do in the charter commission election. In proportional ranked-choice voting, a candidate wins when they hit a certain threshold of votes, 50% plus one. “The problems the state and P ortland went through, they’ve figured out the best way to handle things, which is great, and we get the benefits and their knowledge,” Holmes said. The City Council voted unanimously Aug. 3 to put the referendum on the ballot, with Councilors Gary Rairdon and Elliot Storey absent. Previously, Rairdon and Storey had been critical of municipal ranked-choice voting, with Rairdon saying he preferred a “one-vote” system. Jones said the most important piece in executing ranked-choice voting is voter education, to avoid any confusion. Portland residents who spoke with the American Journal Tuesday said they did not feel confused by ranked-choice voting and, if anything, they said it had little impact on their voting experience. “For me, I think it is good and useful, but I didn’t think it changed much and I didn’t really notice any difference,” Katie Greene said. Christopher Moore said local ranked-choice voting was “a major win for democracy and representation.” “I don’t think the criticism that it is too confusing is necessarily true … or a legitimate reason to preclude a vote-counting method that promotes proportional representation, provides the voter with greater democratic choice and elevates candidates who would otherwise be marginalized,” Moore said. Jeff Rommel disagreed. While he supports the idea of ranked-choice voting, he said overall it doesn’t fit with municipal elections because most residents don’t put enough research into a spate of candidates. Their votes outside of the main candidate they support are guesswork, he said. “People aren’t willing to do their research and there isn’t enough thought on that,” Rommel said. “It is confusing and doesn’t seem right here.” Former Portland Mayor Ethan Strimling said even having lost the 2019 mayoral race to Kate Snyder, when ranked-choice voting was in play, he sees only benefits from it. Snyder garnered 39% of the votes in the first round, while Thibodeau and Strimling followed with 28% and 25%, respectively. Travis Curran fell behind with 7%. “Ranked-choice voting in P ortland has made our democracy more reflective of the role of the people,” Strimling said. In Portland, Strimling said, the number of progressive candidates elected to the Charter Commission reflects Portland voters. “ Our council has been, I believe, out of touch with where the regular everyday majority of P ortland voters stand, and since ranked-choice voting has been put into place, we now have broader representation in terms of diversity and more reflective of the (people’s) values,” he said. According to Holmes, data going back to 2013 shows that ranked-choice voting would have been used, if available, in four Westbrook races: for Ward 4 councilor in 2013, mayor in 2016 and 2019 and councilor at-large in 2019. Jones thinks ranked-choice voting is a good fit for any municipality that wants to implement it, but there is a cost. The current price of ranked-choice voting software, which is the same software used by the state and Portland, would add $25,000-$30,000 to the city’s costs per election, Holmes has said previously, including the contract company’s fees for tallying the ranked-choice votes. Even if ranked-choice voting does not come into play in a particular election, Jones said, the contractor must prepare for it beforehand and dedicate staff on Election Day in case it is needed. Westbrook voters were in favor of using ranked-choice voting in federal and state elections during Maine’s 2016 referendum, 5,657 to 3,958. All residents will vote Nov. 2. at the Community Center gym at 426 Bridge St. MORE→
3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked Choice Voting Ice Cream Toppings
youtube.com
Video
0:02:21
YouTube
Rank The Vote Ohio
BingVideo
Rank the Vote Ohio had a House Party to give a small group of Ohioans an experience of Ranked Choice Voting. See their reactions as they vote for ice cream toppings.
3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked choice voting explained
cdapress.com
Article
5055 chars
Coeur d'Alene Press
None
Newscatcher
A bill recently introduced by U.S. Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Angus King (I-Maine) and Rep. Dean Phillips (D-Minn.) supports an intriguing trend in how we vote.
A bill recently introduced by U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Angus King (I-Maine) and Rep. Dean Phillips (D-Minn.) supports an intriguing trend in how we vote. The Voter Choice Act would provide financial support to local and state governments which transition to a ranked choice voting (RCV) model (the 2020 version of the bill didn’t gain momentum). In ranked choice voting, voters get second and third choices, not just a top pick. So if their favorite doesn’t get a total majority, their second choice still counts. Right now, most elections use a plurality, most-votes-wins system, whether or not that represents a majority of voters. Used for years by military personnel from seven states living overseas, ranked choice voting isn’t new. Some U.S. cities used RCV in the 1920s and ‘30s but discontinued a few decades later because counting them by hand was too cumbersome. Now with technology aiding that process, it’s seeing a quiet revival. According to the bill sponsors, jurisdictions and parties in 29 states have already adopted some form of RCV. Maine and Alaska use RCV for statewide and presidential elections. Hawaii, Kansas, Nevada and Wyoming did for their 2020 presidential primaries; and California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah and Vermont for local elections. The nations of Ireland (both), Australia, Malta, New Zealand and Scotland have adopted it. How it works. If a candidate gets 50 percent plus one after all first-choice votes are counted, that candidate wins. If no one gets a majority, the person with the fewest first-choice votes is eliminated, and that candidate's voters' second choices get bumped up to the top spot for the next count. This reallocation goes on until someone reaches 50 percent plus one. Pros. Proponents say RCV ensures the winner represents a majority vote. Consider the 2016 presidential election, when neither Mr. Trump nor Ms. Clinton earned a majority vote. The usual system of "most votes wins" can make someone with only a plurality, not necessarily the person with majority support, the winner. That’s been especially evident considering the electoral system, where the popular and electoral choices don’t necessarily match; we’ve had more than one president whose opponent actually got more votes. Proponents and some elections experts also say it encourages more moderate candidates, that extreme-view candidates would have a harder time getting through primaries because a broader appeal nets more second choice votes. RCV may also cut down costs by eliminating the need for run-off elections, already built into the process. Perhaps the most appealing benefit proponents offer is less negative campaigning, as candidates will need a majority of voters on their side, and mud-slinging has been shown to turn off voters. Democratically speaking, RCV’s biggest argument is that it gives voters more power. No longer would they have to consider viability of candidates, holding their noses to vote for someone they like less simply because the favorite seems less likely to win (or risk vote-splitting). In the ranking system, such dilemmas are solvable by listing more than one choice. Of course, opponents disagree, saying it’s not the one person, one vote system it was intended to be. Cons. Opponents say RCV is too complicated, and complications can lead to confusion or voter mistakes. That can lead to ballots not being counted if voters don’t know how to fill them out properly, at least during the learning curve of transitions. Another con is that it could lead to deal-making between candidates, encouraging voters to vote for someone as No. 2. In New York’s June mayoral election, such an alliance was openly campaigned, with mixed reactions. Opponents also say it wouldn’t necessarily reduce negative campaigning. Much of that is done by outside groups who support a candidate, and RCV wouldn’t change that. Ranked choice voting would also mean voters would need to do more of what we all should be doing anyway — be more informed about all the candidates. It’s (probably) constitutional. In 2018, Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-Maine) challenged the constitutionality of Maine’s ranked-choice voting system in federal court, and lost. The U.S. District Court judge ruled the U.S. Constitution allows states autonomy in choosing how to run elections. The National Conference of State Legislatures has a brief on this topic at Bit.ly/3lnCkXi . • • • Sholeh Patrick is a columnist for the Hagadone News Network. Email Sholeh@cdapress.com. MORE→
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Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Guest column: In support of Ranked Choice Voting
broomfieldenterprise.com
Article
4023 chars
Broomfield Enterprise
Special To The Enterprise
Newscatcher
By Laurie Anderson Broomfield City Council This November, Broomfield voters will decide if the City and County of Broomfield will adopt Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) as the voting method used to elect…
By Laurie Anderson Broomfield City Council This November, Broomfield voters will decide if the City and County of Broomfield will adopt Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) as the voting method used to elect councilmembers and the mayor in future races. As a member of the Broomfield City Council, I support the measure and urge voters to vote “yes” on Ballot Question 2A. This initiative was referred to the ballot unanimously by the City Council after several study sessions and consideration of its benefits. It’s important to note that RCV is a voting method that the Colorado State Assembly supported in 2021 by passing HB21-1071 which puts in place the rules, guidance, certification and auditing of RCV single-winner voting in nonpartisan county-coordinated elections. With this in place, Broomfield is ready for a method of voting that produces more representative outcomes. Looking back at Broomfield’s past elections since 2007, there were 12 races with three or more candidates, but only four of those candidates won the majority of the vote. In eight of those races, the winner didn’t carry the majority. Under our current system of “first-past-the-post” voting, a majority is not required only a plurality. Thus, candidates can win with 35% or 40% of the vote, or even less, when there are more than two candidates in the race. By using RCV, we can ensure the winner reflects the majority of the voters. RCV is an instant multiple-round system that produces a majority preference winner based upon the initial ballot. When there are more than two candidates, voters indicate their first choice preference, as well as their preferences for second choice, third choice, and, potentially, more depending on the number of candidates in the race. When the ballots are tallied, if a candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, he or she is declared the winner. However, if no candidate has the majority of first-choice votes, the candidate with the fewest first-choice votes is eliminated and the second-choice preference on those ballots is then lifted. A new tally is conducted to determine if any candidate now has a majority of the votes. If not, the process continues until a candidate ultimately has the majority. There are many times in life when we do not get our first choice, and would prefer to make a second choice. As a simple example, if I want chocolate fudge ice cream and the store is sold out, I would choose a backup, such as plain chocolate over vanilla. Our elections are so much more important than this simple example. We should acknowledge Broomfield is seeing races with three or four candidates. When this happens, if two of the candidates have similar views on high-priority issues, they can split the vote of like-minded supporters and the non-majoritarian candidate can win. RCV will change this. This benefits the voter, not any specific party, and voters can vote their conscience without worrying about having to strategize to avoid contributing to spoiling the election. In races throughout the country where RCV has been adopted at the city level, it has resulted in more diverse city councils. It has become apparent that RCV enables more women and minority representation. City councils should have elected leaders who align with the people they represent. Broomfield will not be the first city or county in Colorado to adopt RCV. Other cities that have already adopted RCV, including Basalt, Carbondale and Telluride, while Boulder is in the process of implementing RCV and other counties are considering it. Ranked Choice Voting is a way to ensure elections are fair for all voters. Please support Issue 2A to enable Broomfield to help lead the way to fairer elections. MORE→
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Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Easthampton to have ranked-choice voting for mayor
westernmassnews.com
Article
331 chars
WesternMassNews.com
Ryan Trowbridge
ContextualWeb
EASTHAMPTON, MA (WGGB/WSHM) -- Election day less than three weeks away and voters in Easthampton will have ranked choice voting to decide the mayoral race.
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3 days
Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Consider both questions on November ballot
leominsterchamp.com
Article
3122 chars
Leominster Champion
Natalie Higgins
ContextualWeb
In addition to electing representatives in state and federal government, the Nov. 3 election will decide two...
In addition to electing representatives in state and federal government, the Nov. 3 election will decide two citizens’ initiatives (often referred to as the “ballot questions”). Amendment Article 48 of the Massachusetts Constitution creates this process for Massachusetts citizens to propose laws and constitutional amendments for approval by voters. After collecting 10 original petitioners, and getting certification by the Attorney General’s office that the petition met the state’s constitutional requirements, petitioners collected at least 80,239 certified signatures from Massachusetts voters last fall, and then 13,374 more signatures this spring. A “yes” vote on Question 1 would provide motor vehicle owners and independent repair facilities with expanded access to wirelessly transmitted mechanical data related to their vehicles’ maintenance and repair. You may remember we passed the first Right to Repair law in 2012 on the ballot, but as new cars become more computerized auto manufacturers are using a loophole to restrict access to data needed to diagnose problems, make repairs, and perform maintenance. Question 1 would close this loophole and would allow consumers more choice in where to have their vehicle repaired. A “yes” vote on Question 2 would implement a Ranked Choice Voting system, in which voters rank one or more candidates by order of preference. Ranked-choice voting would be used in primary and general elections for all Massachusetts statewide offices, state legislative offices, federal congressional offices, and certain other offices beginning in 2022. Ranked Choice Voting is a simple, fair, and easy way to give voters more voice. With Ranked Choice Voting, you can choose one candidate, like you always have, or rank the candidates for office in the order you prefer them, as many or as few as you like. If your favorite candidate can’t win, your vote counts instantly for your second choice, so candidates must compete for every vote. This simple change will ensure that the winner has the support of the broadest majority of voters. It gives voters more choice by letting them pick the candidate with the best ideas, not the biggest bank account. And it opens up the process to diverse voices by giving all candidates a chance to compete and win. It ensures majority support, expands voter choice, promotes diverse candidates, and curbs negative campaigning. Ranked Choice Voting will empower voters at this critical time in our democracy. No matter how you vote in the Nov. 3 election — early by mail or in person, or on Election Day — I hope you’ll consider these two ballot questions. Thank you for taking the time to read this month’s column. While my office continues to work remotely, we are still accessible by phone at (978) 227-5278 or email at . We’ve moved our office hours online — Monday nights and Friday mornings. Please email or call to sign up. Facebook Twitter MORE→
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Oct 14, 2021

 
 
 
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Westbrook voters to decide on local ranked-choice voting
pressherald.com
Article
5764 chars
Press Herald
Ann Fisher
ContextualWeb
Westbrook city officials have worked closely with Portland on the plan, which voters will weigh-in on in at the polls this November.
“Portland and the state helped us figure out how we wanted our language to look if voters wanted to adopt it,” Holmes said. If approved at the polls Nov. 2, ranked-choice voting would be used in the mayor’s race and to elect city councilors and other local elected officials when there are three or more candidates for a seat and no candidate has won more than 50% of the vote. Under the system, voters have the option of ranking the candidates in the order they prefer. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the popular vote, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated and that candidate’s supporters’ second choices are then counted. The process continues until one candidate receives more than 50%. Jones said she and Holmes worked to avoid instances in Westbrook where someone with a small number of votes wins a seat over someone well in the lead, as was the case during a Portland Charter Commission election in June. In that election, a candidate who received only 4% of the vote heading into the ranked-choice runoffs ended up defeating a candidate who had the second-highest number of votes out of the 21 candidates in the initial count. Jones said Holmes knew that to stave off any problems, she should include a provision to use proportional ranked-choice voting when there are multiple candidates in one race – as Portland residents had to do in the charter commission election. In proportional ranked-choice voting, a candidate wins when they hit a certain threshold of votes, 50% plus one. “The problems the state and P ortland went through, they’ve figured out the best way to handle things, which is great, and we get the benefits and their knowledge,” Holmes said. The City Council voted unanimously Aug. 3 to put the referendum on the ballot, with Councilors Gary Rairdon and Elliot Storey absent. Previously, Rairdon and Storey had been critical of municipal ranked-choice voting, with Rairdon saying he preferred a “one-vote” system. Jones said the most important piece in executing ranked-choice voting is voter education, to avoid any confusion. Portland residents who spoke with the American Journal Tuesday said they did not feel confused by ranked-choice voting and, if anything, they said it had little impact on their voting experience. “For me, I think it is good and useful, but I didn’t think it changed much and I didn’t really notice any difference,” Katie Greene said. Christopher Moore said local ranked-choice voting was “a major win for democracy and representation.” “I don’t think the criticism that it is too confusing is necessarily true … or a legitimate reason to preclude a vote-counting method that promotes proportional representation, provides the voter with greater democratic choice and elevates candidates who would otherwise be marginalized,” Moore said. Jeff Rommel disagreed. While he supports the idea of ranked-choice voting, he said overall it doesn’t fit with municipal elections because most residents don’t put enough research into a spate of candidates. Their votes outside of the main candidate they support are guesswork, he said. “People aren’t willing to do their research and there isn’t enough thought on that,” Rommel said. “It is confusing and doesn’t seem right here.” Former Portland Mayor Ethan Strimling said even having lost the 2019 mayoral race to Kate Snyder, when ranked-choice voting was in play, he sees only benefits from it. Snyder garnered 39% of the votes in the first round, while Thibodeau and Strimling followed with 28% and 25%, respectively. Travis Curran fell behind with 7%. “Ranked-choice voting in Portland has made our democracy more reflective of the role of the people,” Strimling said. In Portland, Strimling said, the number of progressive candidates elected to the Charter Commission reflects Portland voters. “Our council has been, I believe, out of touch with where the regular everyday majority of Portland voters stand, and since ranked-choice voting has been put into place, we now have broader representation in terms of diversity and more reflective of the (people’s) values,” he said. According to Holmes, data going back to 2013 shows that ranked-choice voting would have been used, if available, in four Westbrook races: for Ward 4 councilor in 2013, mayor in 2016 and 2019 and councilor at-large in 2019. Jones thinks ranked-choice voting is a good fit for any municipality that wants to implement it, but there is a cost. The current price of ranked-choice voting software, which is the same software used by the state and Portland, would add $25,000-$30,000 to the city’s costs per election, Holmes has said previously, including the contract company’s fees for tallying the ranked-choice votes. Even if ranked-choice voting does not come into play in a particular election, Jones said, the contractor must prepare for it beforehand and dedicate staff on Election Day in case it is needed. Westbrook voters were in favor of using ranked-choice voting in federal and state elections during Maine’s 2016 referendum, 5,657 to 3,958. All residents will vote Nov. 2. at the Community Center gym at 426 Bridge St. MORE→
4 days
Oct 13, 2021

 
 
 
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Ranked-choice voting debate rages while method spreads
gopusa.com
Article
7170 chars
GOPUSA
Gopusa Staff
ContextualWeb
New York City's first mayoral primary decided by ranked-choice voting chose a front-runner who led in every round, even after a protracted count marred by a reporting error. In Maine, Democrat Jared Golden trailed in the first round of a 2018 ranked-choice congressional contest but defeated the GOP incumbent in the next round. Now, Minneapolis'... MORE→
New York City’s first mayoral primary decided by ranked-choice voting chose a front-runner who led in every round, even after a protracted count marred by a reporting error. In Maine, Democrat Jared Golden trailed in the first round of a 2018 ranked-choice congressional contest but defeated the GOP incumbent in the next round. Now, Minneapolis’ mayoral and City Council races are set to once again use the fiercely debated system. While the November election marks its fourth citywide ranked-choice election, the method is gaining momentum around the country. “This allows people to vote with their hearts and their heads,” said Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause/New York and board chair of the pro-ranked-choice group Rank the Vote NYC. “They don’t need to pick the lesser of two evils.” But resistance to the system remains deep. “It takes away from the one person, one vote,” Maine state Rep. MaryAnne Kinney said. The Republican said she believes the voting system is “extremely confusing.” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey used the system to his advantage four years ago, when the one-term City Council member soundly defeated Mayor Betsy Hodges. Now Frey is fighting for his political life as he faces 16 challengers, including several who are banding together to use intricacies of the system to try to block the embattled mayor from a second term. Ten years ago, Minneapolis was one of only 10 cities across the United States that had adopted ranked-choice voting, according to FairVote, a leading advocate of the method. That number has now risen to more than 40 cities, according to the organization, which touted on its website that New York City’s contest was the “largest city-wide RCV election in American history.” While voting in New York City ended June 22, it took two weeks for a winner to be called in the city’s hotly contested Democratic mayoral primary. A reporting error in late June involving test ballots led to the NYC Board of Elections issuing a statement that ranked-choice voting “was not the problem, rather a human error.” The Associated Press called the race for Eric Adams on July 6. Despite the delay and tumult, the election had the city’s highest turnout for a citywide primary in more than two decades, according to the NYC Campaign Finance Board. But in the aftermath, the divide over the electoral system hasn’t subsided. Lerner said ranked choice is helping reshape the city’s male-dominated politics by boosting the number of women who are Democratic nominees for council seats, most being women of color. For critics, the June contest only heightened their opposition. Weeks before the primary, New York City Council Member I. Daneek Miller pushed for letting voters decide whether to continue using ranked-choice voting for city government’s primary and special elections. “We have said from the very beginning that ranked-choice voting threatened to undermine the voting power of communities of color, and that successful implementation of a new voting system during a global pandemic was impossible,” Miller, a Democrat and co-chair of the New York City Council’s Black, Latino, and Asian Caucus, said in a statement last week. “When we finally got the cast-vote records back from the Board of Elections, the data does show an uneven education process and a clear difference between communities that most heavily utilized ranked-choice voting versus those that did not.” Minneapolis residents voted overwhelmingly in 2006 to adopt ranked-choice voting, then referred to as an instant runoff election. At the time, supporters said they hoped the change would minimize the chances of a resident’s vote being “wasted” and encourage more positive campaigning. Critics said they feared it would cause confusion and reduce debate by eliminating primary elections. In Maine, ranked-choice voting is used for state and federal primary elections, along with general election races for federal offices, according to the Secretary of State’s Office. First used in 2018, the system came under intense scrutiny later that year when the Democratic challenger Golden toppled incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin. Despite Poliquin’s narrow lead in the first round of the general election results, Golden won the seat after third-party candidates were eliminated. “Ranked-choice voting improves representation because it gives voters true choices,” Maine Secretary of State Shenna Bellows said. A vocal supporter of the method, Bellows said she thinks “ranked-choice voting has achieved exactly what we hoped here in our state. It’s empowered voters to vote on their principles rather than party politics.” While ranked choice is gaining momentum, the shift has faced setbacks. Last year, Massachusetts voters rejected a statewide ballot question on ranked-choice voting. The system has gained a foothold in other parts of Minnesota. St. Paul began using the method locally in 2011, while ranked choice was used for the first time in St. Louis Park in 2019 for City Council elections. Voters in Minnetonka and Bloomington signed off on using the voting method last year. In other pockets of the country, ranked choice is more familiar. In California, the system is used in San Francisco elections for choosing many local offices, according to the city’s website, with Oakland and Berkeley also serving as early examples of the method being put in place out West. In another major upcoming test of the system, Alaska is working to implement ranked-choice voting for the 2022 general election in state and federal races. Voters narrowly approved the change last November as part of a larger ballot measure that also includes a nonpartisan open primary system. “The hope with ranked-choice voting and open primaries is that you get people who are much more focused, and much more worried, about policy issues as opposed to political problems,” said Jason Grenn, executive director of the pro-ranked-choice group Alaskans for Better Elections, who served one term in the Alaska House as an independent. Asked about ranked-choice voting as he left the U.S. Senate floor one night, Alaska GOP Sen. Dan Sullivan said that he didn’t support the measure, adding that “nobody understood it.” “To be honest, a lot of people in Alaska are confused,” Sullivan said. Staff writer Liz Navratil contributed to this report. Hunter Woodall ©2021 StarTribune. Visit startribune.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. This content is published through a licensing agreement with Acquire Media using its NewsEdge technology. MORE→
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Ranked Choice Voting: Boon or Doom for Dems?
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1:23:52
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Washtenawdems
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Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) for municipal elections is on the ballot in Ann Arbor (as Proposal B) on November 2. RCV has gained a lot of momentum in recent years, with advocates touting it as a cure for extreme partisanship and boon for accurate representation of voters’ interests and inclinations. But what if, as WCDP Chair Chris Savage says ... MORE→
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How Does Ranked Choice Voting Work? What Common Mistakes Do Voters Make?
minnesota.cbslocal.com
Article
2236 chars
/wcco
Jeff Wagner
Newscatcher
Minnesotans go to the polls in just three weeks. In several cities, you don't have to pick just one candidate.
MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesotans go to the polls in just three weeks. In several cities, you don’t have to pick just one candidate. Take Minneapolis. There are 17 choices for mayor and residents can choose up to three. How does ranked choice voting work and what common mistakes do voters make? Good Question. To answer it, we asked our Facebook followers to list their top three pizza toppings from a list of five. The light-hearted poll is basically how voters choose elected officials in Minneapolis and beyond through ranked choice voting. What are the first steps a voter should take when looking at a ranked choice ballot? “Read the instructions,” Minneapolis Election Administration Supervisor Aaron Grossman said. “Each race will be laid out with three columns. And each column will be the first choice, second choice and third choice … going from left to right.” You can vote for one candidate, or up to three. Bubble in your top choice in the first column, then your second choice in the second column, and so on. What if a voter ranks one candidate multiple times? “Yes, we see that,” Grossman said. “It doesn’t help that candidate at all if you rank them three times, it also doesn’t hurt them in that situation. It’d be the same as just ranking them once and then leaving your other two spots blank.” The first choice votes are counted first, and a candidate wins if they get more than 50% of the vote. Using our pizza poll of 56 voters, 31 people made pepperoni their first choice, which is enough to win. Had it received less than 50%, the candidate with the lowest number of first place votes — in this case pineapple — would be removed, and those who ranked it number one would have their second choice votes added to the other candidates. “And we continue that process until we have somebody who does reach that threshold and is elected,” Grossman said. During the 2017 election in Minneapolis, 16 of the 22 races required further tabulation for a candidate to top 50%. MORE→
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Good Question: How Does Ranked Choice Voting Work?
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Minnesotans go to the polls in just three weeks, and in several cities, you don't have to pick just one candidate.
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Good Question: How Does Ranked Choice Voting Work?
minnesota.cbslocal.com
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11739 chars
/wcco
Newscatcher
Minnesotans go to the polls in just three weeks, and in several cities, you don't have to pick just one candidate.
COVID Vs. Cold: What To Look For With kids back in school and COVID cases rising, it can be tough for parents to know if their kid's runny nose is a cold or COVID. 4 minutes ago US Will Reopen Borders To Vaccinated Travelers Next Month Since the beginning of the pandemic, only essential travel - mainly for business and trade - was allowed between our land borders. 19 minutes ago Interview: How To Protect Your Family From The Flu Health officials are warning this flu season could be worse than previous years. 20 minutes ago 6 A.M. Weather Report Rainfall has already hit southern Minnesota, and it's making its way to the Twin Cities. 22 minutes ago Morning Headlines: Oct. 13, 2021 Jason DeRusha is talking about park rules in Ramsey County. 24 minutes ago Is It COVID Or A Cold? With kids back in school there are a lot of viruses going around. But it can be hard to tell if it's COVID or just a cold. 29 minutes ago US Borders Will Reopen For Non-Essential Travel For Vaccinated Next Month This is the end of a 19-month travel ban on foreigners' access into the US by land from Mexico and Canada. 31 minutes ago WCCO Digital Update: Morning Of Oct. 13, 2021 Jason DeRusha has the latest headlines. 2 hours ago 4:30 A.M. Weather Report A system will move through the state Wednesday, bringing rain and wind gusts. 2 hours ago 10 P.M. Weather Report Get ready to rake! The winds will pick up big time Wednesday across Minnesota. 7 hours ago MOA Offers BIPOC Store Owners Rent-Free Space For 3 Months A new program is giving small, local companies a chance at something big. 7 hours ago Good Question: How Does Ranked Choice Voting Work? Minnesotans go to the polls in just three weeks, and in several cities, you don't have to pick just one candidate. 7 hours ago Toilet Explosion Rocks Pine City Home A Pine City family dealing with a plumbing nightmare was getting nowhere with the city, then WCCO stepped in to try to help. 7 hours ago Ex-Proctor High School Football Coach Speaks Out After Resignation The coach of a northern Minnesota high school football team is speaking out amid the criminal investigation into a sexual assault between players, which led to cancellation of the team's season. 7 hours ago St. Paul Mass Shooting: First Responders Recount Night Of ‘Chaos’ WCCO’s Susan-Elizabeth Littlefield talks with a St. Paul firefighter and medic who answered a call unlike any the city had ever seen last weekend. 8 hours ago RAW VIDEO: School Bus T-Boned Southwest Of Twin Cities A student on the Hutchinson High School cross-country team captured the moment his school bus was T-boned by a vehicle Tuesday night in Norwood Young America, 8 hours ago Students Hurt In School Bus Crash In Norwood Young America The Minnesota State Patrol says a crash involving a school bus has resulted in injuries Tuesday night southwest of the Twin Cities. 8 hours ago 6 P.M. Weather Report Meteorologist Chris Shaffer reports on the rain expected for Wednesday. 12 hours ago Minneapolis Animal Care & Dropping Adoption Fee To 'Clear The Shelter' To help dogs find their forever homes, Minneapolis Animal Care and Control is waiving adoption fees for all adoptable dogs 3-8 p.m. Oct. 12 and 13. 13 hours ago 2 Minneapolis Restaurants Named On NYT's List Of 50 Most Vibrant & Delicious Restaurants The two restaurants honored are Owamni and Sooki & Mimi. 13 hours ago How To Apply For Rental Assistance As COVID Protections Lift As the eviction moratorium ends, there could be a spike of people facing eviction as Minnesota winter comes on. 13 hours ago Remembering Autumn Rose Merrick Her family spoke with WCCO-TV about who she was and what happened the night her young life was cut short. 13 hours ago 5 P.M. Weather Report Clouds will be increasing ahead of a storm system moving in. Some strong wind will be coming in Wednesday. 14 hours ago Is It A Cold? Or COVID-19? Here’s How To Test Your Kids for Virus Experts say the only way to know whether or not your child’s cold-like symptoms are COVID-19 is to test for it. But when testing at the sign of every sniffle isn’t an option, what should you look for? 14 hours ago MORE→
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Former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake makes $150,000 donation to voting group
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Lachlan Markay
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Former Sen. Jeff Flake, a Republican who's now President Biden's nominee to be ambassador to Turkey, is funding a nonprofit focused on election processes in his home state of Arizona, Axios has learned.Why it matters: Arizona is ground-zero for election conspiracy theories. While those behind the Public Integrity Foundation say that's not the impetus for the group, they hope it will address some of the underlying issues.Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with Axios Mar MORE→
Why it matters: Arizona is ground-zero for election conspiracy theories. While those behind the Public Integrity Foundation say that's not the impetus for the group, they hope it will address some of the underlying issues. Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free What's happening: Flake's Senate campaign committee — which is still active — donated $150,000 to the Foundation in late September, days after it was formed, according to Federal Election Commission records. Tyler Montague, the Foundation's chairman, told Axios the group approached Flake about backing its efforts, and his donation is its largest financial commitment, so far. "Jeff Flake is a long time friend, and he’s also interested in one of the charter purposes of the foundation, which is to do research and education around alternative forms of voting," Montague said in a text message. Like Flake, Montague is a Republican who's been critical of Donald Trump . He also runs the Public Integrity Alliance, a Mesa-based advocacy group that sued Maricopa County last year over ballot instructions it said violated state law. Flake did not immediately respond to a request for comment on his donation. The details: Montague said the Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, will study practices such as ranked-choice voting and approval voting . "We aren’t limiting ourselves to any one particular method," he said. The group is eyeing models such as Alaska's, which in 2020 included a top-four primary and a ranked-choice general election. "Ranked-choice voting has a lot of merits even though NYC botched their first election with it," Montague said. Between the lines: The Foundation is launching in a state bedeviled by controversies and conspiracy theories surrounding the 2020 election. While a Republican-led "audit" of the state's election confirmed Biden's victory last year, state and national GOP leaders continue to falsely claim that fraud tainted the outcome. Montague said that controversy wasn't the impetus for the Foundation but improved election processes could be an antidote in the future. "It’s definitely a sign that there is a disconnect between the agenda of who we are electing and what the general public believes/wants," he said. "Which is one of the key arguments made by people who advocate for something like RCV over our current election methods." MORE→
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Council votes 8-3 to pursue consent decree over School Committee voting rights lawsuit
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Claims that the all at-large method of electing School Committee members has created a consistently all-white board that lives in a small geographic area of the city.
© WPS Worcester Public SchoolsRelated Facebook postShared from FacebookWORCESTER — At-large City Councilor Gary Rosen, nearing the end of his long career in elected office, noted Tuesday night he was "five for five" running for the School Committee, and he surmised it might have had something to do with the color of his skin. That, in essence, is the heart the argument of a lawsuit that has been hanging over the council chambers for most of the year: That the all at-large method of electing School Committee members has created a consistently all-white board that lives in a small geographic area of the city. Its very structure dilutes minority representation on the committee, and is discriminatory toward communities of color, the coalition of groups bringing the lawsuit, including the Worcester chapter of the NAACP and Worcester Interfaith, have alleged.After voting 8-2 in April not to fight the lawsuit, the council brought months of closed-door meetings out in the open Tuesday, and voted, 8-3 this time, to authorize City Solicitor Michael Traynor to enter into a consent decree with the plaintiffs that will require the council to pick one of three options by Nov. 30. A look at the optionsOnce the council picks one of the options, it will have to be sent to the state Legislature for a home rule petition. Once the new system of electing School Committee members is in place, the lawsuit will essentially become settled, Traynor explained to the council Tuesday. All the options involve some measure of district representation, including the establishment of majority-minority districts. The first option of the three that came out of closed-door council meetings is a single-member district-based system for electing all members of the School Committee with no at-large seats. There will be a total of six School Committee districts, including two majority-minority districts, based on citizen voting age population of Hispanic/Latino and Black residents, and the mayor as chair. The first hybrid the council is proposing is a system that combines single-member district-based seats with a single at-large seat. Under the hybrid system, the School Committee will be made up of seven single-member district-based seats, including two majority-minority districts, based on citizen voting age population of Hispanic/Latino and Black residents, with one at-large seat and the mayor as chair.The second hybrid system the council is proposing combines single-member district-based seats with two at-large seats. Under the hybrid system, the School Committee will be made up of six single-member district-based seats, including two majority-minority districts, based on citizen voting age population of Hispanic/Latino and Black residents, with two at-large seats and the Mayor as chair.Traynor noted Tuesday that a consent decree is a vehicle for settling a lawsuit. Both parties must sign it, and the court oversees its implementation. The council also voted Tuesday to refer the three options to the Municipal Operations Committee, where the public will be able to provide input. Resident Cory Bisbee suggested Tuesday the council could, and should, explore more options than the three presented. He said ranked-choice voting should have been part of the discussion, although later in the meeting, Traynor said that during one of the executive session meetings, the idea of ranked choice voting was rejected. Traynor also said that once the council voted to authorize him to sign the consent decree, those three options are the ones that have to be considered. With lawsuit unsettled, City Council puts out new options for School Committee elections'A ways to go'Councilors debated authorizing the consent decree into the evening Tuesday. Mayor Joseph M. Petty said it's an important issue, and entering into the consent decree is the responsible thing to do. The city "has a ways to go," Petty said, but the consent decree sends a good message to communities of color in the city. District 4 Councilor Sarai Rivera was shocked the council was still having this conversation so long after it decided not to fight the lawsuit. She said the consent decree is the council's opportunity to do something right, and to put all the words thrown around on the council floor - equity, inclusion, diversity - into action. At-large Councilor Khrystian King said restructuring the School Committee's electoral process might not be a guarantee, but does increase the prospect of better representation for the city's Black and Latino population, the two groups identified by the plaintiffs in the lawsuit. At-large Councilor Morris Bergman, who voted against not fighting the lawsuit earlier this year and voted against the consent decree Tuesday, said it certainly wasn't a guarantee, and asked Traynor how it could be illegal for one group of people - whites - to vote as a bloc, but creating a voting bloc of another group of people - Blacks and Latinos - was the solution to a problem. Traynor explained that having the white vote dilute the voting power of minorities runs afoul of the federal Voting Rights Act. Bergman also asked how the city would account for people moving into the district after the consent decree goes into effect who might change the demographics of an area that was carved out as minority-majority. He said the creation of minority-majority districts might send the message that only people of a certain color can represent people of color. King disputed Bergman's comments. He said the council can't allow the narrative to be changed. This is about giving people a better opportunity to be represented in city government, he said. He said the facts are clear - in nearly 300 years, the city only elected its first Black woman to office in 1973. There has never been a Black man on the School Committee. King himself was the first Black man elected to the council since 1936. The School Committee lawsuit speaks to those inequities, he said. "This body conceded with an 8 to 2 vote that our current at-large system is unfair," King said. "We did that. Us. 8 to 2."Transparency at issueDistrict 2 Councilor Candy Mero-Carlson and at-large Councilor Donna Colorio also voted against moving forward with the consent decree Tuesday night. They both said they were concerned about transparency, and how much of a public process the council will be able to have under the approaching Nov. 30 deadline. The council took months to get to this point, but Mero-Carlson pointed out Tuesday that it was only over the course of four meetings. She said the council needs more public input, and she was concerned about who would be drawing the new School Committee district maps. She was also concerned that the consent decree would lock the council into one of the the three options presented Tuesday night, when a member of the community might come forward with a better idea. Traynor said he is not sure what other options are out there that the council didn't explore. And he said the city would likely retain the same expert Lowell used after it went through a similar process - Stanford Professor Nathaniel Persily, although the third-party expert would be mutually agreed upon between the city and the plaintiffs. Colorio said it concerned her that the public, up until now, hasn't been part of the process. She said the council is basically looking at a month of opportunity for public input. King said the city could have had public input sessions concurrently as it was discussing the lawsuit in executive session. And Rivera said that beyond the specific discussions about the lawsuit, the council has been confronted with the broader issues if inequity in the city for a long time. Colorio said she wanted to be clear that her vote against not fighting the lawsuit earlier this year was not about fairness or minority representation - it was about the process. She said she thought there were other options the council could have pursued at the time. Changing the city charterDistrict 3 Councilor George Russell and at-large Councilor Kathleen Toomey both floated the idea of looking at charter change as a possible avenue, and Russell said he was concerned about how the proposed maps looked - he said they appeared to resemble hallways through the city's borders that didn't make a lot of geographical sense. District 1 Councilor Sean Rose said the consent decree was a chance to really move the city forward. He said the discussion Tuesday amounted to the saddest and most heartbreaking meeting he has been a part of to date. He said eight of 10 councilors voted earlier this year to work toward a solution. He said he heard a lot of questioning of experts and timelines Tuesday night, but what is at stake is a real chance to "right this broken system." District 5 Councilor Matthew Wally said he thinks district representation on the School Committee could be helpful, but was concerned it could lead to confusion. And he said he was disappointed it took a lawsuit to get this done. Rosen said with the population the city has, people of color should have been serving on the School Committee long ago. The system the city has diminishes their chances, he said. He said it's time that students who see teachers and administrators of color in their schools see people of color on their School Committee. The city doesn't have to go kicking and screaming to get this done, he said. And on the topic of public input, Rosen said if it's four weeks, then it's four weeks. And besides, he said, the council is elected by the public to make these kinds of decisions. "Let's get people of color on the School Committee," Rosen said. "So we can rectify the wrongs of the past."King said the council would be disappointed if diversity doesn't increase after the changes go into effect, but he acknowledged there are no guarantees. "But this certainly is the right thing to do," King said. "It is certainly time to move this forward."This article originally appeared on Telegram & Gazette: Council votes 8-3 to pursue consent decree over School Committee voting rights lawsuit MORE→
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Ranked choice voting: what is it
sitnews.us
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3926 chars
sitnews.us
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Ketchikan, Alaska news. Southeast Alaska news, Alaska news, national and world news.
Ranked choice voting: what is it, how does it work, and will it change Alaskan politics? October 11, 2021 Monday PM (SitNews) - Following its adoption by ballot initiative last year, Alaska’s future state and national elections will be held under Ranked Choice Voting, allowing voters to specify not just their favoured candidate but also their second, third and fourth choices. In the 2020 General Election, Alaska voters approved an initiative to establish a Nonpartisan Top Four Primary Election system and a Ranked Choice Voting General Election system. In the next general election on November 06, 2022, Ranked Choice Voting in Alaska will allow voters to rank their choices in order of preference. For a candidate to win, they must receive a majority (50% + 1) of total votes cast. If no candidate receives a majority of votes in the first round of counting, more rounds of counting continue until a candidate reaches a majority( More about Alaska's Rank Choice Voting ) This system is gaining ground across the United States and has been used for over a century in Australia, home of Political Scientist Professor Benjamin Reilly, University of Western Australia. Professor Reilly is visiting Juneau for his research and discussed recently during Evening at Egan Fall 2021, how Ranked Choice Voting works; its implications for voters, candidates and political parties; and what insights from comparative experience suggests for how the new system may impact Alaskan politics. November 08, 2022 Ranked Choice SAMPLE Voting Ballot https://www.elections.alaska.gov/doc/GenRCVSampleBallot6.pdf Alaska Division of Elections More About Rank Choice Voting https://www.elections.alaska.gov/RCV.php Register to Vote or Update Voter Registration Online Alaska Department of Elections Edited By Mary Kauffman, SitNews Source of News: Alaska Division of Elections www.elections.alaska.gov University of Alaska - Evening at Egan Fall 2021 Lectures uas.alaska.edu/eganlecture/ Representations of fact and opinions in comments posted are solely those of the individual posters and do not represent the opinions of Sitnews. Send a letter to the SitNews ©2021 Stories In The News Ketchikan, Alaska Articles & photographs that appear in SitNews are considered protected by copyright and may not be reprinted without written permission from and payment of any required fees to the proper freelance writers and subscription services. E-mail your news & photos to Photographers choosing to submit photographs for publication to SitNews are in doing so granting their permission for publication and for archiving. SitNews does not sell photographs. All requests for purchasing a photograph will be emailed to the photographer. MORE→
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Is ranked-choice voting too complicated? Utah lawmakers may let cities experiment with approval voting
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KUER
@Sonjahutson
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Ranked-choice voting lets voters choose candidates in order of preference. With approval voting, people mark which candidates they’d be ok with being elected.
Utah state lawmakers may add approval voting to a pilot program for municipal elections. Right now, cities are only allowed to try out ranked-choice voting — which lets voters choose candidates in order of preference. If no one gets a majority of votes, the person with the fewest is eliminated. The process continues until there’s a winner. With approval voting, people mark which candidates they’d be OK with being elected. The candidate that receives the most votes wins. Davis County Clerk/Auditor Curtis Koch said that method is a lot simpler and that’s particularly important in a time when there’s so much skepticism about election security. “We don't want to be put in a position where we are explaining why this candidate dropped out when it looked like they were ahead,” Koch said about ranked-choice voting. “That's not a clean, easy order process to explain to voters.” But lawmakers are still hesitant to move forward with approval voting before they know how ranked-choice voting plays out this year. Twenty-three cities have signed up to try it. A state legislative committee has been discussing the issue for months now. “Any process that you put out there — you've always got to be evaluating whether or not it has trust and confidence, what's the experience of the voter, how they feel about it?” said Sen. Ann Millner, R-Ogden, who’s on the committee. Millner said they could have time to review that information by the start of the General Session in January. MORE→
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Fairbanks Forum - Division of Elections Ranked Choice Voting
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Alaska Support Industry Alliance
BingVideo
Jeremy Johnson, Region 3 District Supervisor, State of Alaska, Division of Elections gives us an idea of what our Ranked Choice ballots will look like next November and answers a ton of questions. Apologies about the audio. You will want to turn the volume up! MORE→
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Ranked-choice voting program offered
sharonherald.com
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589 chars
The Herald
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SHARON – Dr. Kelly Bonomo, a mathematics professor at Grove City College, will speak about ranked-choice voting at Saturday's Mercer County League of Women Voters program.
You are now listening to the sounds of the New Generation. A podcast created for those who desire a new way of gaining information rather than reading a traditional newspaper. In our show we will discuss everything from sports, pop culture, politics, and local news. To stay up to date on our latest episodes every week be sure to follow us on your favorite podcast service. And don’t worry, we keep it short. MORE→
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Ranked-choice voting debate rages while method spreads
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MSN
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New York City's first mayoral primary decided by ranked-choice voting chose a front-runner who led in every round, even after a protracted count marred by a reporting error. In Maine, Democrat Jared Golden trailed in the first round of a 2018 ranked-choice congressional contest but defeated the GOP incumbent in the next round. Now, Minneapolis' mayoral and City Council races are set to once ... MORE→
New York City's first mayoral primary decided by ranked-choice voting chose a front-runner who led in every round, even after a protracted count marred by a reporting error. In Maine, Democrat Jared Golden trailed in the first round of a 2018 ranked-choice congressional contest but defeated the GOP incumbent in the next round.Now, Minneapolis' mayoral and City Council races are set to once again use the fiercely debated system. While the November election marks its fourth citywide ranked-choice election, the method is gaining momentum around the country."This allows people to vote with their hearts and their heads," said Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause/New York and board chair of the pro-ranked-choice group Rank the Vote NYC. "They don't need to pick the lesser of two evils."But resistance to the system remains deep."It takes away from the one person, one vote," Maine state Rep. MaryAnne Kinney said. The Republican said she believes the voting system is "extremely confusing."Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey used the system to his advantage four years ago, when the one-term City Council member soundly defeated Mayor Betsy Hodges. Now Frey is fighting for his political life as he faces 16 challengers, including several who are banding together to use intricacies of the system to try to block the embattled mayor from a second term.Ten years ago, Minneapolis was one of only 10 cities across the United States that had adopted ranked-choice voting, according to FairVote, a leading advocate of the method. That number has now risen to more than 40 cities, according to the organization, which touted on its website that New York City's contest was the "largest city-wide RCV election in American history."While voting in New York City ended June 22, it took two weeks for a winner to be called in the city's hotly contested Democratic mayoral primary. A reporting error in late June involving test ballots led to the NYC Board of Elections issuing a statement that ranked-choice voting "was not the problem, rather a human error."The Associated Press called the race for Eric Adams on July 6. Despite the delay and tumult, the election had the city's highest turnout for a citywide primary in more than two decades, according to the NYC Campaign Finance Board. But in the aftermath, the divide over the electoral system hasn't subsided.Lerner said ranked choice is helping reshape the city's male-dominated politics by boosting the number of women who are Democratic nominees for council seats, most being women of color.For critics, the June contest only heightened their opposition. Weeks before the primary, New York City Council Member I. Daneek Miller pushed for letting voters decide whether to continue using ranked-choice voting for city government's primary and special elections."We have said from the very beginning that ranked-choice voting threatened to undermine the voting power of communities of color, and that successful implementation of a new voting system during a global pandemic was impossible," Miller, a Democrat and co-chair of the New York City Council's Black, Latino, and Asian Caucus, said in a statement last week. "When we finally got the cast-vote records back from the Board of Elections, the data does show an uneven education process and a clear difference between communities that most heavily utilized ranked-choice voting versus those that did not."Minneapolis residents voted overwhelmingly in 2006 to adopt ranked-choice voting, then referred to as an instant runoff election. At the time, supporters said they hoped the change would minimize the chances of a resident's vote being "wasted" and encourage more positive campaigning. Critics said they feared it would cause confusion and reduce debate by eliminating primary elections.In Maine, ranked-choice voting is used for state and federal primary elections, along with general election races for federal offices, according to the Secretary of State's Office.First used in 2018, the system came under intense scrutiny later that year when the Democratic challenger Golden toppled incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin. Despite Poliquin's narrow lead in the first round of the general election results, Golden won the seat after third-party candidates were eliminated."Ranked-choice voting improves representation because it gives voters true choices," Maine Secretary of State Shenna Bellows said. A vocal supporter of the method, Bellows said she thinks "ranked-choice voting has achieved exactly what we hoped here in our state. It's empowered voters to vote on their principles rather than party politics."While ranked choice is gaining momentum, the shift has faced setbacks. Last year, Massachusetts voters rejected a statewide ballot question on ranked-choice voting. The system has gained a foothold in other parts of Minnesota. St. Paul began using the method locally in 2011, while ranked choice was used for the first time in St. Louis Park in 2019 for City Council elections. Voters in Minnetonka and Bloomington signed off on using the voting method last year.In other pockets of the country, ranked choice is more familiar. In California, the system is used in San Francisco elections for choosing many local offices, according to the city's website, with Oakland and Berkeley also serving as early examples of the method being put in place out West.In another major upcoming test of the system, Alaska is working to implement ranked-choice voting for the 2022 general election in state and federal races. Voters narrowly approved the change last November as part of a larger ballot measure that also includes a nonpartisan open primary system."The hope with ranked-choice voting and open primaries is that you get people who are much more focused, and much more worried, about policy issues as opposed to political problems," said Jason Grenn, executive director of the pro-ranked-choice group Alaskans for Better Elections, who served one term in the Alaska House as an independent.Asked about ranked-choice voting as he left the U.S. Senate floor one night, Alaska GOP Sen. Dan Sullivan said that he didn't support the measure, adding that "nobody understood it.""To be honest, a lot of people in Alaska are confused," Sullivan said.Staff writer Liz Navratil contributed to this report.Hunter Woodall • 612-673-4559Twitter: @huntermw MORE→
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NYC early voting: Dates, times and more to know about the 2021 election
pix11.com
Article
6895 chars
PIX11
Lauren Cook
BingNews
NEW YORK — New Yorkers have just over a week to go before they can cast their vote for who they want as the city’s next mayor. There are nine days of early voting this month ahead of the Nov. 2 gen…
NEW YORK — New Yorkers have just over a week to go before they can cast their vote for who they want as the city’s next mayor. There are nine days of early voting this month ahead of the Nov. 2 general election — and there’s more than the mayor’s office at stake. There are candidates vying for a host of citywide and borough-based seats , including public advocate, comptroller and borough president. Here’s what you need to know. Who’s running for NYC mayor? Republican nominee Curtis Sliwa and Democratic nominee Eric Adams are among the candidates vying to become the next mayor of New York City. Sliwa also ran his campaign as an independent candidate. After the primary election in June, he told PIX11 News he hoped to sway independents in an effort to level the playing field in a city with a heavily Democratic voter base. As the leader of the Guardian Angels, Sliwa has touted himself as the law-and-order candidate who can bring gun violence in the city under control. He also floated a pilot program for Universal Basic Income , which would provide $1,100 a month to 500 residents with “no strings attached and no means testing.” Adams, meanwhile, has declared himself a “ left-wing member of that left-wing party ,” while also emphasizing his working-class origins and experience as an NYPD captain. He’s also doubled down on crime prevention , saying the city needs to be perceived as safe if businesses are going to bring employees back to work after the pandemic and start investing in New York again. Other mayoral hopefuls on the ballot include: William A. Pepitone, Conservative Catherine Rojas, Socialism & Lib Stacey H. Prussman, Libertarian Fernando Mateo, Save Our City Raja Michael Flores, Humanity United Skiboky Stora, Out Lawbreaker Quanda S. Francis, Empowerment What other races are on the ballot? New Yorkers will also vote for city comptroller — the city’s CFO — and public advocate, as well as City Council representatives and judicial roles. Notably, Democrat Alvin Bragg and Republican Thomas Kenniff will face off to become the next Manhattan district attorney . Whoever wins will inherit several high-profile cases, including an investigation into former President Donald Trump’s business practices that led to criminal charges against the Trump Organization and its CFO. How does early voting work? As long as you are registered to vote in New York City, you can take advantage of early voting; you don’t need to specifically register for early voting. All you need to do is show up at your designated early voting polling location to cast your ballot in person. To find your assigned early voting location, click here . What are the early voting dates, times and locations in NYC? In-person early voting for the general election will begin Saturday, Oct. 23 and run through Sunday, Oct. 31. The general election will be held Tuesday, Nov. 2. Your early voting polling site may not be the same location where you normally vote in general elections. There are between 10 and 32 early voting locations, depending on the borough you live in. For a full list of early voting locations, click h e re . To find your assigned early voting location using your address, click here . Polling sites will be open at the following dates and times: Saturday, Oct. 23 – 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24 – 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 25 – 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26 – 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 27 – 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28 – 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29 – 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30 – 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 31 – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. What about voting by mail? Voters can still choose to vote via absentee ballot due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you would like to vote by mail, an absentee ballot application must be submitted to the city Board of Elections by Monday, Oct. 18. For more information on how to submit a request for an absentee ballot, click here . Will there be ranked choice voting, like the primary? The city’s new ranked choice voting system , which allows voters to pick up to five candidates in order of their preference instead of choosing just one, only applies to primaries and special elections — not general elections. This story comprises reporting from The Associated Press . MORE→
6 days
Oct 11, 2021
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